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{HOW-TO} Vintage Style Inspiration : Jonny Quest !

original hannah barbara - johnny quest and villains sheet- vintage summer style inspiration - adventure cool

It seems Summer is finally here, and with the warming weather we are sure to find ourselves in the midst of more and more adventure as the season rolls on.

Yes indeed, and probably for many, the joys of the Summer heat are sure to incite one or many exciting and unexpected journeys and voyages.

Whether they be jet setting the globe, or simply hopping the hoods of your own town or city, a true adventurer knows that as much as anything that looking good and feeling great on your exciting expedition is as much the fun as averting danger and uncovering sinister ploys against humanity . . .

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So we couldn’t NOT visit the ultra-cool, hip, and happening, bad-ass, crime-fighting, science seeking, gun toting, mid-century realness of one we have always so admired- Mr. Jonny Quest.

Jonny starred in his own television series, created by Hannah Barbara (the folks that brought you “The Flinstones” and “The Jetsons“), called “Jonny Quest” which premiered in 1964 and would run for two seasons, ending in 1965.

Jonny Quest Fights Back

The blonde boy in black and blue is indeed an unmatched original, with his sophisticated turban-wearing side-kick Hadji at his side, and his adorable pal Bandit; the two kick-ass kidsters found themselves against everything from ninjas, mummies, and giant robot spiders, to pterodactyls, and knife wielding scuba divers.

With careful wit, precise execution, charm, and a bit of luck they always seem to manage. . .

 

jonny quest- the family

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Also along for the ride, and taking part in festivities, are the equally style savvy father of Jonny, Dr. Quest, and his hunky white haired “bodyguard”, Race Bannon. Race is a strong and physical war vet who likes to spend his off-time in a bikini on the beach, while Dr. Quest takes his handsome ginger beard and lab coat inside to research new advancements in engineering, chemistry, and physics.

Race Bannon on the beach

They make a great couple, if you ask me. And they take such great care of the kids (when they’re not putting them plain into the face of danger). . .

But, apart from the bizarre family dynamics described above, there’s no doubting that Jonny Quest has what it takes to be a bold and sophisticated taste-maker of today and tomorrow with his impeccably simple and classic get-up; one that can easily be recreated for yourself!

CHECK IT OUT!

jonny quest vintage style - t by alexander wang chunky knit turtleneck from opening ceremony-1

Though, there are plenty of options out there, the one that stood out for us was this Chunky Wool Knit Turtleneck by T BY ALEXANDER WANG ($265), because of its thicker knit that adds a bit more to the number. It doesn’t have to cling to your body. A comfortable and relaxed fit is best, especially in the summer. {source: OPENING CEREMONY}

bellfield cabrera 5pkt jean- top man

For the pants, we wanted to stay as close to Jonny’s light-blue washed denim look he has in the cartoon. With all the adventures he has been on, we figured this washed out and distressed look works great for achieving that true adventure spirit. We think we found the perfect pair here from Topman – The Bellfield Cabrera 5-Pocket Jean (£40.00).

5 Pockets are perfect for storing skeleton keys, pencils, chewing gum, notepads, compasses, anecdotes, pocket knives – all those things young adventurers would need for a good day of adventuring. Roll up the cuffs to stay truest to our vintage inspiration.

Mens Original Champion White Keds 1

And last but not least, the shoes. Looks like our Jonny Quest look is almost complete! But not before we pick out the perfect pair of white sneakers to round out the look. Since Keds are so classic, and really became popular around Jonny’s time (the early 1960s), I can just picture Jonny kicking up his heels and running straight from whatever was chasing him in a pair of these puppies. They are always super affordable, durable, and timeless.

We went for the classic Keds Men’s Champion Originals in White ($45), because that’s just how our inspiration, Jonny Quest would do it.

And that’s it! It was that easy. Now, the adventuring can begin, and vintage style can yet again win! ! !

