Tag Archives: interesting

+ FAVOURITE FIND + VIVA MAGAZINE {circa. January 1976}

VIVA MAGAINE: The International Woman’s Magazine {circa. January 1977}

Cover Photograph by the iconic HELMUT NEWTON (hence, the undoubtable chic-ness of this image).  Published by icons Bob Guccione and Kathy Keeton of PENTHOUSE fame, this is a prime piece of classic porn chic.

First coined in a highly influential New York Times article in 1973, porno chic describes a distinct period between 1969 and 1984 where American pornos were hitting the mainstream consciousness and pocketbooks hardcore. Andy Warhol kicked it off in 69 with Blue Movie, and films like Deep Throat, Behind the Green Door, Caligula, The Opening of Misty Beehtoven, A Night at the Adonis, and Flesh Gordon are among the films that encapsulate the Golden Age of Porn.

But it wasn’t just about the films. This period also saw a surge of amazing publishing prowess seen by magazines like PLAYBOY, HUSTLER, OUI, and of course PENTHOUSE dominated the scene, but for the first time publishers turned their attention to the female gaze, and offered pleasures like PLAYGIRL and VIVA with the male form objectified freely and openly to ease the tensions of the day.

I know it seems cliche to say, but its about the articles, too! Especially adult magazines of this period, you will find some powerful political, cultural, and historical content that just can’t be beat! Some of the articles included in this VIVA Magazine include:

The Blue Angel: Inside New York’s Naughtiest Night Club
Minnie Riperton Raps About Fashion
The Real Brenda Vaccaro
The Naked Cowboy
Dustin Hoffman & Robert Redford on set of “All the President’s Men”
Do You Have What It Takes to Be Happy?

Not going to lie; what really stood out to us was the top story on the cover: HOW TO MAKE LOVE LIKE A WITCH!

 

The things they targeted their demographics with back in these times is fantastic! Imagine if they had published topics like this today?? People would have a fit! But, seriously we need more of this!

That’s just what makes this piece so god damn amusing. Keep pieces like this for entertaining treats for your guests- some pop culture, history, and a little eye candy.

They don’t make them like they used to …

And I always get a kick with cigarette ads from this period. They are always so special and great. Like this one:

Just out in the park picking flowers and placing them in my pretty flower basket and smoking a cigarette. . .  

+LADY BE COOL+

I don’t know how things have taken such a drastic turn. It’s rather sad, really…but luckily, we do have pieces like this to remind us of these lost times.

This is a rare item especially considering the super sensual and chic Helmut Newton cover, and VIVA being of lesser popularity as PLAYBOY or even PLAYGIRL. If you have any questions? Send us a message to the.eye.of.faith@gmail.com

Check out more details in listing in the {SHOP}

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{MUSIC MINUTE} Orkestra Obselete’s “Blue Monday 1933”

Screen shot 2016-03-10 at 12.34.12 PM

Its official. It has been 33 years since the release of New Order’s iconic New Wave classic “Blue Monday”, and just the other day this incredible rendition by Orkestra Obselete brought the 80s jam to life using obsolete instruments from the 1930s!

On top of their wildly original version, we are obsessed with their dark and mysterious presentation which includes black masks, and dim lighting for the perfect secret society vibe!

You know that we are big believers in the {PAST} {PRESENT} and {FUTURE} colliding, and here we have the perfect example of how this magical mixture can really amp up our everyday, and make us see things a little differently!

You can mesh your life with the {PAST} and help shape the {FUTURE} by shopping the {SHOP}! Tons of ingredients to help conjure your unique style spirit, and don’t forget XIXIXI gets you 25% OFF.  Click here to shop now! 

For now enjoy these tunes!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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Music Minute: “Penumbra” by Bobby Beausoleil and the Freedom Orchestra

Bobby Beausoleil- Friends with Satan

Bobby Beausoleil- Vintage- Tattooed King

Bobby Beausoleil has a bit of a bad rep. Bad rep could be an understatement, but it’s true.

