Tag Archives: early

How to Cook a Unicorn!

EOF- How to cook a Unicorn

“Taketh one unicorne . . .”

Talk about secret knowledge! It seems scholars are absolutely ecstatic to find a long lost Medieval cookbook that includes recipes and instructions for cooking Unicorns!

The book was uncovered by The British Library, and contains hundreds of recipes for classical Medieval dishes that include herring, tripe, fish stews, and pigeon, as well as a delicious recipe for black bird pie – just like the nursery rhyme!

Sing a song of sixpence

A pocket full of rye

 Four-and-twenty blackbirds

Baked in a pie.

But among the most interesting of the dishes presented in the beautifully illuminated pages of the book they believe dates back to the 14th Century, is a most peculiar instruction for the preparation of Unicorn, complete with pictures!

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The recipe begins appropriately with the phrase “Taketh one unicorne” and continues to instruct the cook to take the meat of the beast and marinate in cloves and garlic and then roast it on the griddle. I think I want seconds, already!

Scholars believe the cookbook was written by famed chef of the moment, Geoffrey Fule, who served as the chef to Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Was this all just a jest? Or, could there be some truth to the matter?

Most people assume that Unicorns are only a myth, but perhaps those beautiful ponies with their majestic horns really did roam freely through the lands. Story goes that the unicorn’s horn holds magical properties that could cleanse poisoned waters and render the sick able again. Of course, you could only find them using a virgin. She would wander the forests until the unicorn, smelling the scent of virgin flesh, would greet her with his big hard spiralled horn . . .

LAST UNICORN

Today the unicorn has been reduced to the world animated child fantasy and nursery rhymes, but thousands of years ago, the Ancient Greeks didn’t just believe in the creatures as mythical beings, but as full fledge creatures which they studied and recorded in their natural history texts. We can also find mentions of the animal and its supernatural strength in various books of The Bible.

So, I guess the mystery is just bound to live on. Perhaps Fule was just using his imagination, and jotting down his ideas for a “What-if” kind of situation, but with all that heavy illuminating (which would take months on end), its hard to believe there wouldn’t have been a specific need for a Unicorn recipe. Also note that “COOKING” as we know it today, was much more of a magical and mystical art, especially in the Medieval times and Renaissance; an art that would run parallel to that of alchemy and other sacred knowledge practices.

Many grimoires from the same period will contain recipes for food alongside the details to invocating spirits, so perhaps Fule was not only a reputable chef, but was somewhat of a magician, who knew secrets, such as where to source Unicorn, and the advantages and benefits to eating it . . .

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The idea of eating a unicorn definitely is kind of gross, but I’m sure with the proper preparation it would be tolerable – or just skip the meal and steal the horn from the kitchen wench. Did they once cook Unicorn meat for the King & Queens of England?  It’s still a toss-up for me. What do YOU think?

You can read more at The British Library website!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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{STYLE WISE – SUMMER EDITION} Surf Dudes with Attitude!

EOF Vintage Menswear- Summer Style - 1930s Surf Buddies

While not all the gentlemen seen in this series have surf boards in their hands, they all undeniably possess that wicked spirit of the surf.

Spontaneous, effervescent, and wild like the waves, these are men of the past who have found sanctuary in the beauty of the ocean, and have used its energy to conjure an unbeatable swag, and undeniable attitude.

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We love looking through what people wore, and especially with swimwear, not much has changed. Whether shorts or speedos, the look and style of these basics can still be found today.

And while we don’t wear the one-piece suits anymore, or have to swim with tank tops; these looks are more and more interesting and intriguing. There is some unique stuff there that just needs to come back (striped one-piece, graphic swim tanks) into play!

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Especially with today’s climate, always drifting back to the past for inspiration, I’m sure we’ll be seeing more of these influences in the mix in coming years. If not, we’ll just have to take it on ourselves. Either way – it’s happening.

Check out the amazing pictures we’ve found for you all to get in the swing of Surf, and the attitude that makes it timeless beyond the bleached blonde hair and tubular moods we automatically associate with this lifestyle.

So what do you think? Have things changed that much? There’s no time value on fun in the sun, that’s for sure.

Share you favourite pics with your friends or post to  your own blog

and help showcase {vintage} summer style!!!

Hope you’re keeping cool.

It’s hot.

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DON’T FORGET TO {SHOP}!

