Tag Archives: psychology

Setting Up For Satan: Fresh Design Tips for a New “Aeon”

“Rosemary’s Baby” remains one of the single most affecting, and stylish films to ever grace the silver screen. Based on the bestselling novel by Ira Levin (“The Stepford Wives”), the film serves up the frightening tale of an innocent young couple pulled deep into a darkness once imaginable in the heart of New York City.

Many argue the darkness still purveys more than ever in urban sprawls all over the world. No longer should you fear the woods at night, as much as the threat of our own neighbours, and the things we can’t see, that has begun to send shivers up your spine. As Gary Indiana of the Village Voice describes:

“The movie appeared at a moment of optimum spiritual chaos in American life. Rosemary’s Baby remains an iconic memory trace of a time when anything seemed possible, including the birth of the Anti-Christ”.

The fear still prevails more than ever in these times, and many would argue that SATAN can be found everywhere we look these days; television, film, books, and of course, FASHION.

But, paranoid speculation aside, perhaps one of the greatest aspects of Roman Polanski’s 1968 classic, is the devilishly divine design by Richard Sylbert. Setting the film in the both epic and ominous Dakota Building in New York City, Sylbet acts on the trends and compulsions of the time that really give definition to Rosemary’s characterization.

Prim and proper Rosemary- the picture of perfection, really. From her committed DIY efforts around the apartment, to her of-the-moment Vidal Sassoon haircut (“Don’t you like it?”), Rosemary is a portrait of a woman, perhaps society, committed to doing what’s “Right”. In the end, her constant commitment to being the “good girl” has led her down the darkest path of all.

Artwork by Aaron Duarte for The Eye of Faith

Being obsessive fans of the film’s decor, it was such a treat to stumble upon “Rosemary’s Baby: Devilish Decor” on Nowness.com! The site always features dynamic and interesting stories in the realm of art, design, film, and fashion, but the celebration of Mia Farrow’s 67th birthday with a hillarious How-To for Satanist’ provided by blogging duo Unahppy Hipsters is just what Doctor Sapperstein ordered!

Gotta give it to Richard Sylbet for being so on-point with the yellow for 1968, considering the film would have started production at least a year before! Thanks Unhappy Hipsters and Nowness for this dangerous delight!

Artwork by Aaron Duarte for The Eye of Faith.

“All the while Rosemary is remaking the apartment to suit her needs, the building (and its inhabitants) are remaking her to suit theirs, which makes her choices of bright white walls and sunny yellow fabrics seem at first hopeful, then increasingly creepy.”

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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Manic Monday: Hysteric for Charcot’s Mysterious Medical Muses

Charcot - Frighteningly Real

Charcot {29 November 1825 – 16 August 1893}

Remembered today as a leading mind in the fields of neurology and psychology, Jean-Martin Charcot‘s legacy is as much in his strange medical photography, as his famous pupils (Sigmund Freud and Georges Gilles de la Tourette), and important breakthroughs in the field.

Taken for research purposes, these bizarre medical photographs were used to document the various affects and disorders of the 19th century’s most scandalous disorder – Female Hysteria.

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EPSON MFP image

Charcot- Say Hello To My God- Science and Faith - Art and Reality- Vintage Style

For thousands of years, hysteria has plagued the medical community as a bit of a mystery. Known as “the wandering womb” by Hippocrates since the Ancient Greeks, the known method for treatment was almost always pregnancy until the 19th Century when a vaginal massage and/or stimulation using a vibrator or water hose administered by your family doctor was the modern approach.

Charcot, however, was interested in the minds of these plagued women, and hoped to use one of technology’s latest advancements, photography, to aid his research.

Charcot- vintage medical photography- wild history

Charcot - The Ladies - Magic Medical Mystery (x4)

Charcot - Many Faces and Treatments - Art and Medicine

What resulted is a macabre collection of photographs that capture terrifying and strange lost moments between doctor and patient. He took these photographs over the course of many years with hundreds of different women, as well as men (murderers and convicts) to decipher the physical codes of the world’s most confusing ancient tradition – madness.

