HŠxan (1922) Filmografinr: 1922/06

Poor little hysterical witch! In the middle ages you were in conflict with the church. Now it is with the law.

Title Card: “Häxan (1922)”

We really ought to be saving this one for our own private inspiration board, but a higher wisdom has urged us to share.  We swear!

This sinisterly beautiful Style {WISE} is from the archives of cinema history. Back to the days of the silent film, where the power of imagery ruled supreme.

haxan devils

The film is the 1922 Pseudo Documentary Art-House Horror Silent Classic, Häxan (pronounced “hek-sen”). Imaginations soared through creative interpretations of alleged real-life events right up through to the early twentieth century.  The Swedish Film was directed, written, and starring Benjamin Christensen as the Devil himself.

Ultimately  comparing the hysteria of contemporary (1921) women with the behaviour of the witches in the Middle Ages; the film concludes that they are very similar. Hey, we never said a peep! {click here for more}

haxan2-1

Title Card: Centuries have passed and the Almighty of medieval times no longer sits in his tenth sphere.

Title Card: We no longer sit in church staring terrified at the frescoes of the devils.

Title Card: The witch no longer flies away on her broom over the rooftops.

Title Card: But isn’t superstition still rampant among us?

Title Card: Is there an obvious difference between the sorceress and her customer then and now?

Title Card: We no longer burn our old and poor. But do they not often suffer bitterly?

Title Card: And the little woman, whom we call hysterical, alone and unhappy, isn’t she still a riddle for us?

Title Card: Nowadays we detain the unhappy in a mental institution or – if she is wealthy – in a modern clinic.

Title Card: And then we will console ourselves with the notion that the mildly temperate shower of the clinic has replaced the barbaric methods of medieval times.

Häxan (1922)

haxan

What’s most fascinating is the way they amp up the already iconic images we have in our mind when we turn our thoughts to the idea of witchcraft, the frenzy of the medieval times, and the rugged decay of the Medieval Times. All these elements are intensified and, almost glamourized, for the silver screen in a way only the 1920s could make happen.

Wouldn’t it be great to  see more powerful imagery like this come to the forefront today, while still staying beautiful ? Perhaps some of you beauties will find some inspiration to take with you after your visit here with The Eye of Faith.

haxen

haxan-1

Witchcraft through the Ages (1922 Sweden) aka Haxan Documentary

Häxan: Witchcraft through the ages, is a true experience for the eyes and ears,  with music beautifully composed by Emil Reesen.

Seemingly a silent horror sensation, but truly a documentation of modern man.

So much faith is thrown into the blind eyes of God, as fellow man takes judgement and punishment upon himself.

1922 Haxan - Witchcraft through the ages - La brujeria a traves de los tiempos (foto) 02

Just a little something-something to get those juices flowing!

Until we meet again?

{theEye}

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7 thoughts on “STYLE {WISE} Häxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages (1922)

  1. I bought the Criterion edition a few years back. A film that doesn’t pull punches, and you can see the mindset it explores rising again and again. Fear and persecution. Just plain insanity.
    The godforsaken horror that overtook Kelly Michaels comes to mind.

    Like

    • Freaking amazing film! It is so evocative, and actually really quite freaky and terrifying and points. I loved it! Although, I always knew I would even before I saw it! It was just too up my alley 🙂

      Great minds think alike, don’t they say?

      Like

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