It never helps to be friends with Charles Manson, or get caught up in a war against society,  but its sad to have this overshadow some of his greater achievements, like music. It goes without saying that he was a rebel to the extreme; a hardcore bad boy, his music translates a certain genius that was erased by his life’s tragedies.

Bobby Beausoleil - Do What Thou Wylt

This is a track that was recorded for the Kenneth Anger film “Lucifer Rising” (Anger is also an E.O.F. Style Idol).

Entitled “Penumbra”, and composed by Beausoleil himself, the track was not used for the film, but can be heard today along with the Freedom Orchestra to create a magical and mystic ride to other places. It’s definitely something to jam to, and knowing how the darkness delights you, I’m sure you will find this one truly intrinsic.

Bobby Beausoleil appeared also appeared in Kenneth Anger’s magic short, “Invocation of My Demon Brother”, alongside Anger himself, and the notorious Anton LaVey – the founder and High Priest of the First Church of Satan, and a staple haunt of the entertainment industry in California during this time.

Invocations of My Demon Brother- Body

Bobby Beausoleil - My Demon Brother- Vintage Memories

Bobby Beausoleil, insane in the membrane in “Invocation of My Demon Brother” (1969)

The Eyes of Bobby Beausoleil

So, what do you think of the tune? HAUNTING? ?  ?

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I don’t mean to scare you . . .

So,

+until next time+

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{theEye}
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kenneth-anger-the light prince of darkness

The Eye of Faith Gets “Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller”

 

portrait_cardiff_miller_2012

[Photo: Zev Tiefenbach]

The world of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and Geroge Bures Miller exist somewhere between reality and the vortex of our imaginations. . . 

The artist duo are known for their of-this-world out-of-this-world creations that combine objects, sound, images, mechanics, lighting, construction, and cinema to create one-of-kind experiments and showcases in the transcendental quality and nature of art.

As one of the world’s most internationally respected artist partnerships, we were lucky to get a chance to enjoy a retrospective of their work, in an exhibit appropriately title “Lost in the Memory Palace”, which runs from April 6 until August 18, 2013 at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

From the beginning of their partnership in 1995 to their work today, the artist duo have expertly managed to create evocative and multi-textural and dimensional works that transport its viewers to other worlds and often exotic states of mind.

portrait-janet cardiff and george miller_Bodtlaender

The duo has cited cinema as a major driving force in their work, bringing the immersive technology of the cinema to life in a gallery setting,  allowing the viewers an accessibility and availability that is mostly foreign to other works in the art gallery setting. While we are often encouraged to keep a distance in the world of art, Cardiff-Miller’s pieces are encouragingly tactile and require a closer look.

This is not a show that you can skim through and really “get” immediately. Going into it with this frame of mind would be disaster.

Like a film, the pieces require a dose of commitment, and an ability to get lost in the world being offered to you by the artists. The worlds are often slightly disturbing as you notice odd-looking effigies, or are startled by an abrupt sound; the element of mystery is definitely in the air, forcing you to question your own reality.

Such is the case with “Dark Pool”, the couple’s first installation created in 1995.

Cardiff Miller- Dark Pool

darkpool_4

I like that the technology is so popular it is almost invisible so that people can become intimate with it. At the same time the recorded voice is removed and has a sense of past that a real voice doesn’t, so it can actually get closer to the audience through that removal. They feel safe being intimate with a removed voice.

-Janet Cardiff

You are invited to open a paint chipped antiquated door to enter a long, dark, small room filled to the brim with boxes, books, furniture, rolling racks, and antique objects. You might want to, at first, turn back in fear of what could be lurking in the shadows, but very quickly you find yourself exhilarated by curiosity. As you walk through the room, you hear voices and whispers from the past (children, an elderly woman, a young couple), and begin to notice the clues all around you:

darkpool_3

darkpool_5e

darkpool_5c

[Photos: Cardiff/Miller]

An opened book on reading tea leaves sits behind a tray full of dirty empty tea cups. Two viewfinders, side by side, show a man and woman in a passionate embrace, the other shows a couple with signs of stagnant disdain. You see a collection of porcelain hands. A half-eaten biscuit on a plate. You hear the sound of Judy Garland launch from the radio singing her tragic anthem, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”. You notice a book that dictates the signs of mental instability.

