Tag Archives: must-see

{STYLE WISE} Wild for Kicks! ‘Beat Girl’Est Tres Chic!

Wildforkickssoundtrack

From the cusp of 1960’s culture came a film documenting wild teen tomfoolery and squaller.  Daughter of local divorced architect father, was born Jenny; an impressionably sexy young woman who falls into the towns scene of beatnik culture and electric youth.

When Jenny’s divorced father Paul marries a Parisian woman named Nichole, Jenny’s distaste for the new woman in her life is immediate.  Her now ‘mother’ is not much older than vibrant Jenny which infuriates the teased haired beauty.  In a tit for tat attempt to expose Nichole’s seedy past, Jenny begins a journey into the dark side that is deeper than she could ever have planned for.  Discovering Nichole’s root’s in the unsavoury night scene abound with strippers and rock’n roll, Jenny is determined to undermine and manipulate Nichole to get whatever the fuck she wants.  Bad girl antics ensue while attracting the attention of Kenny, owner of the dance hall.

Full of cheese-ball rebels and hot girls this flick from 1960 delivers action and vulgarity.  We surely recommend this one if you are in the mood for a badass black and white.  We know we can never get enough of greaser culture and faster kill pussycats, this flick may just get you to buy a leather jacket and bleach your hair platinum blonde… but we suggest avoiding games of ‘chicken’ despite the peer pressure.

Until next time,

{theEye}

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“STOKER” – The Life and Styles of the Rich and Sophisticated . . .

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“Stoker” is one of those films that only come out once in a blue moon; when we’ve all done our chores, and said our blessings to the universe – then we get a film like “Stoker”.

Complex, beautiful, provocative, wonderfully acted, great dialogue, and stylistically beyond are some words you could use to describe it, but its more the indescribable feelings you are left with after leaving the picture, that truly speak to its prestige in the grand scheme of world cinema.

The term world cinema couldn’t be more appropriate in this case, as Korean Director Park (Chang-Wook of “Oldboy” fame) has choreographed this exquisitely sinister plot in a language foreign to most of the cast and crew. Even while working with the film’s biggest stars, a translator was used to communicate between actor and director. And while this is his first English language film, it will definitely not be his last. As any film buff knows, the language of film is universal, and from the film’s opening shots the director’s eye for detail and acute sensibility sing a song harking back to film makers of a time long gone like Bergman, Hitchcock, and Kubrick.

India Stoker- Classic Vintage Inspired Look by Kurt and Bart

Many things spoke to us throughout the film, from Clint Mansell‘s (“Black Swan”) haunting score, the incredibly articulated and imaginative Production Design of Therese De Prez (another “Black Swan” veteran), Wentworth Miller (“Prison Break”) and Erin Wilson’s sophisticated script, as well as the acting chops of Matthew Goode ( playing against type as the mysterious Uncle with a dark past), Nicole Kidman (the lonely and vindictive mother), and most especially Mia Wasikowska, as India Stoker, the film’s protagonist.

This young starlet is always good in everything she is in, but almost expertly does she manage to tackle this role which requires her to be many things, most of the time without many words, making for a most appreciated and most memorable character in the past decade.

Surrounded by Saddle Shoes- India Stoker Style Stunner

But what stood out in particular for us here at The Eye of Faith, had to be the incredible costume design by designer duo Kurt & Bart, who put together the looks to fully realize these strange personalities.

Indeed, they are very rich and very sophisticated, and from the moment India walks onto the screen in her crocodile skinned LaBoutins, flowy skirt and floral silken blouse – you just knew you were in for a style treat with this one.

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In fact, throughout the film, the costumes play a great deal in helping enrich the story being told throughout. The designers point out a green Marni cardigan, worn during the film’s strange piano duet, noting how the colour of the cardigan matches the colours of the walls in her own house, symbolizing India’s captivity.

Also signature to the film’s main theme is a pair of shoes – saddle shoes, to be exact, which represent the more child-like and homely version of India, before she foregoes her inevitable transformation into womanhood.

India Stoker - Vintage Fashion Inspiration- Style Idol of Tomorrow

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India Stoker- The preraphaelite muse- nouveau gothic- style stunner inspiration- vintage fashion reinvention

While the film displays a nod to the 1950s with the styling of India, the duo point out that no vintage was harmed in the making of this film.

Instead, they studied day dressed and blouses from the era and used them as inspiration in the creation of India’s wardrobe, adding extra details, and unique clasps and fastenings that would indicate India’s obsessively detailed nature, as well as her rejection of the everyday – that’s my girl!

