Tag Archives: Drama

Lizzie Borden Lies!!! ‘LIZZIE’ Starring Chloë Sevigny + Kristen Stewart

What is our fascination with Lizzie Borden? Is it that she possibly got away with the grisly murders of her father and step mother back in 1892? Oh yes, most definitely a major reason, and its this mystery that keeps fascinating new generations everyday.

We may never know, but that’s the beauty in a good mystery! The spaces between not solidified can be filled with many possibilities, and that’s what the new film “Lizzie” starring Kristen Stewart and Chloë Sevigny seems to explore.

If you know us well, and I hope you do, you know that Chloë Sevigny is just one of those people on the top tiers of everything. Goddess of style, art, a muse to many, and obviously one of the coolest women of all time…so needless to say, we are psyched for this film!

Check out the trailer, and you will see why!

Spicy stuff! Looks like a real nail biter, and the period details are absolutely on-point! Have a little bit of a feel where they are going with the story, but excited to see it play out in real life!

Glad to see Kristen Stewart staying dedicated to unique artful films since her return to the screen.

Two modern muses! SIDENOTE: Can huge Edwardian sleeves just take over the scene, already!!! Can’t wait for more inspiration to come…

Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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{MUSIC MINUTE} “Sunset Boulevard / Main Titles” by Franz Waxman

{circa. 1950}

It has come to my attention that there may be people out there who have no idea about Sunset Boulevard – only one of the best films of all time by iconic director Billy Wilder. This disturbs me slightly, so here’s a glimmer of that inspiration in guise of one of our classic {MUSIC MINUTE}s.

Scored by legendary Hollywood composer Franz Waxman, the moody jazzy score provides the perfect sultry and mysterious backdrop for this strange tale. If I had a dime for every time I said “they don’t make them like they used to” . . . but this film is the epitome of that sentiment.

The film opens as a murder investigation, but delves into the twisted depths of an aging silent movie starlet who coerced a handsome screenwriter to be her live-in gigolo. When he decides its time to leave, things get very . . . dramatic.

Gloria Swanson who was an aging silent movie star herself brings such complexity, vulnerability, and diva strength – you are sure to be shook. On top of that, the film is a gorgeous display of midcentury Hollywood style and glamour; from the grandeur of the mansion (which was also used in Rebel Without a Cause) littered with gold leaf, exotic mouldings, tapestries, and furs to some seriously chic loungewear – there really is inspiration at every turn.

So watch these Main Titles, take in that awesome score, and get yourself a copy of Sunset Boulevard! 

You wont regret it.

Just doing our duty of bring the {past} to the {present} to shape the {future}.

Until next time,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. SNAPSHOT OF THE DAY {JANUARY 16, 2018}

Rarely do we find men who willingly engage in hard, solid thinking. There is an almost universal quest for easy answers and half-baked solutions. Nothing pains some people more than having to think.

-Martin Luther King

 

When you’re right, you’re right . . .

Here’s to better daze ahead!

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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{TRIFECTA} SCULLY // GILLIAN ANDERSON // BLANCHE DUBOIS

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BLANCHE DUBOIS

we love

gillian anderson

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tennesse williams’

‘a streetcar named 

desire’

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THE WAY WE SEE IT,

THIS REALLY COULD BE

A GIFT FROM THE GODS

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PLEASE ENJOY WHILE YOU CAN

Who knows how long it will be available for your viewing pleasure . . .

Absolutely amazing footage of The Young Vic’s masterful production of Tennesse William’s American masterpiece “A Streetcar Named Desire”, starring Ben Foster as Stanley Kowalski and the Queen herself, Gillian Anderson, as Blanche Dubois.

ICONIC, MUCH?

The production brings this timeless story of vanity, lust, shame, misconception, and denial to a very vivid place that truly makes the audience feel like they themselves are somehow teetering a fine line between fantasy and reality. 

I’ve always depended on the kindness of the internet . . . 

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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Commercial Break: Suspiria! (1977)

We had been anticipating watching this one for some time, and finally this past weekend we indulged in a masterpiece called Suspiria! Starring a young Jessica Harper who’s starred in The Phantom of the Paradise and Rocky Horror Picture Show II, and keeps us entertained to this very day as the Crabby Cook.

This is tale of an elite european ballet School where collecting on debt is a ‘charming habit’ of the students(insert the very sexy and very shadey Barbara Magnolfi), and the teacher’s and staff know more about the historic ballet school then they’d ever to let on.