The Eye of Faith- Charcot - Strange Behaviour

Charcot - Twisted Sister

Charcot - Vintage Style - Design Wise - Images - Man Alive

Although some of his attendants and colleagues who describe these photography sessions as highly staged, with Charcot demanding perfection of the moment that usually occurred back at the hospital, beyond the truthful eyes of the 19th Century camera. He painstakingly ensured the detail captured in each photograph was true to, what he thought, was the true depiction of the disease and its many characteristics.

Charcot- Master Mystery Tour- Vintage Medical Photography- Hysteric

 

The photographs are very specific and plain. No out of element lighting techniques or off angles – just the subject, and their explicit diagnoses. What came through is a very disturbing display.

The photographs were used to illustrate the true nature of this neurological disorder to a society fascinated by the elaborate and unusual. While many of the women were unable to be treated for their “problems”, they remain unforgettable figures of our modern life.

L0034940 Series of three photos showing a hysterical screaming woman

Today, they are as awesome and curious as ever, with hardly anything in our contemporary culture to compare these majestic and mysterious medical muses.

We really wanted to share. Don’t get hysteric!

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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{The Eye of Faith}
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A “Trip To Bountiful” or “The Night Roger Sterling Would Take Acid With Angela’s Mom From ‘My So-Called Life'”

Talk about “Far Away Places”, one of the latest episodes of AMC’s premier show “Mad Men” actually featured two of the show’s main characters hanging out with Angela’s Mom from “My So-Called Life” and embarking on an LSD vacation (to help the marriage, of course)!

We’ve seen them drink, dope, and dose before on the show, always bringing the true moods of the times has become paramount to the show . The year is 1966, and while many of us would associate acid trips and LSD with Woodstock and the hippie movement, the development of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and the exploration of its properties were anything but psychedelic at this point.

LSD, or Lysergic Acid Diethylamide, was first synthesized in 1938 by Dr. Albert Hoffman in Switzerland.  It wouldn’t be until five years later, Hoffman would unwittingly take the drug himself experiencing the first-ever “trip” . . . EVER!!!

Bicycling home, Hoffman would recall breaking down and believing he had been poisoned by the LSD – also, that his neighbor was in fact a witch! So you can imagine his distress…

The CIA would infamously use LSD as a form of mind control in a series of experiments involved in the controversial Project MKULTRA. This covert project was uncovered by a reporter in 1977 using the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) unveiling that covert units performed series of tests on American and Canadian citizens throughout the 1950s into the 1970s (maybe beyond…spooky, right?!) that included administering LSD for series of days (up to three months) and experiments in electro-shock therapy.

In fact, LSD was also being actively administered to individuals on pharmaceutical levels throughout the 1950s by various doctors around the world. The treatment of many clinical problems such as addiction, anxiety, depression, and a plethera of other psychological “disorders” were being treated with the on set side effects of the drug – the “trip”.

Once administered by a physician, whom himself has taken trips himself up to 40 times (for safety), an individual was let alone to their own vices, often times experiencing life altering epiphanies and self discoveries along the way.

Cary Grant was one such individual who swore by the miracle drug. This wasn’t something kept hidden from the public as many celebrities do presently with various addictions, but was part of a scheduled exercise between himself as a patient of psychiatry. Problems aren’t problems like they are for a man like Cary Grant who praised the techniques and results used to achieve such epic self realization.

As Grant explained in 1959 of the New York Herald Tribune:

“I have been born again. I have just been through a psychiatric experience that has completely changed me … I had to face things about myself, which I never admitted, which I didn’t know were there. Now I know that I hurt every woman I loved. I was an utter fake, a self-opinionated boor, a know-all who knew very little. Once you realize that you have all things inside you, love and hate alike, and you learn to accept them, then you can use your love to exhaust your hate … You can relax … Then you can do more than you ever dreamed you could do … That moment when your conscious meets your subconscious is a helluva wrench. You feel the whole top of your head lifting off.”

It would seem Grant had little aversion at all to talking about it, and quickly appearing in interviews and stories for The London Daily Mirror, The LA Times, and other national publications including a hilarious bit in Ladies Home Journal and Good Housekeeping headlining “How LSD Changed Cary Grant’s Private Life” to America’s housewives and bolting LSD and psychological transformation into public consciousness.