Often times, as in the case of “Storm Room” (2009), the imagined world is created so thoroughly, you really do question whether the artists have perhaps maneuvered a time slip or some sort of trans-continental teleportation device to get you to the empty Dentist’s office near Tokamachi, Japan, that was recreated for the piece.

Storm Room 1

[Photo: N.M. Hutcgubson]

An elaborate system of pipes, lighting, and speakers provide an uber realistic rendition of finding yourself unsure, even whilst in the comfort of “safety”. You can hear the coughing of a neighbour in the next “room”, and while you wait for the storm to “end”, you find yourself wondering where exactly you might have landed.

Storm Room 2

[Photo: N.M. Hutcgubson]

As water streams down the windows, and the rolling sound of thunder rattles the floor, you notice a roll of Japanese dental floss, buckets filling with water, a telephone, some old Japanese calendars, and a floor fan that only helps instil the uncomfortable quality of a 1960s Hiroshi Teshigahara film.

The Killing Machine- Cardiff Miller

[Photo: Seber Ugarte & Lorena Lopez]

Another unsettling piece, 2007’s  “The Killing Machine”, transports to a world unexpected and unknown. Forcing the viewer to imagine the violence and pain of being held on its soft pink fur chair at the will of two  elegantly choreographed, rotating stabbing wands, the piece is equally unsettling as it is beautiful.

Cardiff Miller- the killing machine - 2007

[Photo: Seber Ugarte & Lorena Lopez]

A statement on the nature of capital punishment, as well as a riff off Franz Kafka’s “In the Penal Colony”, the piece works on the level that it blends these horrors with a beautiful array of coloured lights, a disco ball (who doesn’t love a disco ball?), and almost triumphant orchestration for a bizarrely amusing and eerie imagining of our society’s indifference to killing.

The most impacting piece, had to be the first piece ventured to in the gallery – “Opera for a Small Room” which the couple created in 2005. The piece is a 20 minute long immersion into the tale of a sad and mysterious man (“R DENNEHY”) who speaks throughout the piece about his sad tale of lost love, and a seemingly lost sense of self.

Cardiff Miller - Opera for a Small Room

[Photo: Cardiff/Miller]

Contained in a small shed-like space filled to the brim with nearly 2,000 individual records, eight record players, and twenty-four antique loudspeakers; the piece encapsulate a mysterious, melancholy, and mildly sinister mood, all while telling the story of the strange man who embodies the space between the sounds of various arias, sounds, songs, and pop music. The entire story is aligned with the change of synchronized light and colour.

cardiff miller- opera for a small room- detail

cardiff miller- opera for a small room- detail 2

[Photo: Cardiff/Miller]

As the piece progresses you are enticed to circle the “room” to peer through the wall’s various cut-outs and doorways in hopes of gaining new perspectives on the world inside. As your eyes begin to wander you notice bowling trophies, suitcases, and other objects that add to this strange simulated reality. Its an opus of emotion, and another testament to the artists’ unique craft.

opera for a small room- cardiff miller- room

[Photo: Kunsthaus Bregenz]

   Writing is like a 3-Dimensional process for me. The words and sentences have to work with a physical space, resonate with that space. One thing works on the page but it’s a different thing when they are juxtaposed with a physical environment.

Janet Cardiff

Like a movie in real time playing before your eyes, the works of Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller are remarkable and exciting works of contemporary Canadian art that we are lucky enough to have gotten the chance to enjoy so closely and thoroughly.