She is not of this world, but of her own, and throughout the film we are by her side in  her own elevated sense of reality.

The Spider Crawls Up Indias Saddle Shoes

I’m gonna bet there’s already been a rise in saddle shoe sales, and I’m hoping to see more girls unafraid to rock a pretty blouse and skirt combination. After all, its all in the attitude – the India Attitude.

She’s definitely a new idol of sorts; Nouveau-Gothic, in a way, with her pastel coloured blouses, and prim and proper way of dress, but grossly morose in her attitude and presentation to the world around her.

She is a representation of that breaking point from teen to adult, and that indefinite feeling of not belonging to the world that surrounds you, and doing everything you can to not fit into it. She’s a strange poster child for our generation, in that way.

There’s no doubting the staying power of this film, and in 25 years from now, we will still be looking back on this one as a great one on the level of psychological horrors like “The Shining” and “Rosemary’s Baby”. Even compared to those great classics, there is something very different here with “Stoker” that cannot be compared. Perhaps it is the contemporary nature of the story, and it taking place today that is very different.

These days American films don’t often delve into the lives of the rich and sophisticated to come out with a vision so twisted and maniacal, so perhaps it is the appropriateness of this action that really helps speak to the “nowness” of it all. There is no denying the conspiracies and secrets of the world’s most affluent families, and as history as shown us, they often hide the most terrible and terrifying secrets . . .

Finding The Letters She Never Received

“Stoker” is a glimpse on what might just be the truth behind the family with the mansion, the housekeeper, the beautifully kept lawn, the designer furniture, valuable antiques, most incredible designer clothing, and carved stone art just laying about in the garden. After all, you never know . . .

From the very beginning it will really keep you guessing, but be warned – its not for the faint of heart. This is a thriller, and while director Park describes his film as a modern fairy tale, don’t be expecting ponies and rainbows from this one. There is a glass slipper at the end of it all – though be them black crocodile LaBoutins at the end of it all, which maybe a few hours afterwards will really strike you as a funny “Happy Ever After” to this very modern Fairy Tale; a fairy tale that, unlike most,  challenges its audiences, and asks you to question the characters motives and uncover their vices to help us question ourselves and our own everyday anxieties.

So if there’s one thing you get up to this week its getting your butt out the door to see this film!

Stoker- Opening Shots

This is me. Just as a flower does not choose its colour, we are not responsible for what we come to be. Only once you realize this do you become free. And to become adult, is to become free.

-India, “Stoker” {2013}.

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Dying for the look? Stay Tuned to The Eye of Faith for the tools to recreate Stoker’s sensual 1950s reinvention!

Shotguns and Saddle Shoes - Stoker Style

Until we meet again!

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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MUSIC MINUTE: “Waltz” by Toru Takemitsu from “The Face of Another”

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This piece is the opening song to Hiroshi Teshigahara’s 1966 film  “The Face of Another”, an equally disturbing and visually dynamic style stunner to his more famous film “The Woman in the Dunes”, which were also written by the novelist Kobo Abe, who wrote the books from which both films are based off of.

We love the saunter to this piece, and the brilliant mystery it encapsulates….

Please enjoy!

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The Face of Another

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Sincerely,

{theEye}

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Aronofsky’s “NOAH” Trailer Drops!

Finally, a taste!

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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{SHARE THIS} The Telekinetic Coffee Shop Surprise!

Telekinetic Coffee Shop Inspired by Carrie

This made us laugh . . .HARD.

Although nothing about telekinetic attacks is funny in any sense (someone could get hurt), we couldn’t help but laugh at the pure horror these pranksters conjured to spook the living daylights out of innocent coffee-goers in honor of the upcoming redesign of the Stephen King classic “Carrie“, starring Chloe Moretz and Julianne Moore (out October 18).

It’s also rather apropos to be writing this post inside a coffee shop. Too bad it’s not turning out anywhere near as exciting as this.

Why do people stand there? I’d be out of there in a flash the second a man is being dragged up a wall. That’s the sign things are getting real messy. I guess also be careful who you spill your coffee on . . .

We also hope this inspires many more innovative and interactive movie promotions in the near {Future}!

