Tag Archives: wartime

{MUSIC MINUTE} MURDER He Says! Betty Hutton cries out loud.

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Growing up in the dirty thirties, with a rough and tough childhood, our lady crooner has been through a lot more than most have to experience!

Bouncing around from city to city through her childhood gave this woman real tenacity.  Money troubles abound kept her family on their toes, shifting from town to town running away from the Police.

She had a father who walked out on her family to runaway with another woman, and the only word again from him was a telegram alerting the family of Mr. Hutton’s suicide.

Maybe her irreverence to her father helped fuel her fire for this tune.  Betty does her rendition of ‘Murder he says’ in 1943, and we are moved!! We’ve love her styling of ANY song , and we are suckers for her straight-shooting bluntness and of course  we’d love any tune that cries out ‘MURDER’.

Don’t forget: KARAOKE CABARET TUESDAY tonight at 8:30p!! Hosted by yours truly . . .

E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {August 31, 2012}

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+ {Back 2 School Memories of the Posh Mess Hall at Yale University. Circa 1942} +

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Music/Movie Minute: Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t Followin’ The Boys (1944)

We we’re lured in with Louis Jordan & His Tympany Five’s rendition of Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t, yet we’ve discovered Follow the Boys from 1944 offers so much more!  Releasing morale-boosting movies full of huge and not-so huge stars to send over sea’s to Soldiers and to Patriots in America would constitute as a wartime effort from Major Film Studios during World War II.

Featuring everyone from Donald O’Connor to the Andrew Sisters to Orson Welles to W.C. Fields to George Raft to Marlene Dietrich, and dozens of the other Universal players, Follow the Boys is a ‘modern’ Vaudeville-esque extravaganza full of all kinds of performances to entertain, and we mildly believe that efforts such as this helped win the War.

The Eye.

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Happy Birthday Howard Carter! (9 May 1874 – 2 March 1939)

Howard Carter was born in London, England, the son of Samuel Carter, a skilled artist, who trained him to follow in his footsteps, and Martha Joyce (Sands) Carter.  Born eager and inquisitive, at 17, the young talented artist was sent out by the Egypt Exploration Fund to assist Percy Newberry in the excavation and recording of Middle Kingdom tombs at Beni Hasan.  Even at that young age he was innovative in improving the methods of copying tomb decoration.

On 4 November 1922, Carter’s excavation group found the steps leading to Tutankhamun‘s tomb ,  by far the best preserved and most intact pharaonic tomb ever found in the Valley of the Kings.

Carter made the “tiny breach in the top left hand corner” of the doorway, and was able to peer in by the light of a candle and see that many of the gold and ebony treasures were still in place. He made the breach into the tomb with a chisel his grandmother had given him for his seventeenth birthday. He did not yet know at that point whether it was “a tomb or merely a cache”, but he did see a promising sealed doorway between two sentinel statues. When Carnarvon asked “can you see anything?”, Carter replied with the famous words: “Yes, wonderful things.”

The Eye.

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