The artists’ cinematic tendencies and unusual combination of various sound and media point to a world where the disparate worlds of various arts and industry can coincide and exist together, for engaging and elevating works of art that not only provide an aesthetic experience, but delve deep into the psyche to penetrate the world of dream, nightmare, and emotion.

To put it plainly, “Lost in the Memory Palace” is as close to Utopia as we’ve seen in this world yet. There are plenty of other pieces by the couple to enjoy at the exhibit, so be sure not to miss out on this incredibly poignant and realized showing on now at the AGO.

“Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller” at the Art Gallery of Ontario {April 6, 2013 – August 18, 2013}, for more info click here.

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {February 22, 2013}

Paul Newman- Vintage Mens Fashion Style- 1959 - the eye of faith vintage- Hollywood Idol

{  Vintage Style Idol – Paul Newman, 1959 }

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+Studying the Classics+

Don’t you think this picture could’ve been taken just yesterday?

That’s the power of true style- you can live forever, a true time traveller.

Don’t get caught up worshipping the trends. Idols from the past can help you.

Use our style ancestors to help pave the way to your true destiny.

It doesn’t have to be hard. In fact, whatever you do, keep it simple, and let your soul shine through.

{For more inspiration check out our E.O.F. Style Idols & Divinities}

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Make sure to check out all of our other vintage memories and musings.

And don’t forget to get lost in the process. . . 

FOLLOW US @theeyeoffaith on TWITTER

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Thanks for visiting!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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eof style idol- francoise hardy 2

Tour the Junction: Masonic Mondays

[Photo Source: James Ellis: Architect of the Junction]

Nearly two years ago, when we relocated to Toronto’s historic Junction neighborhood, we were drawn to the area’s rich culture and history.

Most famously, the Junction is known to have jump started Prohibition laws, declaring a community-wide ban on alcohol in 1904 that lasted voluntarily up into the year 2000!

Not that the people of the Junction don’t enjoy a good time. In fact, the neighborhood is more alive than ever housing dozens of thriving businesses that include Galleries, Antiques, Organic & Raw Foods, Books, Gyms, and Clothing.

In an article by the New York Times, the Junction was even compared to Aboott Kinney Boulevard in Venice, California, for it’s cool digs and industrial vibe, naming it “Skid Row Hip”. Not bad, Junction! Way to go!

One of the coolest places you can make your way to would definitely have to be the Toronto West Masonic Temple on the corner of Annette & Pacific, just beside the beautiful Annette Street Toronto Public Library. The two buildings were built by architect James August Ellis (1856-1935).

The construction of the building began in 1909, and remains one of the finest and most impressive Masonic Temples in the country, and many of the Temple’s earliest members became movers and shakers in the community.

The Temple’s design is based on actual descriptions of King Solomon’s Temple in Jerusalem, and the shape, and configuration of rooms have been arranged to correspond with the actual layout and decoration of the ancient temple.

The Temple was built without any windows, as so Non-Masons cannot illicitly learn any of the Masonic activities that take place within it’s walls. The Temple is active and currently still in use by members of the Prince of Wales Lodge 630 and Victoria Lodge 474.

The Temple is striking in it’s simplicity, especially beside the Beaux-Arts grandeur of the Annette Street Library next door. I can’t help but wonder how the two buildings function so close together. The library, a source of knowledge, the Temple, also a source of knowledge…sacred secret knowledge.

The two buildings were designed by the same architect, and perhaps hold more secrets than knowledge. But as with most things Masonic, everything is in plain view. The Temple’s doors depict the Square and Compass, the Sun, and the Royal Arch (another Masonic organization).

Above is a stained glass pentagram, an ancient symbol that defines man.

It may seem sinister, but in fact, a five pointed star alludes simply to humanity. Five fingers, five toes, five senses, five stages of life (birth, adolescence, coitus, parenthood and death). Five wounds of Christ on the cross. Five Pillars of the Muslim faith, alongside five daily prayers. Even the Wiccan kiss is fivefold- feet, knees, womb, breasts, and lips.