From the Blind Pianist, to a creepy little blonde boy, this flick has got it all, including a killer soundtrack!

Drawn in by the Euro-Horror King, Dario Argento’s name alone, we knew we’d be in for some fun gore, sexy girls, and supernatural spooks, but were clueless to where the story may lead us other than reading a brief synopsis before hand. To our delight, every scene was as beautiful as the last!

With a set as beautiful as any work of art, adorned in blue and red velvet wallpaper, labyrinths of stripes,  a wide assortment of stained glass windows, shiny black lackerred wood panels and door’s, mile high ceilings, and an opulent Serpent staircase we’d love to climb.

We are introduced to the school through the eyes of a wide -eyed newcomer , played by Jessica Harper, who quickly grows suspicious of the happenings within the domineering school.

Upon her arrival, she witness a leggy buck-toothed blond fleeing from the school in a rainstorm, and learns the next morning of the school escapees dreadful fate (emphasis on the wide assortment of stained glass…).

Odd events lead to odder. Must be more than Voodoo? With everyday shrouded in mysteries, it isn’t until our heroin shares her suspicions with her classmate, played by lovely Stefani Casini, that the puzzle truly  begins to come together.  Leading Harper to a Psychiatric Convention and conversations of Witches and Covens.  Speculation leads to proof when it’s realized the Ballet school was founded by a great and powerful Witch who was said to be killed in a fire at the turn of the century.

If you’re a fan of Black Swan or Rocky Horror Picture Show, this one’s for you!

This is no chick flick by any means despite the gaggle of gals in ballet shoes.  Scene after scene, Dario Argento will keep you shocked and in suspense as this tale unravels.  Enjoy the Eyeful of opulence but be prepared for some gross yet charming gut-turning death’s.

Heed our words…This is a great film!!

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SssssssssSsSssss-Susperia! 

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{The Eye of Faith}
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Dandy “Dracula” [an Ode to Ishioka]

“They say you are a man of good… taste. “

-Dracula, Bram Stoker’s Dracula

As fore mentioned in our last post, we are developing quite the affinity for a certain dreamboat of the dark side, and it seems like more and more of the masses have also come under the dandy wrath of Dracula.

With the passing of ultra-talented and internationally acclaimed costume designer Eiko Ishioka (passed on January 21 at the age of 73), we are finding our world more and more drenched with the dark nightmares and dreamscapes her fantasies conjured in designing for Coppola’s visionary 1991 film, Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

A nightmare fantasy realm of dark mystery, elaborate exoticism, blood, seduction, and intrigue which would not have been the same without the remarkable talents of Ishioka who would go on to win the 1992 Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

While her spirit will be missed, the designs she created are of constant value, for they provide much inspiration and insight into reinvention, and taking the reigns on one’s image. Choose a jump point, and really explore it.

That’s what we’ve been up to. Since we’ve been in this dark mode, and with Dracula on the brain, we pulled some pictures to explore OUR take on the Prince of Darkness explored in true E.O.F. style.

DEDICATED TO EIKO ISHIOKA [ R.I.P. 1938 – 2012 ]

Sincerely,

– The Eye x

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Badalamenti Scores! Bringing Twin Peaks to Life with “Laura Palmer’s Theme”

Twin Peaks - Night Time is My Time - Fire Walk With Me

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Sometimes we just get into that Twin Peaks kind of mood. You know when all you can think about is Twin Peaks, and everything about it, and that’s all you’re interested in for a certain amount of time ?

Well, we were having one of those nights (you can tell by our Tumblr, although I prematurely stopped myself, as well as Facebook this morning) and stumbled upon this gem of a moment! A severely magic one, if I do say.

None other than the brilliant musical mastermind Angelo Badalamenti retelling the moments when Twin Peaks came to life with David Lynch by his side talking him through the images in his mind . . . The video was originally from the Twin Peaks: Definitive Gold Box Edition (proud owner of).

You get to see the original keyboard, see the man himself playing the haunting theme, and get to know the inspirations and imagery behind it all. The only thing missing is David Lynch, himself!

I can’t imagine ever getting sick of that score . . .

It’s almost like you’re there. As we said, we are huge Twin Peaks fans so if you haven’t delved – do.

