Tag Archives: vaudeville

Styling Orchards, the Band; Plus BONUS {MUSIC MINUTE} “Oh, Sister” by Orchards

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I learned long ago that when someone asks you to pull looks for a vaudeville circus inspired shoot, you do so!

Granted, I’ve never been asked to in this life, but something just tells you to jump at the opportunity when its right. We didn’t even have to question whether or not we wanted to be a part of this when the beautiful, and lovely (don’t forget talented) Jessica Panetta asked if we’d want to work together, and pull some looks to bring to a shoot for the city’s finest up-and-coming folk band, Orchards.

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Orchards comprises of Anthony William Wallace (violin, banjo), Daniel John Taylor (bass, guitar, ukulele), and Gabrielle Sylvane Charron-Merritt (trumpet, guitar) who are all uber-talented, fun, and highly multi-disciplinary artists who dove right into every scenario with gusto and poise.

Couldn’t have done it without my wardrobe partner, Heather English, who had a great eye for colour and detail (heart!) .

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Their music is haunting and eloquent with captivating melodies that evoke lost memories from deep within our collective consciousness. The songs are classic and utterly timeless bringing a modern twist to classic folk sounds. Needless to say, their music was the perfect inspiration for the shoot.

We played off the softness and decadent dishevelling of men and women seen in vintage photographs for the quieter moments, and looked for bold and intriguing colour and graphic combinations to complete the circus vibe.

All in all, I think the look completed is a nod to the past, but is completely reinvented – just like Orchard’s own music, which ultimately is the element we all hoped to showcase.

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Each shot is so great to look back on, as you remember it all happening – when it was moving, and there were sounds, and laughter, and distraction; not with a photograph. These are magic moments here, captured throughout.

Please enjoy the photographs, and definitely dive into the track below entitled “Oh,Sister” by Orchards for a true escape from the everyday . . .

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[ Click to listen to more Orchards at Bandcamp]

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[I told you the past can come back to life!]

We were so lucky to have such a talented team of individuals who all came together in symbiosis to make this vision come to life! Very proud to have been a part of it, and looking forward to what the future has in store . . .

Don’t forget to LIKE ORCHARDS on FACEBOOK, and share with all your friends!

Glad we could catch up!

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Until we meet again,

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {June 17, 2013}

EYE OF FAITH (VINTAGE)- Boxing Babies-  Curio Bizarro Photographia Major

A most curio bizarro . . .

+BOXING BABIES+

Is this right?

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“He’s just a CHILD?!”

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E.O.F. SNAPSHOT OF THE DAY {JUNE 14, 2013}

Bag Ladies Mask{The weekend is near, but who needs sunblock?? To maintain that milky complexion just use a paper bag! Vintage tips on beauty and more, only @TheEyeOfFaith !}

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Music/Movie Minute: Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t Followin’ The Boys (1944)

We we’re lured in with Louis Jordan & His Tympany Five’s rendition of Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t, yet we’ve discovered Follow the Boys from 1944 offers so much more!  Releasing morale-boosting movies full of huge and not-so huge stars to send over sea’s to Soldiers and to Patriots in America would constitute as a wartime effort from Major Film Studios during World War II.

Featuring everyone from Donald O’Connor to the Andrew Sisters to Orson Welles to W.C. Fields to George Raft to Marlene Dietrich, and dozens of the other Universal players, Follow the Boys is a ‘modern’ Vaudeville-esque extravaganza full of all kinds of performances to entertain, and we mildly believe that efforts such as this helped win the War.

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day [May 7/2012]

Barry Lategan for Vogue UK, April 1971


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Ventriloquy: That, Dummy, Ain’t Funny!

Sometimes the thought of a porcelain doll could make us jump into our bed and hide under the covers.  But today we want to bring attention to the forgotten art of Ventriloquy.

Yes, once upon a time, people didn’t just use dolls to instill fear in small children and grown up alike.  There was a time when performing with a doll was a science! It was a huge part of the world of Vaudeville.  To bewilder and astound audiences with trained voices that could not be explained, and techniques and tactics to amuse and delight!