 

If it aint broke, don’t fix it, they always say. The same thing goes for style. When we look back to the past at a great thing like Jonny Quest, we can’t help but let our style motors run on overdrive at the potential for greatness today with some of their amazing midcentury atomic takes on classic American sportswear and utilitarianism.

Everything about the cartoon was groundbreaking for the time, so in our heart we find ourselves beating to that same rebel beat, and wanting to keep this heritage alive and well. The graphic nature of the cartoon made for a revolutionary look on the screen (jet black was rarely used and never as heavily as before “Jonny Quest“, and the uber jazzy soundtrack was also another selling point towards a radical and refined new take on the adventure genre.

No doubt, a viewer could find new ideas and stories to tantalize and spark the imagination each and every time they watched the show, but very rarely are the characters’ unique and sophisticated sense of style brought to the forefront in this way.

That’s why we thought it important to see out this vintage style inspiration, the Jonny Quest way.

Lest we forget!

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SHOP THE {SHOP}!!! 

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AND ALWAYS!!!

GO ON YOUR OWN ADVENTURE . . .

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Until next time,

{theEye}

 

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Krampus Christmas Time! Santa’s Personal Devil Side-Kick Might Just Be Visiting a House Near You . . .

Krampus4

You better not shout. You better not cry. You better not pout, I’m telling you why . . . Krampus is coming to town!

That’s right, kids! Hide under your blankets, and seal your window tight, because this Holiday Season not only calls for the arrival of our good friend St. Nick, but along with the classic jolly do-gooder also comes his hungry devil friend!

No, my words are not tied. You heard it right! A devil friend! Every year for many hundreds of years, European tradition has depicted a very cruel and very hideous counterpart to Santa known as Krampus.

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Krampus is pretty much your stereotypical vision of the devil: red fur, horns, claws, even a weird sick little tongue he likes to stick out. Best part of all is he likes to carry around chains to beat and whip the kids that get in his way!!!

Throughout Northern Italy, Austria, and other parts of Europe, people celebrate Krampusnacht in honor of this holiday beast. Party-goers dress up as demons, devils, and witches, masquerading through the town intoxicated and terrifying adults and children, alike!

Gruppenbild Geigelstoa Pass Schleching

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Many people believe this tradition dates back thousands of years to Pagan traditions where both Krampus and Santa Clause can be seen in the archetypes of Old Man Winter and the Goat-Man. This must also be part of the whole SANTA = SATAN mythology.

Krampus isn’t a character you see anymore in the mainstream, but during the 19th Century and early 20th Century a huge craze for Krampus Greeting Cards swept Europe.

Surreal and a little cheeky, there is no avoiding the grim horror of such a devil beast actually torturing and even eating children for Christmas! But, seeing as this is The Eye of Faith, we thought some of these cards would be the perfect thing to share with our readers, and perhaps we may even start to see a resurgence! (This would make Krampus very happy . . .)

{Special Thanks to Morbid Anatomy for some of the Krampus pics . . . }

I always thought something was missing to the story of Christmas. Now it all seems to make (a bit more) sense . . .

Don’t forget to share these with your friends, and for more images and to learn more about the traditions of Krampus, please visit the official site!

Thanks for reading, and Happy Holidays!

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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God is in the Details: Revealing the Early Renaissance @AGOToronto

Revealing the Renaissance at the AGO - secrets in florentine art - the Peruzzi Altar Piece

Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art (March 16 – June 16, 2013)

ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO (317 Dundas Street West)

$25 adult admission (includes admission to the rest of the gallery)

When thinking of the Renaissance, one might automatically conjure up images of Da Vinci, his Vetruvian man, and Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel. It is a period in history renowned for its surge of creativity, knowledge, and innovation in areas of art, literature, music, architecture, and science.

It is a period that is also become more and more in vogue due to its resurgence in popular culture with T.V. shows like “The Tudors”, “The Borgias”, and the upcoming “Da Vinci’s Demons”, all putting their spin to this exciting and important moment in history.

But, what is rarely captured is the true birth of this period, and the movers and shakers who brought it all to life.