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Escape . . .

{SHOP} NOW

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Until we meet again,

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{PHOTO-BLAST} Tattooed Sweethearts . . .

19th Century Tattooed Dandy- Vintage Rebel Photograph- Punk History at The Eye of Faith

“So What” it says. “Who cares?”

The reclaiming of the body by man and woman by taking ink to their skin has always been an aspect of any of our cultures. It has always been a “thing”, as one calls it, and it continues to thrive in our culture, becoming more and more popular in all of the world’s hemispheres . . .

For god sake, even young boy bands are appearing covered in tattoos (Harry Styles of “One Direction” most recently)! In fact, even neck tattoos and other extremities that could only have appeared in our grandparents most horrifying nightmares, are becoming more and more the norm, so how cool/crazy is that?

1920s Tattooed Sweetheart - Beauty is Boudnless- Vintage Style Inspiration- Rebel Society

You can find them all around the world from the streets of Brooklyn to the jungles of Papua New Guinea. The meanings are countless, and the styles evolving everyday. And with technology, and a renewed interest in sanitation, the process has become a lot cleaner, but probably not a bit less painful.

Indeed, we live in times of plenty, so let’s take a moment to look back on some of the more courageous people in the past who were not afraid of trying to make the world and more unique place that embraces our individuality and celebrates it to the highest degree.

Please enjoy this ode to some of the Tattooed Sweethearts who paved the way . . .

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“Show me a man with a tattoo and I’ll show you a man with an interesting past.”

-Jack London

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1950s Photo of Rockabilly Bad Boy Giving His Girlfriend A Back Story - Rebel Style - Fashion Inspiration

Until next time,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {March 15, 2013}

AN INTRUDER WILL THINK TWICE

 

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Why must some things never change?

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august sander

E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {March 13, 2013}

EOF Snapshot - Before Harry Styles - vintage tattoo photograph - getting it done- bad ass- rebel style- classic mens fashion inspiration

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Before Harry Styles . . . 

Tattooed Dandies

They don’t do it like this anymore!

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Take The Oath of The Eyeaugust sander

Life in Motion. Happy Birthday Eadweard Muybridge.

Eadweard J. Muybridge was born Born on the 9th of April 1830 and lived until May 8th 1904.  He was an English photographer who spent much of his professional life in the United Stated.  Born Edward James Muggeridge, he was of Dutch descent. Muggeridge changed his name several times early in his US career. In the 1870s, he changed his first name again to Eadweard, to match the spelling of King Edward shown on the plinth of the Kingston coronation stone.   He is known for his pioneering work on animal locomotion which used multiple cameras to capture motion, and his zoopraxiscope, a device for projecting motion pictures that pre-dated the flexible perforated film strip.

In 1872, former Governor of California Leland Stanford, a businessman and race-horse owner, had taken a position on a popularly-debated question of the day: whether all four of a horse’s hooves are off the ground at the same time during the trot. Up until this time, most paintings of horses at full gallop showed the front legs extended forward and the hind legs extended to the rear.  His Horse in Motion shows that the hooves do all leave the ground simultaneously — although not with the legs fully extended forward and back, as contemporary illustrators tended to imagine, but rather at the moment when the horse’s legs and hooves are tucked beneath as it switches from “pulling” with the front legs to “pushing” with the back legs.

In his studies, Muybridge used a series of large glass-plate cameras placed in a line, each one being triggered by a thread as the horse passed. Later he used a clockwork device to set off the shutters and capture the images. The images were copied in the form of silhouettes onto a disc and viewed in a machine called a zoopraxiscope. This device and process were an intermediate stage toward motion pictures or cinematography. This series of photos stands as one of the earliest forms of videography.
 In 1874, living in San Francisco Bay Area, Muybridge discovered that his wife had a lover, a Major Harry Larkyns. On October 17th, he sought out Larkyns and said, “Good evening, Major, my name is Muybridge and here’s the answer to the letter you sent my wife.” He shot and killed the Major pointblank.  Ultimately he was acquitted for “justifiable homicide” thanks to Stanford who footed his legal fee’s.

Muybridge would go on to dedicate his life to his work and many studies involving motion.   And his exhibitions are still touring today.  It might just be the smoking gun, but we respect and love a true genius who marches to his own beat, and never hesitates at something, or someone standing in his way.
The Eye.

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