The first known use of Ventriloquy was back in 1584 if you’d believe it! Originally, ventriloquism was a religious practice. The name comes from the Latin ‘for to speak from the stomach’.  The Greeks called this gastromancy.  The noises produced by the stomach were thought to be the voices of the unliving, who took up residence in the stomach of the ventriloquist. The ventriloquist would then interpret the sounds, as they were thought to be able to speak to the dead, as well as foretell the future.

Naturally, the practice of interpreting sounds made by the human body after death was not so natural for most.  Manipulating a corpse to mimic speaking left most instinctively offended, and the whole art came off as ‘eerie’.  As a matter of fact, in the Middle Ages, Ventriloquism was thought to be similar to witchcraft.  As Spiritualism led to stage magic and escapology, ventriloquism became more of a performance art.  By the 19th Century it shed its mystical roots and has since become the freaky dummy play we know and love today.


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E.O.F. Style Icon: Buster Keaton

Known as the ‘Great Stone Face’, standing at an astounding 5’5″ we honour a style icon, Buster Keaton. Unconventional, timeless, and one of a kind comedic sensibility, this man’s legacy is more than just dissolving film and a steely gaze. From a time where men had to be men, Buster found a spot for himself amongst film royalty, with a unique perspective to comedy, and a whimsy to his overall performance nobody could replicate. Watching old reels of this pro, we know we’re witnessing true magic.

“Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot.”
Buster Keaton

“Silence is of the gods; only monkeys chatter.”
Buster Keaton

Born Joseph Frank Keaton VI, by Vaudville performer parents Joe Keaton and Myra Keaton in Piqua, Kansas on October 4, 1895. The family soon came to tour the Vaudeville scene touring with a medicine show with one of the most dangerous acts about how to discipline a prankster child. Joseph adopted the nickname ‘Buster’ given to him by up and coming Illusionist Harry Houdini himself. Keatons father threw his son down a flight of stairs, where the Illusionist would pick up and dust off the young unharmed boy, referring to the fall as a “buster”.

Business savvy Joe Keaton recognized the appeal of a great show name. Developing in showbiz would lead a young Keaton to search for work in New York where Buster met successful film star and director Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbunkle. This led to Buster being cast in a short The Butcher Boy in 1917, an appearance that would launch Buster Keaton’s film career.

A true individual, Buster would never hesitate if he saw potential for a laugh, whether through some kind of physical comedy stunt (often insisting to do his own stunts which wasn’t common at the time), or going as far as dressing in drag.  This showman brought a fresh spin to the fading Vaudville scene.

Always relevant with the keen sense to know times are a’ changin’, and with a clear baritone voice and stage past, he had nothing to fear over the inevitable transition  of silent movies to ‘talkies’ .   Buster  wanted to bring his signature style to a new generation.  He came to remake many of his past works from the directors chair with modern actors shot for shot.

Having an eclectic and interesting upbringing, style was never something to shy away from for Buster Keaton. Buster busted out of the box with his outlandish and fun fashion choices, be it a tailored tuxedo, or a disheveled clown get-up. His charm and wit always will resinate through his work.

“I gotta do some sad scenes. Why, I never tried to make anybody cry in my life! And I go ’round all the time dolled up in kippie clothes-wear everything but a corset . . . can’t stub my toe in this picture nor anything! Just imagine having to play-act all the time without ever getting hit with anything!”
Buster Keaton

Having battled his own demons being an alcoholic, as well as having some failed marriages under his belt. His personnel was riddled with up’s and down’s, as is the biz. He would come to have a few children from different wives, but it was in 1940, he met and married his third wife Eleanor Norris, who was deeply devoted to him, and remained his constant companion and partner until Keaton’s death.

He was deservedly honoured with an Honorary Academy Award in 1960 for his unique talents and contributions to the film industry. Buster really did have it all, and we think his star is still shining bright today. Special thanks to fuckyeahbusterkeaton who has a great tumblr full of great Buster content!

He passed away at his home, peacefully in his sleep, shortly after playing cards with his wife.

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+R.I.P.+

Here’s some stuff from {THE EYE OF FAITH SHOP} to conjure up the look!

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Until next time,

{theEye}

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