Perhaps its the fact that most art historians do not even know the names of most of the incredible artisans who painstakingly brought the churches of Florence to life with incredibly illuminated manuscripts, carvings, stained glass windows, and beautifully detailed panel paintings, between the years 1300 and 1350, that truly did start it all.

Revealing the renaissance: stories and secrets in florentine art

This is what Sasha Suda and the curators of the Art Gallery of Ontario‘s latest exhibition, “Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art“, aim to bring to the forefront, allowing visitors to explore the lost masterworks that truly sparked a revolution, and would change the face of history forever.

In partnership with the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the curators have painstakingly worked on this exhibition for the past 10 years, travelling far and wide to analyze and bring overseas for the first time some of the most elaborate examples of work from this period that define the breaking point from the flatness of Medieval art to a more expressive and “humanized” perspective that has come to characterize the Renaissance.

Many of these pieces have been shut away from the public for centuries, making this one of the most impressive exhibits the AGO has ever premiered, and one that is sure to capture the imagination of all those lucky enough to visit.

The main gallery at Revealing the early renaissance- stories and secrets in florentine art - AGO- March 12, 2013

Sasha Suda Talks Art With Culture Minister Michael Chan

Curator Sasha Suda talks art with Michael Chan, Ontario Minister of Culture, Tourism, & Sport.  

One might, at first, be intimidated by the prestige of such an exhibit, but fear not, as this portal on the past is as much a reflection of our present day, as it is the 14th Century.

Whether or not you know a great deal about Renaissance art, the exhibition is packed full of information, from the audio guide, to the i-pads strategically placed amongst the exhibition to give you the full backstory on some of the exhibition’s most intriguing pieces. The curators have created an easy to understand story, that truly captures all the excitement and mystery of the artists and the works they created amidst the social context of Florence during this period.

Detail of the Peruzzi Altarpiece - christ wounds- revealing the early renaissance: stories and secrets in florentine art at the AGORevealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO -

God is in the Details . . .

As you first step into the gallery, it may not immediately strike you how these works differ from the Medieval illustrations and paintings you are used to, but upon closer examination, you will find how rich, textured, and full of emotion each piece truly is.

They are not works of art to be admired from afar, but works that deserve an acute eye, and a willingness to get lost in the stories being told within them.

There is a certain excitement generated as you begin to see the layers of colour, and painstakingly small brush strokes that capture the most miniscule details of hair and embroidery. While our culture might be used to multiple images rapidly flashing before our eyes (surely a luxury akin to witchcraft for the men and women of the Renaissance), one must note that the multi-faceted panels and illuminated manuscripts are akin to the cinema of the Renaissance, with all the drama, suspense, horror, and spectacle you could expect from a film of today, with even a bit of special effects here and there.

Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO

An exquisite panel painting. Blood, gore, and devotion. The piece reads almost like an expensive 14th Century comic . . .

It”s all for devotion sake, of course; used to invoke prayer, meditation, deep-thought, or contemplation. There’s definitely that sense of entertainment in the midst, often showcasing the more brutal and tumultuous moments of martyrs and Christ: Agatha with her breasts being cut off, another martyr is grilled on coals in ecstasy, and check out any crucified Christ in the mix and you’re bound to see more than your year’s worth of blood squirt (the most impressive, hands down, being Pacino Di Bonaguido’s “The Crucifixion” from 1315-1320, whose flowing blood rains on the spectators of the scene, as well as a juicy squirt from the chest for the viewer).

The Crucifixion by Pacino Bonaguida at the AGO - March 12, 2013 - Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and secrets in florentine art Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO - Detail of Bonaguida's "THE CRUCIFIXION"

Pacino De Bonaguida’s “The Crucifixion” and Detail of (1315-1320)

And while, we might cringe at the sight of this, its patrons felt the bloodshed and pain was the human aspect of their faith, and that one day perhaps, they may themselves reach divination, as did their faithful predecessors.