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Until we meet again,

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{theEye}
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Festival De Cannes 2013 Line Up : A Past, Present, and Future of Cinema + Style

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The Festival de Cannes is upon us again, and if you were with us last year, we had a lot of fun covering the ups and downs of this iconic film and fashion event. After all, Cannes is a place where stars are born, and if you’re looking to get ahead of the game (any game, really) its best to stay up to date with all the festivities.

11.vintage cannes 1955 brigitte bardot alain delon

8.vintage natalie wood cannes

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One moment an unknown is sky rocketed to unbelievable heights of stardom, fame, and critical acclaim for just one night at the star-studded gala that has been in existence since 1946.

This year promises to be as extravagant and elegant an affair as ever, with Baz Luhrmann’s epic telling of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” to open the competition. The film promises to bring back the Jazz Age with a roaring velocity only the 21st Century could handle.

Other notable candidates competing for the grand prize, the Palm D’Or, are Joel and Ethan Coen’s “Inside Llewellyn Davis” starring Justin Timberlake and Gatsby co-star Carey Mulligan, Takashi Miike’s “Straw Shield“, François Ozon’s “Young and Beautiful“, Alexander Payne’s “Nebraska“, Roman Polanski’s “Venus in Fur“, and our much-anticipated favourite “Only God Forgives” directed by Nicolas Winding Refn, which offers up a bad-ass vision of crime and the underworld set in the sweltering heat of Thailand and stars Ryan Gosling in the lead role (click here to watch trailer).

Also taking off at the festival is Sofia Coppola’s latest film on the scandal and psychology of “The Bling Ring” – the infamous crew of L.A. socialite-wannabes who took media outlets by storm after being caught in a string of celebrity burglaries. The film kicks off the Un Certain Regard category which also includes James Franco’s “As I Lay Dying“. Based off a novel by William Faulkner, the film is written, directed, and stars the offbeat actor, so hopefully people can start giving the guy a little more credit around these parts!

And if you’re not a fan of the contemporary film scene, not to worry, as the Cannes Film Festival line-up has built in dozens of classic films to showcase and celebrate at this year’s festival, showing that  film past is just as powerful as film present, if not even more. After all, where would we be today without some of the great boundary-breaking films that got us here?

Elizabeth Taylor in “Cleopatra”

Bernardo Bertolucci’s “The Last Emperor”

Alain Delon as Tom Ripley - la pleine soleil

Alain Delon as Tom Ripley in “La Plein Soleil”

These films are icons of style as well as cinema, and include in the line up Alain Resnais’s stunningly poetic “Hiroshima, Mon Amour” (starring “Amour”;s Emanuelle Riva), Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s elaborate and sumptuous “Cleopatra”, Jacques Demy’s charmingly whimsical “Les Parapluies de Cherbourg”, Jean Cocteau’s “La Belle et la Bette” , Bernardo Bertolucci’s vivid 80’s epic “The Last Emperor”, and the creme de la creme of vintage menswear movies “Le Plein Soleil”, starring E.O.F. Style Idol Alain Delon as Patricia Highsmith’s cunning antihero Tom Ripley in Renee Clement’s classic 1960 film.

Another of the classics they are bringing to the screen at this year’s festival is Alfred Hitchock’s 1958 masterpiece “Vertigo”. To celebrate the new restoration of the film, the festival has invited the film’s star, Kim Novak, as the guest of honour to the Festival.

The film was not well-recieved well at all in the US upon its release, and misunderstood it remained for many years before the French propped it up for discussion as proof of Alfred Hitchcock’s auteurism (a term for a true artist of the cinema), so its no surprise to see the film celebrated to this day for its subtle artistry in creating an unsettling dreamlike mood that permeates throughout the entire story of “Vertigo”.

Here I was born, and there I died. It was only a moment for you;

you took no notice.

-Madeleine, “Vertigo”

[POP CULTURE MOMENT: Do you remember hearing the “Vertigo” soundtrack at the beginning of Lady Gaga’s “Born this Way” music video? Listen back to the narrative opening of the full music video and you can hear “Vertigo” ‘s haunting theme . This theme is one of Bernard Hermann’s most iconic compositions, second maybe only to the blitzkrieg of strings in “Psycho”. Click here to see.]


It’s stylish, cool, classy, and the twist at the end is bloody brilliant. There might never be another movie like it. We suggest you rent this classic and make a night in watching this with a glass of vino and pretend you’re at Cannes, then dress up like Jimmy Stewart the morning after.