“Audi, Vidi, Tace” / “I see, I hear, and I am Silent”

[Slogan for the United Grand Lodge of Canada]

[Photo Source: PICCSY]

Drawing a pentagram you may also notice it only takes a single line. Where you start the pentagram, you also finish it.

This symbolizes the journey of man from birth to God. This is the plight of every Mason, to attain a destiny higher than that of this Earth. The rites and rituals held within these brick walls would help the initiates achieve this destiny.

Five is also symbolic of Mars, God of War to the Greeks, and Horus to the Egyptians. It signifies severity, conflict and harmony through conflict….(interesting)

The primary belief of the Masonic brotherhood is that of the Supreme Being. This extends beyond the context of any organized religion, and focuses on the primary life force at work with us on the day to day, as well as the  origins of Man, and our inherent destiny.

Since the Middle Ages, Masons have been the source of speculation and controversy, and were persecuted by the Church in the same manner as those accused of sorcery. Since the Masonic tradition is centered around the Supreme Being, religious fundamentalists often point to this as a conflict of interest to the one and only true God. What the F is with that?

Hundreds of books have been written on the subject, which seems to be growing more and more in the popular media, so it’s definitely good to dig and do some real reading on the subject as not to get carried away by myths, folklore, and the lengths Hollywood will go to exploit and entertain.

As for the West Toronto Masonic Temple, it remains as enigmatic as it appears in my pictures. Strong and noble, it’s simplicity speaks. There are no secrets to it, really. The words MASONIC TEMPLE are boldly engraved on the front of the building, and ask any Mason about their secret society – the first thing you might learn is that it’s not secret, whatsoever.

In fact, all you have to do is ask, and you can join (as long as you are 21, believe in a Supreme Being, are Male, and have reference from two members). Invitations are strictly forbidden, so expressing your interest is the key. Also, don’t expect immediate riches or status, as every man ultimately creates his own destiny.  The primary goals of each Lodge are charity and the community.

Click here to learn more.

<<TORONTO WEST MASONS OFFICIAL SITE>>

Directly across the way from the West Toronto Masonic Temple is an interesting addition to the community.

The Victoria Lofts are one of the stand-out new developments in the neighborhood, and it’s presence cannot be missed. Standing straight across from the Library & Masonic Temple, the new condos have made their home in what used to be the Victorian Presbyterian Church.

It’s an impressive complex, and it’s near impossible not to say ” I wish I lived there”, especially checking out the church’s impressive steeple.

There are definitely many churches on this strip at Annette, and it’s very interesting to see one of the largest and oldest being converted into luxury lofts for young professionals in the area.

[Source: Google Maps]

Seeing as the Church operated for over 120 years, it’s hard to imagine living amongst the walls built on what was once sacred hallowed ground. I guess it still is, really. And the close proximity of the Masonic Temple to the Presbyterian Church, is also something interesting to query.

This, among other things, make walking down Annette a true joy, and completely helped us fulfill our Masonic Monday! So, definitely if you’re in the area, you’re best to check out the corner of Pacific and Annette for a little history, as well as conjure a bit of mystery….

Make sure to check out our E.O.F.  MASTER {MASON} Style!

[All photos, unless noted, were taken by and are property of The Eye of Faith.com]

Sincerely,

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+ {theEye} +

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {June 26, 2012}

“Watch OUT!”

[Early Photo Wizardry]

Unknown Artist {Circa. 1940s}

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A “Trip To Bountiful” or “The Night Roger Sterling Would Take Acid With Angela’s Mom From ‘My So-Called Life'”

Talk about “Far Away Places”, one of the latest episodes of AMC’s premier show “Mad Men” actually featured two of the show’s main characters hanging out with Angela’s Mom from “My So-Called Life” and embarking on an LSD vacation (to help the marriage, of course)!