Getting lost in each piece, you begin to see that this society was obsessed with their idols, and their chance to be a part of them was as easy as getting a master to paint them into a panel or manuscript. In essence, it equated a wealthy merchant to the status of celebrity, having made his way onto the pages alongside the kingdom of heaven complete with Christ, the Virgin, and all the many martyrs who gave their life to the dedication of their fate.

The most entertaining example of this is the Laudario of Sant’Agnesse; an illuminated choir book commissioned by the Compagnia di Sant’Agnese, a fraternity of merchants, for use in charitable events and prayer, and who are also illustrated along the margins of the music. This remarkable collection of 24 illustrated manuscripts have been framed and reunited for the first time since the early 1800s, and will be performed by musical guests Lionheart on April 6 in the Walker Court of the AGO (click for more details).

Detail of Daddi's "Crowned Virgin Martyr" - Revealin ghte Early Renaissance at the AGO - Toronto

Detail of “A Crowned Virgin Martyr {Catherine of Alexandria}” (1334 – 1338) by Bernardo Daddi. 

It is amazing to think that at one time, masters like Botticelli, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Michelangelo must have set their gaze on these exact works to hone their own craft, and garner inspiration to create the masterpieces of the Renaissance we marvel at today. For when staring at the suggestive expression of Bernardo Daddi’s “A Crowned Virgin Martyr” (1334-1338), a glimpse of Da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa”  with her mysterious stare, and face full of subtle shadows that delicately sculpt her face, can definitely be seen,  which make the exhibition all the more exciting, and relevant.

In many ways, the exhibition brings to light that not much has changed in the world of art and commerce; citing the importance of banking and the prosperous merchant class to the creation of these vital works of art. Being so wealthy, members of the merchant class became so concerned that they may not  reach heaven, that they began spending their fortunes on commissioning buildings, and filling them with new art that expressed their hopes, fears, ideals, and emotions.

Revealing the Early Renaissance at the AGO-A view of Bernardo Daddi Italian The Martyrdom of Saint Ursula and 11,000 Virgins

With prosperity, comes art – and not much has changed today, as many of the world’s most successful artists rely on wealthy investors and corporate big wigs to the cut the cheque on a commission. Perhaps they no longer fear purgatory for their sins, but they are most definitely keeping their fingers crossed that their commission could strike them big dollars, and in that way, achieve idol status, and a bit of heaven.

The exhibition has already been lauded by the Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times as one of the most important exhibitions in recent years, so don’t miss out on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to travel through time, and take in 90 once-hidden masterworks that came to redefine life as we know it today.

Agony and the Ecstacy - Blood and Gore - Revealing the Early Renaissance at the AGO

All the Agony & The Ecstacy . . .

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Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art” opens at the AGO on March 16 and runs until June 16, 2013. To book your tickets today, click here!

Also be sure to check out the event schedule at the AGO for exciting insights inspired by this latest exhibit (Click here).

Sasha Suda, Michael Chan (Ontario Minister of Culture), and CEO at the AGO, Matthew Teitelbaum - March 12, 2013 - AGO Press Preview

Matthew Teitelbaum (CEO at the AGO), Sasha Suda (Assistant Curator of European art at the AGO), and Michael Chan (Ontario Minister of Culture, Tourism, & Sport) – March 12, 2013. 

Until next time,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {September 11, 2012}

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{Strange Goings On, and a Skeleton in a Wheelchair. The comic you read as a kid under the sheets…}

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Commercial Break: Basket Case (1982)

A country bumpkin Duane arrives in New York City with he, himself, and his basket!? We soon learn the contents of the basket is actually a surgically removed and freakishly deformed Siamese twin, doctors shudder to even call human. Fueled by revenge against anyone they can blame, the killing spree ensues. Until, Duane gets his first date with a receptionist. Now wanting to start a new positive life, the freak twin escapes his basket.

With the tagline “The tenant in room 7 is very small, very twisted and very mad.”, we here at the Eye are amused and horrified. If you think you have the stomach for it, watch this Bonus Clip from Basket Case.