Grant wouldn’t be the only movie star to take the “trip”- other famous “patients” included James Coburn, Clare Booth Luce, Charles Brackett, and even the million dollar mermaid herself- Esther Williams who said that:

“This LSD trip … explained so much about my life’s script … [It was] such a breakthrough for me.””

Bet you never would have thought!

Hundreds of books were also written about the subject- all in hopes that LSD had the key. The magic cure to the impossible! The answer to all the meaning of one’s life necessary. Unfortunately, no sooner did the trend for LSD therapy catch on as it was quickly halted by the outlawing of LSD October 6, 1966 after nearly 40,000 patients treated by the psychedelic and literally thousands of scientific studies on the now illicit substance.


Good thing Roger and Jane caught on seemingly months before it’s demise from clinical and psychiatric care. Though still illegal, there are handfuls of individuals who would argue for LSD and its benefits. After all, every man must at some point come face to face with himself, and if life is a journey, having the ability to harness in on elements of your being is powerful. So if LSD can truly facilitate an out of body experience, and the journeyman is of sound mind, no doubt the results could be fantastic.

Recently Dyan Cannon has described her life with Cary Grant, and his obsession with LSD. Her account also includes many eyebrow-raising details of the matinee idol, we otherwise would never have guessed.Just as we always say at The Eye of Faith-  “Everything is not always as it seems”, and so is the case with the seemingly cavalier Grant.

Not surprisingly, the doctors prescribing their methods to Cary Grant were eventually apprehended for their own misuse of the psychedelic drug they had been prescribing. However, this did not stop the fascination with the psyche, and the undeniable portal LSD was giving people into their mind.

It’s powerful stuff potent enough to make someone legitimately go crazy. But, you gotta love how Roger handles his experience. You could almost imagine Roger having a Cary Grant penis rocket ship blast-offing from Earth kind of trip, but the Sterling actually pulls it off from beginning to end, and seems genuinely refreshed from his voyage of discovery.

John Slattery adds great panache and humor to the role, as he always does, and as surprising as it seems, is one of the most probable characters to be put in this situation. Poor Jane, always misunderstood and painfully misguided, if only LSD was really the answer to everything. At least they give her a great sense of style.

Totally feeling the Cleopatra inspiration on Jane’s hair, a very popular movie that was released in 1963, but received a shit load of publicity and press due to Liz’s mood swings and passionate affair with co-star Richard Burton.  There probably wasn’t a shred of paper that didn’t have a story on the now infamous production. Good to see it rubbing off, as it seems most things in magazines do- LSD included.

And if you haven’t seen the episode yet, you got to! Definitely award-worthy on all accounts! Just what everyone loves from the talented team at “Mad Men”. AMC has the clip of Roger and Jane taking acid, so click here if you dare.

Really had a lot of fun writing about this one! Never thought the day would come I could watch Roger Sterling take acid with Angela’s mom. I’d say, things are pretty sweet!

Would love to hear your take! It’s really cool how context shapes perception. The kid definitely seems happy, so what’s the deal?!

Would you take LSD with Angela Chase’s mom? Was Cary Grant totally off his rocker? What do you think? Let us know!

Sincerely,

{[THE EYE]}

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Commercial Break: Night Gallery (1970-1973)

From the creator of The  The Twilight Zone , Rod Serling, came a tv series exploring stories of horror and the macabre.  We pay homage to the nearly forgotten series that was Night Gallery.

Serling served as both on-air host of Night Gallery and was a major contributor of scripts during the series 3 season run.   But like most series that are ahead of their time, the series attracted criticism. Called out for its use of comedic blackout sketches between the longer story segments in some episodes, and for its splintered, multiple-story format, which contributed to its uneven tone.

By the final season, Serling, stung by criticism and ignored by the show’s executives, all but disowned the series.

Well, it sure was sweet while it lasted…  For those who love the series, the final and third season will be released on DVD this year, April 10th.

The Eye.

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