We’ve seen them drink, dope, and dose before on the show, always bringing the true moods of the times has become paramount to the show . The year is 1966, and while many of us would associate acid trips and LSD with Woodstock and the hippie movement, the development of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and the exploration of its properties were anything but psychedelic at this point.

LSD, or Lysergic Acid Diethylamide, was first synthesized in 1938 by Dr. Albert Hoffman in Switzerland.  It wouldn’t be until five years later, Hoffman would unwittingly take the drug himself experiencing the first-ever “trip” . . . EVER!!!

Bicycling home, Hoffman would recall breaking down and believing he had been poisoned by the LSD – also, that his neighbor was in fact a witch! So you can imagine his distress…

The CIA would infamously use LSD as a form of mind control in a series of experiments involved in the controversial Project MKULTRA. This covert project was uncovered by a reporter in 1977 using the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) unveiling that covert units performed series of tests on American and Canadian citizens throughout the 1950s into the 1970s (maybe beyond…spooky, right?!) that included administering LSD for series of days (up to three months) and experiments in electro-shock therapy.

In fact, LSD was also being actively administered to individuals on pharmaceutical levels throughout the 1950s by various doctors around the world. The treatment of many clinical problems such as addiction, anxiety, depression, and a plethera of other psychological “disorders” were being treated with the on set side effects of the drug – the “trip”.

Once administered by a physician, whom himself has taken trips himself up to 40 times (for safety), an individual was let alone to their own vices, often times experiencing life altering epiphanies and self discoveries along the way.

Cary Grant was one such individual who swore by the miracle drug. This wasn’t something kept hidden from the public as many celebrities do presently with various addictions, but was part of a scheduled exercise between himself as a patient of psychiatry. Problems aren’t problems like they are for a man like Cary Grant who praised the techniques and results used to achieve such epic self realization.

As Grant explained in 1959 of the New York Herald Tribune:

“I have been born again. I have just been through a psychiatric experience that has completely changed me … I had to face things about myself, which I never admitted, which I didn’t know were there. Now I know that I hurt every woman I loved. I was an utter fake, a self-opinionated boor, a know-all who knew very little. Once you realize that you have all things inside you, love and hate alike, and you learn to accept them, then you can use your love to exhaust your hate … You can relax … Then you can do more than you ever dreamed you could do … That moment when your conscious meets your subconscious is a helluva wrench. You feel the whole top of your head lifting off.”

It would seem Grant had little aversion at all to talking about it, and quickly appearing in interviews and stories for The London Daily Mirror, The LA Times, and other national publications including a hilarious bit in Ladies Home Journal and Good Housekeeping headlining “How LSD Changed Cary Grant’s Private Life” to America’s housewives and bolting LSD and psychological transformation into public consciousness.

Grant wouldn’t be the only movie star to take the “trip”- other famous “patients” included James Coburn, Clare Booth Luce, Charles Brackett, and even the million dollar mermaid herself- Esther Williams who said that:

“This LSD trip … explained so much about my life’s script … [It was] such a breakthrough for me.””

Bet you never would have thought!

Hundreds of books were also written about the subject- all in hopes that LSD had the key. The magic cure to the impossible! The answer to all the meaning of one’s life necessary. Unfortunately, no sooner did the trend for LSD therapy catch on as it was quickly halted by the outlawing of LSD October 6, 1966 after nearly 40,000 patients treated by the psychedelic and literally thousands of scientific studies on the now illicit substance.


Good thing Roger and Jane caught on seemingly months before it’s demise from clinical and psychiatric care. Though still illegal, there are handfuls of individuals who would argue for LSD and its benefits. After all, every man must at some point come face to face with himself, and if life is a journey, having the ability to harness in on elements of your being is powerful. So if LSD can truly facilitate an out of body experience, and the journeyman is of sound mind, no doubt the results could be fantastic.

Recently Dyan Cannon has described her life with Cary Grant, and his obsession with LSD. Her account also includes many eyebrow-raising details of the matinee idol, we otherwise would never have guessed.Just as we always say at The Eye of Faith-  “Everything is not always as it seems”, and so is the case with the seemingly cavalier Grant.