Check out the official website for the full details and for more information about the 2013 Fesbertival De Cannes. If you can’t be there this year, be sure to check back for more updates as they come!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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God is in the Details: Revealing the Early Renaissance @AGOToronto

Revealing the Renaissance at the AGO - secrets in florentine art - the Peruzzi Altar Piece

Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art (March 16 – June 16, 2013)

ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO (317 Dundas Street West)

$25 adult admission (includes admission to the rest of the gallery)

When thinking of the Renaissance, one might automatically conjure up images of Da Vinci, his Vetruvian man, and Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel. It is a period in history renowned for its surge of creativity, knowledge, and innovation in areas of art, literature, music, architecture, and science.

It is a period that is also become more and more in vogue due to its resurgence in popular culture with T.V. shows like “The Tudors”, “The Borgias”, and the upcoming “Da Vinci’s Demons”, all putting their spin to this exciting and important moment in history.

But, what is rarely captured is the true birth of this period, and the movers and shakers who brought it all to life.

Perhaps its the fact that most art historians do not even know the names of most of the incredible artisans who painstakingly brought the churches of Florence to life with incredibly illuminated manuscripts, carvings, stained glass windows, and beautifully detailed panel paintings, between the years 1300 and 1350, that truly did start it all.

Revealing the renaissance: stories and secrets in florentine art

This is what Sasha Suda and the curators of the Art Gallery of Ontario‘s latest exhibition, “Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art“, aim to bring to the forefront, allowing visitors to explore the lost masterworks that truly sparked a revolution, and would change the face of history forever.

In partnership with the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the curators have painstakingly worked on this exhibition for the past 10 years, travelling far and wide to analyze and bring overseas for the first time some of the most elaborate examples of work from this period that define the breaking point from the flatness of Medieval art to a more expressive and “humanized” perspective that has come to characterize the Renaissance.

Many of these pieces have been shut away from the public for centuries, making this one of the most impressive exhibits the AGO has ever premiered, and one that is sure to capture the imagination of all those lucky enough to visit.

The main gallery at Revealing the early renaissance- stories and secrets in florentine art - AGO- March 12, 2013

Sasha Suda Talks Art With Culture Minister Michael Chan

Curator Sasha Suda talks art with Michael Chan, Ontario Minister of Culture, Tourism, & Sport.  

One might, at first, be intimidated by the prestige of such an exhibit, but fear not, as this portal on the past is as much a reflection of our present day, as it is the 14th Century.

Whether or not you know a great deal about Renaissance art, the exhibition is packed full of information, from the audio guide, to the i-pads strategically placed amongst the exhibition to give you the full backstory on some of the exhibition’s most intriguing pieces. The curators have created an easy to understand story, that truly captures all the excitement and mystery of the artists and the works they created amidst the social context of Florence during this period.

Detail of the Peruzzi Altarpiece - christ wounds- revealing the early renaissance: stories and secrets in florentine art at the AGORevealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO -

God is in the Details . . .

As you first step into the gallery, it may not immediately strike you how these works differ from the Medieval illustrations and paintings you are used to, but upon closer examination, you will find how rich, textured, and full of emotion each piece truly is.

They are not works of art to be admired from afar, but works that deserve an acute eye, and a willingness to get lost in the stories being told within them.

There is a certain excitement generated as you begin to see the layers of colour, and painstakingly small brush strokes that capture the most miniscule details of hair and embroidery. While our culture might be used to multiple images rapidly flashing before our eyes (surely a luxury akin to witchcraft for the men and women of the Renaissance), one must note that the multi-faceted panels and illuminated manuscripts are akin to the cinema of the Renaissance, with all the drama, suspense, horror, and spectacle you could expect from a film of today, with even a bit of special effects here and there.

Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO

An exquisite panel painting. Blood, gore, and devotion. The piece reads almost like an expensive 14th Century comic . . .

It”s all for devotion sake, of course; used to invoke prayer, meditation, deep-thought, or contemplation. There’s definitely that sense of entertainment in the midst, often showcasing the more brutal and tumultuous moments of martyrs and Christ: Agatha with her breasts being cut off, another martyr is grilled on coals in ecstasy, and check out any crucified Christ in the mix and you’re bound to see more than your year’s worth of blood squirt (the most impressive, hands down, being Pacino Di Bonaguido’s “The Crucifixion” from 1315-1320, whose flowing blood rains on the spectators of the scene, as well as a juicy squirt from the chest for the viewer).

