Tag Archives: silent

{PHOTOBLAST} MAN, I FEEL LIKE A WOMAN – VINTAGE STYLE INSPIRATION

elizabeth-bergner-1922-man-i-feel-like-a-woman-vintage-style-inspiration-the-eye-of-faith-bad-ass-androgyny-birth-of-modernity

I like being a woman, even in a man’s world. After all, men can’t wear dresses, but we can wear the pants. 

Whitney Houston

I love to see a young girl go out and grab the world by the lapels. Life’s a bitch. You’ve got to go out and kick ass.

Maya Angelou

Just wanted to send some love out to the ladies of this world who break boundaries, and live strong and powerful lives.

Always finding inspiration in your strength, dignity, grace and beauty.

Appreciating all facets in this {PHOTOBLAST} – you take from it what you see.

Hope you enjoy !

Check out more in our archives

Stay wise and never compromise.

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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The Eye of Faith Shop Banner Boys

 

{PHOTO BLAST} Playing With Pandora’s Box

Louise Brooks- Legendary in Pandoras Box

You know how the story goes, don’t you?

She was a seductive woman  and the first woman in Greek mythology. Made from Earth to punish Prometheus for his overreaching and theft of the sacred fire, her youthful curiosity led her to opening a mysterious jar, the “Pandora’s Box”, that contained all the evils of humanity, releasing them into the wild.

According to the myth, she closed the jar leaving only HOPE inside.

Thanks, Pandora.

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It’s an age old tale going back to Ancient times, but the story is still permeating our landscape to this day.

Was Pandora just curious, or did she have a bit of a wild streak? You know how they say if your parents say not to do something, you’re going to do it. A little work of the Rebel Spirits, perhaps?

We wanted to make a {PHOTO BLAST} dedicated to the ultimate bad girl, and the many incarnations we saw of her. So please, enjoy!

Until Next Time,

{theEye}

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Kiss of the Skeleton Woman

STYLE {WISE} Häxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages (1922)

HŠxan (1922) Filmografinr: 1922/06

Poor little hysterical witch! In the middle ages you were in conflict with the church. Now it is with the law.

Title Card: “Häxan (1922)”

We really ought to be saving this one for our own private inspiration board, but a higher wisdom has urged us to share.  We swear!

This sinisterly beautiful Style {WISE} is from the archives of cinema history. Back to the days of the silent film, where the power of imagery ruled supreme.

haxan devils

The film is the 1922 Pseudo Documentary Art-House Horror Silent Classic, Häxan (pronounced “hek-sen”). Imaginations soared through creative interpretations of alleged real-life events right up through to the early twentieth century.  The Swedish Film was directed, written, and starring Benjamin Christensen as the Devil himself.

Ultimately  comparing the hysteria of contemporary (1921) women with the behaviour of the witches in the Middle Ages; the film concludes that they are very similar. Hey, we never said a peep! {click here for more}

haxan2-1

Title Card: Centuries have passed and the Almighty of medieval times no longer sits in his tenth sphere.

Title Card: We no longer sit in church staring terrified at the frescoes of the devils.

Title Card: The witch no longer flies away on her broom over the rooftops.

Title Card: But isn’t superstition still rampant among us?

Title Card: Is there an obvious difference between the sorceress and her customer then and now?

Title Card: We no longer burn our old and poor. But do they not often suffer bitterly?

Title Card: And the little woman, whom we call hysterical, alone and unhappy, isn’t she still a riddle for us?

Title Card: Nowadays we detain the unhappy in a mental institution or – if she is wealthy – in a modern clinic.

Title Card: And then we will console ourselves with the notion that the mildly temperate shower of the clinic has replaced the barbaric methods of medieval times.

Häxan (1922)

haxan

What’s most fascinating is the way they amp up the already iconic images we have in our mind when we turn our thoughts to the idea of witchcraft, the frenzy of the medieval times, and the rugged decay of the Medieval Times. All these elements are intensified and, almost glamourized, for the silver screen in a way only the 1920s could make happen.

Wouldn’t it be great to  see more powerful imagery like this come to the forefront today, while still staying beautiful ? Perhaps some of you beauties will find some inspiration to take with you after your visit here with The Eye of Faith.

haxen

haxan-1

Witchcraft through the Ages (1922 Sweden) aka Haxan Documentary

Häxan: Witchcraft through the ages, is a true experience for the eyes and ears,  with music beautifully composed by Emil Reesen.

Seemingly a silent horror sensation, but truly a documentation of modern man.

So much faith is thrown into the blind eyes of God, as fellow man takes judgement and punishment upon himself.

