Tag Archives: twenties

E.O.F. SNAPSHOT OF THE DAY {DECEMBER 6, 2016}

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+Damn, son. . . +

Photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson {circa. 1933}

by George Hoyningen-Heune  //seminal art photography of the 1920s & 30s

Stay {STYLE-WISE}

Until next time,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. SNAPSHOT OF THE DAY {NOVEMBER 30, 2016}

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1920s bad ass Paris bedroom interior. 

exotic art luxe. 

All that we see or seem
Is but a dream within a dream.

Edgar Allen Poe,  A Dream Within A Dream

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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{PHOTOBLAST} Do What Thou Wilt . . . [ 11.15.13 / Vintage Photographic Inspiration]

EOF Photoblast- Do What Thou Wilt - The Truth is in the Dirt on the Ground (1940s Snapshot)

+ “Do What Thou Wilt”+

Famous lines spoken by this century’s supreme occultist and libertarian muse, Aleister Crowley. It expresses the very nature of living which is to indulge in one’s senses, and even become one with one’s vices to create a total engagement with oneself that is far apart from self criticism, judgement, or nagging conflict.

It’s a pervasively positive outlook on life, really; one that begs you to be free. The most unique thing you can be, really, is yourself, and no God or society should hold that against you. It’s your right.

sgt-peppers-lonely-hearts-club-band

It is a philosophy embraced by millions around the world, and a magic realist way of living that has influenced countless art forms in the last century; most especially music, with Crowley being a inspiration to The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, Led Zeppelin, The Doors, and countless numbers of heavy metal rock groups.

It’s a doctrine as old as time itself, really, and with the re-release of Crowley’s Original Wax Recordings by Mr. Suit we felt it to be the perfect inspiration for a little vintage photographic inspiration- {PHOTOBLAST}, as we like to call it here, at The Eye of Faith.

After all, it’s been a long while since we’ve featured one of our timeless collages of vintage musings on the site, and just thought- you know what, you guys are worth it!!

So, please, whatever you do- ENJOY!

And, always remember

“Do What Thou Wilt”,

whatever you do.

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Don’t forget to check out all our other {PHOTOBLAST}s using the category sidebar on your left!

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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{Monday Music Minute} Annette Hanshaw’s “Pagan Love Song”

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Known as “The Personality Girl”, Annette Hanshaw was a popular chanteuse of the 1920s who brought a modern spirit to the classic ingenue. She was signed with Pathe records, and later married label executive Herman Rose, effectively retiring from entertainment altogether.

While for many years it was believed the actress had begun her singing career shortly after her 16th birthday, it has been recently revealed that, in fact, Hanshaw was born in 1901, and not 1910, making her 25 at the time of her first recording in 1926.

The wonderful, beautiful, gorgeous, Annette Hanshaw

She was a prolific performer (with over 780 recordings!), and made records under dozens of pseudonyms including Gay Ellis for sentimental songs, Dot Dare and Patsy Young (for Betty Boop impressions), as well as Ethel Bingham, Marion Lee, Janet Shaw, and Lelia Sandford. And while she made an attempt at a comeback later in her life, the demos were never released.

We bring you now her 1929 classic “Pagan Love Song” to drift away with, and help enjoy the day. . . her voice is the pinnacle of that 1920s sound, and is as fresh and true as ever. It’s the perfect song for these hot and lazy summer days.

Please enjoy, and look for more of Annette Hanshaw‘s wonderful recordings (we are blessed to have them) !

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Until we meet again,

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{MUSIC MINUTE} “I’m Doing What I’m Doing For Love” – Teddy Kline and His Orchestra ft. The Two Jazzers

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{1920s German Magazine Cover Illustration}

Been in the 1920s German Weimar Dirty Decadence kind-of-mood lately and can’t shake it!

Found this gem last night, and wanted to share it on the site. It’s been a while since we had a good old fashioned {MUSIC MINUTE} (granted our last {STYLE WISE} was also a {MUSIC MINUTE}) –  but here’s another gem for your listening pleasure.

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{Sublime & Disturbing – Otto Dix}

It’s called “I’m Doing What I’m Doing for Love” by Teddy Kline and His Orchestra ft. The Two Jazzers. Especially with the release of this year’s “The Great Gatsby” (was that good? I can’t decide), I expect to see more and more of the 1920s seep into our everyday so be warned! Best get into the mood with a mean hot jazz tune like this one which beats the shit out of any of the jazz mixes in “The Great Gatsby” soundtrack.

I wish it had been more like the Mia Farrow/Robert Redford version, but that’s a whole other post . . . the point is, I began to realize a song like this would have been the same kind of hit pop tune that today we’d be all into for a month and then move on to the next . . .

Hoping this helps it from being forgotten! And I’m going to find more cool stuff like this to share in the {FUTURE}

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 Until next time…

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This is How They Do. “Come Into The Water” (1929)

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“I don’t mind giving money to orphans, but I draw the line at working for them.”