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FAME, LOVE, and EXCESS: Behind the Scenes of Steven Soderbergh’s “Behind the Candelabra”

Scott Thorson and Liberace - Vintage Black and White photograph

Check out this exclusive behind-the-scenes look at “Behind the Candelabra”, HBO’s newest film by Academy Award winning director, Steven Soderbergh. The film is a decadent look back at the life of famed musician Liberace and his “tempestuous” six year relationship with his young lover and limousine driver, Scott Thorson.

The film is crashing the Cannes film festival, and is being eaten up alive by critics for its passionate performances by Michael Douglas (as Liberace, himself) and Matt Damon (as the apple of his eye), and the sumptuous reincarnation of Liberace’s over-the-top lifestyle.

michael douglas as liberace himself- behind the candelabra- vintage inspiration

matt damon as scott thorson in behind the candelabra - vintage inspiration

behind the candelabra - matt damon and michael douglas - liberace and scott thorson - vintage inspiration

We can’t wait to check this film out as soon as we get the chance, but until then, we were happy to come across this in-depth video of all the trials and tribulations of making the film itself. So check it out below:

 

Scott Thorson and Liberace

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Bringing the Past Back to Life! Behind the Scenes THE GREAT GATSBY & BROOKS BROTHERS

Lets Party! (Gatsby Style)

Brooks Brothers is offering an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at the upcoming film remake of the classic 1920’s novel “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

While the 1974 version is iconic in its own right, but Baz Luhrmann’s revamped hyper saturated glittered tour-de-force looks to reimagine the classic tale of lost love and the unrelenting politics of class – it’s a story that manages to continually mirror our own society into 2013.

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In fact, the remake has been a long time coming, and its great to see such attention to detail brought by legendary and award-winning production and costume designer Catherine Martin, who seems to have pulled out all the stops to bring a fresh and accurate portrayal of 1920s Gatsby glamour.

For the film, Martin was lucky enough to get a chance to muse through the historical archives at Brooks Brothers (F. Scott Fitzgerald’s  personal favourite place to shop for clothes) to achieve the greatest amount of period accuracy and detail. The result is a much-needed revival of classic American style.

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From the dandy that is Gatsby, to the more humble narrator Nick; each character is rich with their own personality, and is bound to inspire countless cults of must-havers!

The most intriguing detail, by far, has to be the skull and bone lining added to the blazers of Tom Buchanan (played by Joel Edgerton) for the film to play off of the character’s privileged Yale roots. . . . Secret society details for days, my dear! Secret society details for days . . .

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I waited, and sure enough, in a moment she looked at me with an absolute smirk on her lovely face as if she had asserted her membership in a rather distinguished secret society to which she and Tom belonged.

– Quote, ” The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Back in 1974, fashion definitely had a 1920s revival of sorts, and there’s no doubt in my mind that this film is going to take the fashion world by storm again. After all, the vintage-style has been growing stronger and stronger for years now, heading more towards that dandy style that Gatsby epitomizes, and in the world of womenswear, Deco-styles, metallics, sequins, fur, and all-out luxury have been for years on the map. They had it in the cards all along it seems.

Brooks Brothers has prepared an exclusive Behind-the-Scenes look with Catherine Martin who talks of their unique involvement with the film, as well as a bit about the characters she created, so please check it out below!

Enjoy this sumptuous feast for the eyes, and come back soon for more Gatsby indulgences!

The film is set to release May 10, so mark your calendars!

2013 has been a great year for vintage styles, so lets keep ’em coming, Universe . . .

Until next time,

{theEye}

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FREAKY FRIDAY: Vintage Ancient Aliens! William Shatner’s “Mysteries of the Gods” (1977)

William Shatner- Captain James Kirk

William Shatner is best known as Captain Kirk in the iconic 1960s sci-fi series (the original, tamer, Battlestar Gallactica), marking his first foray into the world of outer space, extra terrestrials, space ships, and other worldly beings. But in 1977, Shatner released a documentary that would have the Canadian star again looking to the stars, this time for answers.

William Shatner - Vintage- In the Pool

William Shatner - Vintage Outdoor Beefcake Photograph

Based on Erich Von Daniken’s best selling series (his feature film documentary “Chariot of the Gods” was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary in 1970), “Mysteries of the Gods” continued on the popular quest to discover from whence we came. It’s the original “Ancient Aliens“.

Did millions of years ago, visitors from other planets come to Earth and help accelerate our primitive ancestor’s genes to propel civilization as we know it today? Scientists often note how remarkable it is that human civilization went from cave dwelling hunter-gathers to suddenly building slick and sophisticated cultures with engineering that defies the capabilities of today’s most advanced technologies.