1922 Haxan - Witchcraft through the ages - La brujeria a traves de los tiempos (foto) 02

Just a little something-something to get those juices flowing!

Until we meet again?

{theEye}

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {February 14, 2013}

EOF- Happy Valentines Day- 2013- Vintage Black and White Postcard - 1920s

{Kiss The Girl}

Happy Valentine’s Day! Be Sweet to Your Sweetheart!

Le Coup de Foudre

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EOF - The Silent Stare of James Dean, East of Eden Studio Still, Publicity Photograph. Beauty and the Beast.

{The Silent Stare of James Dean – The Rebel King}

Publicity Photograph for “East of Eden” (1955)

as Caleb, the Bad Son.

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{Buster Keaton getting full service from Jimmy Durante.  Circa. 1930s}
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Ladies and Gentlemen. The Ever Hilarious Buster Keaton {Candid Circa.1961}

Imagine our delight when we spent some time searching one of our Style Idols, Buster Keaton‘s movies, and stumbled upon a great clip from a 1961 edition of Allen Funt’s CBS-TV show “Candid Camera.” with the Silent Film Slap-Stick legend himself!

Looking as good as the ‘forgotten’ screen idol ever has, even in camouflaged casual, the man rocks some grandpa glasses and a cool convertible trench!  No matter how grand a joker the guy is, his chic gentlemanly nature always shines through any farce.

We love the shock and horror race across the faces of the teenage victims as Keaton pulls gag after gag at the counter of a dinner.  These kids were clueless to the fact that a  Hollywood Royal was not only sitting next to them, but was pulling a Betty White proportioned fast-one over their heads.

{The Eye}


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E.O.F. Style Icon: Buster Keaton

Known as the ‘Great Stone Face’, standing at an astounding 5’5″ we honour a style icon, Buster Keaton. Unconventional, timeless, and one of a kind comedic sensibility, this man’s legacy is more than just dissolving film and a steely gaze. From a time where men had to be men, Buster found a spot for himself amongst film royalty, with a unique perspective to comedy, and a whimsy to his overall performance nobody could replicate. Watching old reels of this pro, we know we’re witnessing true magic.

“Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot.”
Buster Keaton

“Silence is of the gods; only monkeys chatter.”
Buster Keaton

Born Joseph Frank Keaton VI, by Vaudville performer parents Joe Keaton and Myra Keaton in Piqua, Kansas on October 4, 1895. The family soon came to tour the Vaudeville scene touring with a medicine show with one of the most dangerous acts about how to discipline a prankster child. Joseph adopted the nickname ‘Buster’ given to him by up and coming Illusionist Harry Houdini himself. Keatons father threw his son down a flight of stairs, where the Illusionist would pick up and dust off the young unharmed boy, referring to the fall as a “buster”.

Business savvy Joe Keaton recognized the appeal of a great show name. Developing in showbiz would lead a young Keaton to search for work in New York where Buster met successful film star and director Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbunkle. This led to Buster being cast in a short The Butcher Boy in 1917, an appearance that would launch Buster Keaton’s film career.

A true individual, Buster would never hesitate if he saw potential for a laugh, whether through some kind of physical comedy stunt (often insisting to do his own stunts which wasn’t common at the time), or going as far as dressing in drag.  This showman brought a fresh spin to the fading Vaudville scene.

Always relevant with the keen sense to know times are a’ changin’, and with a clear baritone voice and stage past, he had nothing to fear over the inevitable transition  of silent movies to ‘talkies’ .   Buster  wanted to bring his signature style to a new generation.  He came to remake many of his past works from the directors chair with modern actors shot for shot.

Having an eclectic and interesting upbringing, style was never something to shy away from for Buster Keaton. Buster busted out of the box with his outlandish and fun fashion choices, be it a tailored tuxedo, or a disheveled clown get-up. His charm and wit always will resinate through his work.

“I gotta do some sad scenes. Why, I never tried to make anybody cry in my life! And I go ’round all the time dolled up in kippie clothes-wear everything but a corset . . . can’t stub my toe in this picture nor anything! Just imagine having to play-act all the time without ever getting hit with anything!”
Buster Keaton

Having battled his own demons being an alcoholic, as well as having some failed marriages under his belt. His personnel was riddled with up’s and down’s, as is the biz. He would come to have a few children from different wives, but it was in 1940, he met and married his third wife Eleanor Norris, who was deeply devoted to him, and remained his constant companion and partner until Keaton’s death.

He was deservedly honoured with an Honorary Academy Award in 1960 for his unique talents and contributions to the film industry. Buster really did have it all, and we think his star is still shining bright today. Special thanks to fuckyeahbusterkeaton who has a great tumblr full of great Buster content!