Oh, the 1920s, how I love thee so. You must check out this incredibly silly, weird, and wonderful crazy flapper beach ballet to the tune “Come into the Water”. The ladies are rehearsing tirelessly for the upcoming Orphans’ Benefit.

The clip starts off with some impressively fluid camera movement along the bustling shoreline, revealing all the beach fun that could be had in 1929 including beach volleyball and the charleston! Some things never change . . .

It’s just a short clip, this one. Just enough to make you smile. Check it out!

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {February 14, 2013}

EOF- Happy Valentines Day- 2013- Vintage Black and White Postcard - 1920s

{Kiss The Girl}

Happy Valentine’s Day! Be Sweet to Your Sweetheart!

Le Coup de Foudre

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Fancy and Folly: Giving Me The Silent Treatment

When I first saw the trailers for “The Artist“, shortly after it’s premier at the Cannes Film Festival that would lead to Jean Dujardin’s Best Actor win at the prestigious art festival, I was not impressed. Silly folly, I thought. Reductive (Thanks, Madonna). Wasted Inspiration. How could this “NEW” silent film set in th 20s really make a splash? There was no way, in my mind, that the audiences of 2011 would really appreciate the novelty…but surprisingly, they did!

Don’t know what it is about this one (as I’m still stubbornly NOT seeing it) that really taps a chord with everyone these days, but one thing is certain we have a hit on our hands! Picking up seven wins at the British Academy Awards last night, the film is continuing it’s unbeatable winning streak all the way to the Oscars.

Granted, the recreation of the 1920s looks great (especially costumes by first-time Academy Award nominee Mark Bridges, who painstakingly recreated designs from the 20s), not to mention Du Jardin’s charisma and winning smile, but there seems to be something so defeatist about watching a silent film made in 2012.

Why do I need to see this? I have seen many silent films, some of which are the most impressive pieces of film making, or dare I say ART, I’ve ever seen: “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” (1920), “Birth of a Nation”(1915) , “Intolerance”(1916), “The Gold Rush”(1925), “Metropolis”(1927), “Voyage to the Moon” (1902), and “Pandora’s Box” (1929) are all some of the most important films ever made, as well as full of some of the most visually arresting images of all time.

 

All these films were made before sound became an unstoppable force in making movies. Before this time, the power of image and word, and the novelty of the moving image was enough to begin a revolution that would become Hollywood. And don’t think that because these films were made without sound that they are PG fair, because most silent classics are full of adultery, scandal, ghosts, vampires, drugs, sex, violence, and witches- all the things we love at The Eye of Faith, minus the rock n’ roll!

Watching the films of that time are magical in itself, as it’s probablly the closest any of us could ever get to time travel in our lifetime. It’s fascinating getting lost in Louise Miller’s beautiful bow lips, or catching Valentino’s devilish gaze- these celluloid dreams are the closest thing we have to these faded idols of yesteryear and their long lonst lost time. Having been made on film, we are getting a literal imprint of a moment in time playing out before our eyes. Absolute magic!

Back in those days, they didn’t have any of the technology we have today to make movies- all you had was a team full of people and a whole lot of passion to try to tell your story. Even “The Artist” couldn’t escape from having the shoot the film first in Colour, to then digitally manipulate the film to the lauded black and white photogrpahy being praised today.

Back in the 1920s, there is no way they would have shot a film only to have to redo it completely somewhere else; if time meant money now, time really meant money in those days- but today in 2012, I’m afraid that time for these jewels only means edging closer and closer to obscurity.

Ultimately, it’s about love for movies in general. I cannot fault director Michel Hazanavicius’ vision, bringing his ode to Silent Era to the masses, and hopefully with it’s growing popularity the film can also bring some love to the real classics of the 1910s and 1920s. However, I can’t help but think “The Artist” may even further dampened our view of the true days of Hollywood Babylon. Reductive.

Many people, like myself, see all the promos for “The Artist” and can’t see past the gimmick of it all. (I mean, REALLY?!!) Hopefully this doesn’t taint the idea of watching a real classic- seeing as you can watch a “NEW” one. Or maybe I’m being much too cynical and everything is jolly! It’s great to see so much love for the past, in general though. Perhaps simply, the time of nostalgia has really struck.

Throughout the years, silent films have provided an endless source of inspiration. Luckily, many silent films are being restored and archived so future generations can enjoy the magic of the past. Watching a silent film, you can almost feel lucky, as if somehow you have found a hidden doorway to the past, and luckily you can stay there (at least for an hour or two).

Lest we forget from whence we came, and enjoy a piece of the puzzle today!

We’ve included a scene from 1928’s “The Laughing Man” (a precursor to Batman’s iconic villain The Joker) for your viewing pleasure.

[And if you have a lot of time on your hand OpenFlix on Youtube has a ton of Full Length classic films for Free including the 1922 Swedish Documentary HAXAN on the History of Witchcraft!!! Silent and Spooky. Click Here.]

Now you have a good trajectory. So, have fun!!!

[PORTLANDIA:SEASON 2]

 

Sincerely,
{theEye}

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