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It definitely is disturbing to think that we live in a world where we still have not figured out how they moved the stones of the Pyramids?! How far behind are we? Or did ancient people have help from our astronaut ancestors, or worse, giants that literally roamed the Earth?

If not, why do so many “primitive” cultures, even today, still tell legends of giant men who made us “normal” humans seem like crickets? Now I’m starting to sound a bit like Shatner, so instead I’ll simply live you with the video itself.

Mysteries of the Gods- William Shatner- 1977 Vintage Movie Poster

The documentary in its entirety has been uploaded to the web (thank you 21st Century), so you can ponder these questions, in all the 1970s New Age Psychedelia of William Shatner’s “Mysteries of the Gods“.

Don’t miss out on his brown suede shirt – boho chic.

Have a good weekend!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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God is in the Details: Revealing the Early Renaissance @AGOToronto

Revealing the Renaissance at the AGO - secrets in florentine art - the Peruzzi Altar Piece

Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art (March 16 – June 16, 2013)

ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO (317 Dundas Street West)

$25 adult admission (includes admission to the rest of the gallery)

When thinking of the Renaissance, one might automatically conjure up images of Da Vinci, his Vetruvian man, and Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel. It is a period in history renowned for its surge of creativity, knowledge, and innovation in areas of art, literature, music, architecture, and science.

It is a period that is also become more and more in vogue due to its resurgence in popular culture with T.V. shows like “The Tudors”, “The Borgias”, and the upcoming “Da Vinci’s Demons”, all putting their spin to this exciting and important moment in history.

But, what is rarely captured is the true birth of this period, and the movers and shakers who brought it all to life.

Perhaps its the fact that most art historians do not even know the names of most of the incredible artisans who painstakingly brought the churches of Florence to life with incredibly illuminated manuscripts, carvings, stained glass windows, and beautifully detailed panel paintings, between the years 1300 and 1350, that truly did start it all.

Revealing the renaissance: stories and secrets in florentine art

This is what Sasha Suda and the curators of the Art Gallery of Ontario‘s latest exhibition, “Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art“, aim to bring to the forefront, allowing visitors to explore the lost masterworks that truly sparked a revolution, and would change the face of history forever.

In partnership with the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the curators have painstakingly worked on this exhibition for the past 10 years, travelling far and wide to analyze and bring overseas for the first time some of the most elaborate examples of work from this period that define the breaking point from the flatness of Medieval art to a more expressive and “humanized” perspective that has come to characterize the Renaissance.

Many of these pieces have been shut away from the public for centuries, making this one of the most impressive exhibits the AGO has ever premiered, and one that is sure to capture the imagination of all those lucky enough to visit.

The main gallery at Revealing the early renaissance- stories and secrets in florentine art - AGO- March 12, 2013

Sasha Suda Talks Art With Culture Minister Michael Chan

Curator Sasha Suda talks art with Michael Chan, Ontario Minister of Culture, Tourism, & Sport.  

One might, at first, be intimidated by the prestige of such an exhibit, but fear not, as this portal on the past is as much a reflection of our present day, as it is the 14th Century.

Whether or not you know a great deal about Renaissance art, the exhibition is packed full of information, from the audio guide, to the i-pads strategically placed amongst the exhibition to give you the full backstory on some of the exhibition’s most intriguing pieces. The curators have created an easy to understand story, that truly captures all the excitement and mystery of the artists and the works they created amidst the social context of Florence during this period.

Detail of the Peruzzi Altarpiece - christ wounds- revealing the early renaissance: stories and secrets in florentine art at the AGORevealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO -

God is in the Details . . .

As you first step into the gallery, it may not immediately strike you how these works differ from the Medieval illustrations and paintings you are used to, but upon closer examination, you will find how rich, textured, and full of emotion each piece truly is.

They are not works of art to be admired from afar, but works that deserve an acute eye, and a willingness to get lost in the stories being told within them.

There is a certain excitement generated as you begin to see the layers of colour, and painstakingly small brush strokes that capture the most miniscule details of hair and embroidery. While our culture might be used to multiple images rapidly flashing before our eyes (surely a luxury akin to witchcraft for the men and women of the Renaissance), one must note that the multi-faceted panels and illuminated manuscripts are akin to the cinema of the Renaissance, with all the drama, suspense, horror, and spectacle you could expect from a film of today, with even a bit of special effects here and there.

Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO

An exquisite panel painting. Blood, gore, and devotion. The piece reads almost like an expensive 14th Century comic . . .

It”s all for devotion sake, of course; used to invoke prayer, meditation, deep-thought, or contemplation. There’s definitely that sense of entertainment in the midst, often showcasing the more brutal and tumultuous moments of martyrs and Christ: Agatha with her breasts being cut off, another martyr is grilled on coals in ecstasy, and check out any crucified Christ in the mix and you’re bound to see more than your year’s worth of blood squirt (the most impressive, hands down, being Pacino Di Bonaguido’s “The Crucifixion” from 1315-1320, whose flowing blood rains on the spectators of the scene, as well as a juicy squirt from the chest for the viewer).

The Crucifixion by Pacino Bonaguida at the AGO - March 12, 2013 - Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and secrets in florentine art Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO - Detail of Bonaguida's "THE CRUCIFIXION"

Pacino De Bonaguida’s “The Crucifixion” and Detail of (1315-1320)

And while, we might cringe at the sight of this, its patrons felt the bloodshed and pain was the human aspect of their faith, and that one day perhaps, they may themselves reach divination, as did their faithful predecessors.

Getting lost in each piece, you begin to see that this society was obsessed with their idols, and their chance to be a part of them was as easy as getting a master to paint them into a panel or manuscript. In essence, it equated a wealthy merchant to the status of celebrity, having made his way onto the pages alongside the kingdom of heaven complete with Christ, the Virgin, and all the many martyrs who gave their life to the dedication of their fate.

The most entertaining example of this is the Laudario of Sant’Agnesse; an illuminated choir book commissioned by the Compagnia di Sant’Agnese, a fraternity of merchants, for use in charitable events and prayer, and who are also illustrated along the margins of the music. This remarkable collection of 24 illustrated manuscripts have been framed and reunited for the first time since the early 1800s, and will be performed by musical guests Lionheart on April 6 in the Walker Court of the AGO (click for more details).

Detail of Daddi's "Crowned Virgin Martyr" - Revealin ghte Early Renaissance at the AGO - Toronto

Detail of “A Crowned Virgin Martyr {Catherine of Alexandria}” (1334 – 1338) by Bernardo Daddi. 

It is amazing to think that at one time, masters like Botticelli, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Michelangelo must have set their gaze on these exact works to hone their own craft, and garner inspiration to create the masterpieces of the Renaissance we marvel at today. For when staring at the suggestive expression of Bernardo Daddi’s “A Crowned Virgin Martyr” (1334-1338), a glimpse of Da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa”  with her mysterious stare, and face full of subtle shadows that delicately sculpt her face, can definitely be seen,  which make the exhibition all the more exciting, and relevant.

In many ways, the exhibition brings to light that not much has changed in the world of art and commerce; citing the importance of banking and the prosperous merchant class to the creation of these vital works of art. Being so wealthy, members of the merchant class became so concerned that they may not  reach heaven, that they began spending their fortunes on commissioning buildings, and filling them with new art that expressed their hopes, fears, ideals, and emotions.

Revealing the Early Renaissance at the AGO-A view of Bernardo Daddi Italian The Martyrdom of Saint Ursula and 11,000 Virgins

With prosperity, comes art – and not much has changed today, as many of the world’s most successful artists rely on wealthy investors and corporate big wigs to the cut the cheque on a commission. Perhaps they no longer fear purgatory for their sins, but they are most definitely keeping their fingers crossed that their commission could strike them big dollars, and in that way, achieve idol status, and a bit of heaven.

The exhibition has already been lauded by the Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times as one of the most important exhibitions in recent years, so don’t miss out on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to travel through time, and take in 90 once-hidden masterworks that came to redefine life as we know it today.

Agony and the Ecstacy - Blood and Gore - Revealing the Early Renaissance at the AGO

All the Agony & The Ecstacy . . .

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Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art” opens at the AGO on March 16 and runs until June 16, 2013. To book your tickets today, click here!

Also be sure to check out the event schedule at the AGO for exciting insights inspired by this latest exhibit (Click here).

Sasha Suda, Michael Chan (Ontario Minister of Culture), and CEO at the AGO, Matthew Teitelbaum - March 12, 2013 - AGO Press Preview

Matthew Teitelbaum (CEO at the AGO), Sasha Suda (Assistant Curator of European art at the AGO), and Michael Chan (Ontario Minister of Culture, Tourism, & Sport) – March 12, 2013. 

Until next time,

{theEye}

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