Not surprisingly, the doctors prescribing their methods to Cary Grant were eventually apprehended for their own misuse of the psychedelic drug they had been prescribing. However, this did not stop the fascination with the psyche, and the undeniable portal LSD was giving people into their mind.

It’s powerful stuff potent enough to make someone legitimately go crazy. But, you gotta love how Roger handles his experience. You could almost imagine Roger having a Cary Grant penis rocket ship blast-offing from Earth kind of trip, but the Sterling actually pulls it off from beginning to end, and seems genuinely refreshed from his voyage of discovery.

John Slattery adds great panache and humor to the role, as he always does, and as surprising as it seems, is one of the most probable characters to be put in this situation. Poor Jane, always misunderstood and painfully misguided, if only LSD was really the answer to everything. At least they give her a great sense of style.

Totally feeling the Cleopatra inspiration on Jane’s hair, a very popular movie that was released in 1963, but received a shit load of publicity and press due to Liz’s mood swings and passionate affair with co-star Richard Burton.  There probably wasn’t a shred of paper that didn’t have a story on the now infamous production. Good to see it rubbing off, as it seems most things in magazines do- LSD included.

And if you haven’t seen the episode yet, you got to! Definitely award-worthy on all accounts! Just what everyone loves from the talented team at “Mad Men”. AMC has the clip of Roger and Jane taking acid, so click here if you dare.

Really had a lot of fun writing about this one! Never thought the day would come I could watch Roger Sterling take acid with Angela’s mom. I’d say, things are pretty sweet!

Would love to hear your take! It’s really cool how context shapes perception. The kid definitely seems happy, so what’s the deal?!

Would you take LSD with Angela Chase’s mom? Was Cary Grant totally off his rocker? What do you think? Let us know!

Sincerely,

{[THE EYE]}

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You’re The Only Fashion Time Traveler!

Can you spot the fashion time traveler in this photograph taken in 1941 at the re-opening of the South Forks Bridge in Gold Bridge, British Columbia?

You wouldn’t be the only who spotted the tall dude on the right sporting an edgy pair of shades, and some sort of graphic-T. In fact, the debate is still on as to whether we have a real life time traveler, sophisticated photo manipulation, or just pure fashion forward realness!

The photo was part of the Official Virtual Museum of Canada, which showcases and exhibits thousands of photographs of everyday life throughout the history of Canada. Featured in the exhibit Their Past Lives Here, the photograph has rallied millions of believers, and was featured as a case study in viral Internet phenomenon at the Museums and the Web 2011 conference.

Further research has confirmed the gentleman’s “graphic T” as a sweater with a sewn-on emblem worn in sports, and the “futuristic” sun glasses would actually be seen only several years later on Barbara Stanwyck in the iconic film-noir – Double Indemnity.

Seems like the town’s quarterback maybe jumped practice to check out the new bridge. It says a lot that this gentleman has become such a phenomenon, really. Whether time traveling or not, either way you look at it, the Time Traveler really goes to show the power of style on our perception.

Time is but a rigid system of organization, and really doesn’t condemn a time period to a strict set of rules as most Costume and Clothing History likes to dictate. Whether 1941 or 2012, the Time Traveler in this photo has stood out so much for his unique one-of-a-kind sensibility and ability to stand out in a crowd. The mainstream moves in one direction, but there will always be individuals doing it their own way.

Here at The Eye of Faith we’re always looking to the past and searching  all over for great vintage finds. The power of style is that it is absolutely timeless, so whenever we feel like going back in time we can dress the part.

You can too! Be your own Fashion Time Traveler, and don’t let your perception of time hold you down. Everyone loves a good story, and who knows, maybe in 70 years you will be going viral too!

Let’s transcend time!

Sincerely,

{[THE EYE]}

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day [April 3/2012]

1890-1910, [gentleman in costume embracing a mannequin], François Bruner


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