He passed away at his home, peacefully in his sleep, shortly after playing cards with his wife.

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+R.I.P.+

Here’s some stuff from {THE EYE OF FAITH SHOP} to conjure up the look!

++USE CODE XIXIXI for 25% OFF++

Until next time,

{theEye}

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Fancy and Folly: Giving Me The Silent Treatment

When I first saw the trailers for “The Artist“, shortly after it’s premier at the Cannes Film Festival that would lead to Jean Dujardin’s Best Actor win at the prestigious art festival, I was not impressed. Silly folly, I thought. Reductive (Thanks, Madonna). Wasted Inspiration. How could this “NEW” silent film set in th 20s really make a splash? There was no way, in my mind, that the audiences of 2011 would really appreciate the novelty…but surprisingly, they did!

Don’t know what it is about this one (as I’m still stubbornly NOT seeing it) that really taps a chord with everyone these days, but one thing is certain we have a hit on our hands! Picking up seven wins at the British Academy Awards last night, the film is continuing it’s unbeatable winning streak all the way to the Oscars.

Granted, the recreation of the 1920s looks great (especially costumes by first-time Academy Award nominee Mark Bridges, who painstakingly recreated designs from the 20s), not to mention Du Jardin’s charisma and winning smile, but there seems to be something so defeatist about watching a silent film made in 2012.

Why do I need to see this? I have seen many silent films, some of which are the most impressive pieces of film making, or dare I say ART, I’ve ever seen: “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” (1920), “Birth of a Nation”(1915) , “Intolerance”(1916), “The Gold Rush”(1925), “Metropolis”(1927), “Voyage to the Moon” (1902), and “Pandora’s Box” (1929) are all some of the most important films ever made, as well as full of some of the most visually arresting images of all time.

 

All these films were made before sound became an unstoppable force in making movies. Before this time, the power of image and word, and the novelty of the moving image was enough to begin a revolution that would become Hollywood. And don’t think that because these films were made without sound that they are PG fair, because most silent classics are full of adultery, scandal, ghosts, vampires, drugs, sex, violence, and witches- all the things we love at The Eye of Faith, minus the rock n’ roll!

Watching the films of that time are magical in itself, as it’s probablly the closest any of us could ever get to time travel in our lifetime. It’s fascinating getting lost in Louise Miller’s beautiful bow lips, or catching Valentino’s devilish gaze- these celluloid dreams are the closest thing we have to these faded idols of yesteryear and their long lonst lost time. Having been made on film, we are getting a literal imprint of a moment in time playing out before our eyes. Absolute magic!

Back in those days, they didn’t have any of the technology we have today to make movies- all you had was a team full of people and a whole lot of passion to try to tell your story. Even “The Artist” couldn’t escape from having the shoot the film first in Colour, to then digitally manipulate the film to the lauded black and white photogrpahy being praised today.

Back in the 1920s, there is no way they would have shot a film only to have to redo it completely somewhere else; if time meant money now, time really meant money in those days- but today in 2012, I’m afraid that time for these jewels only means edging closer and closer to obscurity.

Ultimately, it’s about love for movies in general. I cannot fault director Michel Hazanavicius’ vision, bringing his ode to Silent Era to the masses, and hopefully with it’s growing popularity the film can also bring some love to the real classics of the 1910s and 1920s. However, I can’t help but think “The Artist” may even further dampened our view of the true days of Hollywood Babylon. Reductive.

Many people, like myself, see all the promos for “The Artist” and can’t see past the gimmick of it all. (I mean, REALLY?!!) Hopefully this doesn’t taint the idea of watching a real classic- seeing as you can watch a “NEW” one. Or maybe I’m being much too cynical and everything is jolly! It’s great to see so much love for the past, in general though. Perhaps simply, the time of nostalgia has really struck.

Throughout the years, silent films have provided an endless source of inspiration. Luckily, many silent films are being restored and archived so future generations can enjoy the magic of the past. Watching a silent film, you can almost feel lucky, as if somehow you have found a hidden doorway to the past, and luckily you can stay there (at least for an hour or two).

Lest we forget from whence we came, and enjoy a piece of the puzzle today!

We’ve included a scene from 1928’s “The Laughing Man” (a precursor to Batman’s iconic villain The Joker) for your viewing pleasure.

[And if you have a lot of time on your hand OpenFlix on Youtube has a ton of Full Length classic films for Free including the 1922 Swedish Documentary HAXAN on the History of Witchcraft!!! Silent and Spooky. Click Here.]

Now you have a good trajectory. So, have fun!!!

[PORTLANDIA:SEASON 2]

 

Sincerely,
{theEye}

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