The Eye.

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Commercial Break: “The Stuff” (1985)

We were horrified when we witnessed what happens to a person when they digest the ‘delicious’ “Stuff”. Written and directed by Larry Cohen, a story based on a mysterious goop found by miners digging in the pits of the Earth, tasted, then was suspiciously marketed to the country! This beyond campy gore horror is a great addition to the freak out flicks that emerged from the 1980s. If you think you have the stomach for it, check out the clip below.

There goes our appetite.
The Eye.
xx.

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American Hunk

Shocking, bloody, upbeat, vulgar, disturbing, outrageously 80s, misogynistic, and aspirational?? Too many adjectives could describe the story of the American Psycho. With rumblings of a remake, we take a moment to remember the performance of Christian Bale as the psychotic Patrick Bateman and recognize the instant cult classic film set in the 1980s from 2000.

Originated as a novel in 1991 by Bret Easton Ellis, the idea of a rich Manhattan businessman that took too much pleasure in his own violent vices. Written mostly as a drafted story, all of the explicit scenes of violence did not come until the book was almost finished. Ellis spent a lot of time researching gruesome murders at the New York Public Library to help paint a the violent picture.

“[Bateman] was crazy the same way [I was]. He did not come out of me sitting down and wanting to write a grand sweeping indictment of yuppie culture. It initiated because my own isolation and alienation at a point in my life. I was living like Patrick Bateman. I was slipping into a consumerist kind of void that was supposed to give me confidence and make me feel good about myself but just made me feel worse and worse and worse about myself. That is where the tension of “American Psycho” came from. It wasn’t that I was going to make up this serial killer on Wall Street. High concept. Fantastic. It came from a much more personal place, and that’s something that I’ve only been admitting in the last year or so. I was so on the defensive because of the reaction to that book that I wasn’t able to talk about it on that level.”   -Bret Easton Ellis

Ellis has taken any stereotype of a killer, and reinvented fear using the American dream. Obsessed with beauty and youth, armed with an iced sleeping mask, tanning bed, chainsaw, designer suits, and love of pop music, the character of Patrick Bateman surely redefines what’s expected from a Sociopath.

We know Christian Bale can pull of any role, but to see the bad boy pull off the over tanned, and toned yuppie American style of Patrick Bateman is a real treat. His American accent, which could be one of the faults to this film, becomes an endearing quality, adding to the overall over-the-top-ness of the whole damn movie!

The aesthetic of this film is one of the major reasons why people keep talking about “American Psycho”. Since it’s set in the 1980s, many elements come into play. With productuon design by Gideon Ponte and Jeanne Develle as the set decorator, every scene is as blatantly expensive and 80’s-tastic as the last. We get a clear sense of the O.C.D. nature of Patrick Bateman in the first glance of the film, with a panning shot of his sterile trendy living room.

Style resonates from every scene of this movie, whether it be Bale in a blood soaked plastic raincoat, or Bale getting a migraine from the mundane in a chic suit. We hope people aren’t reading this and fantasizing about what they could do to a prostitute with a chainsaw, but taking notice of the fashion. While this guy was becoming blood hungry and more and more unhinged, people around him were taking note on how great he looked in designer duds.

We can find the American Psycho style on runways all over the world today. Maybe in the form of some splattered blood on a chest, or an executioners mask wearing model in leather, you could pin the influence to many historical figures or idea’s, but we see Patrick Bateman.



The film got the sequel treatment in 2002, in American psycho 2, starring no other than the Black Swan herself, Mila Kunis. And in 2008, development of a broadway musical based on the novel and film began. Duncan Sheik, a Tony and Grammy Award-winner for the Broadway smash Spring Awakening, is partway through writing the music and lyrics for American Psycho: The Musical, while playwright Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa is in the midst of penning the book.

So can crazy be sexy? Or the biggest turn off? Maybe it’s just Christian Bale, or all the nude shower scenes, but we are turned on.
Su Su Sudio,
-The Eye xx

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