The Crucifixion by Pacino Bonaguida at the AGO - March 12, 2013 - Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and secrets in florentine art Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO - Detail of Bonaguida's "THE CRUCIFIXION"

Pacino De Bonaguida’s “The Crucifixion” and Detail of (1315-1320)

And while, we might cringe at the sight of this, its patrons felt the bloodshed and pain was the human aspect of their faith, and that one day perhaps, they may themselves reach divination, as did their faithful predecessors.

Getting lost in each piece, you begin to see that this society was obsessed with their idols, and their chance to be a part of them was as easy as getting a master to paint them into a panel or manuscript. In essence, it equated a wealthy merchant to the status of celebrity, having made his way onto the pages alongside the kingdom of heaven complete with Christ, the Virgin, and all the many martyrs who gave their life to the dedication of their fate.

The most entertaining example of this is the Laudario of Sant’Agnesse; an illuminated choir book commissioned by the Compagnia di Sant’Agnese, a fraternity of merchants, for use in charitable events and prayer, and who are also illustrated along the margins of the music. This remarkable collection of 24 illustrated manuscripts have been framed and reunited for the first time since the early 1800s, and will be performed by musical guests Lionheart on April 6 in the Walker Court of the AGO (click for more details).

Detail of Daddi's "Crowned Virgin Martyr" - Revealin ghte Early Renaissance at the AGO - Toronto

Detail of “A Crowned Virgin Martyr {Catherine of Alexandria}” (1334 – 1338) by Bernardo Daddi. 

It is amazing to think that at one time, masters like Botticelli, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Michelangelo must have set their gaze on these exact works to hone their own craft, and garner inspiration to create the masterpieces of the Renaissance we marvel at today. For when staring at the suggestive expression of Bernardo Daddi’s “A Crowned Virgin Martyr” (1334-1338), a glimpse of Da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa”  with her mysterious stare, and face full of subtle shadows that delicately sculpt her face, can definitely be seen,  which make the exhibition all the more exciting, and relevant.

In many ways, the exhibition brings to light that not much has changed in the world of art and commerce; citing the importance of banking and the prosperous merchant class to the creation of these vital works of art. Being so wealthy, members of the merchant class became so concerned that they may not  reach heaven, that they began spending their fortunes on commissioning buildings, and filling them with new art that expressed their hopes, fears, ideals, and emotions.

Revealing the Early Renaissance at the AGO-A view of Bernardo Daddi Italian The Martyrdom of Saint Ursula and 11,000 Virgins

With prosperity, comes art – and not much has changed today, as many of the world’s most successful artists rely on wealthy investors and corporate big wigs to the cut the cheque on a commission. Perhaps they no longer fear purgatory for their sins, but they are most definitely keeping their fingers crossed that their commission could strike them big dollars, and in that way, achieve idol status, and a bit of heaven.

The exhibition has already been lauded by the Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times as one of the most important exhibitions in recent years, so don’t miss out on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to travel through time, and take in 90 once-hidden masterworks that came to redefine life as we know it today.

Agony and the Ecstacy - Blood and Gore - Revealing the Early Renaissance at the AGO

All the Agony & The Ecstacy . . .

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Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art” opens at the AGO on March 16 and runs until June 16, 2013. To book your tickets today, click here!

Also be sure to check out the event schedule at the AGO for exciting insights inspired by this latest exhibit (Click here).

Sasha Suda, Michael Chan (Ontario Minister of Culture), and CEO at the AGO, Matthew Teitelbaum - March 12, 2013 - AGO Press Preview

Matthew Teitelbaum (CEO at the AGO), Sasha Suda (Assistant Curator of European art at the AGO), and Michael Chan (Ontario Minister of Culture, Tourism, & Sport) – March 12, 2013. 

Until next time,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {February 18, 2013}

Paul and Lydia M - Lost Film Stills Series - 2012

{Paul H + Lydia M – Lost Scene Stills From a Film – Original Photograph by Aaron Duarte (2012) }

It’s just that Daze of Being Wild . . .

Check out our original editorials for more vintage musings come to life.

Rock stars, rebels, bad boys, and bad girls; devils, demons, ghosts, and prophets

{e.o.f. editorials} are another way to escape the everyday . ..

+LIFE IS A MOVIE AND YOU ARE THE STAR – SO DRESS TO IMPRESS, DAMN IT+

Also be sure to visit the {SHOP} – things have really been flying this month,

So best get it while you still have the chance!

Remember codex XIXIXI

Don’t forget to spread the word . . .

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Until next time,

{theEye}

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