Tag Archives: disease

Manic Monday: Hysteric for Charcot’s Mysterious Medical Muses

Charcot - Frighteningly Real

Charcot {29 November 1825 – 16 August 1893}

Remembered today as a leading mind in the fields of neurology and psychology, Jean-Martin Charcot‘s legacy is as much in his strange medical photography, as his famous pupils (Sigmund Freud and Georges Gilles de la Tourette), and important breakthroughs in the field.

Taken for research purposes, these bizarre medical photographs were used to document the various affects and disorders of the 19th century’s most scandalous disorder – Female Hysteria.

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Charcot- Say Hello To My God- Science and Faith - Art and Reality- Vintage Style

For thousands of years, hysteria has plagued the medical community as a bit of a mystery. Known as “the wandering womb” by Hippocrates since the Ancient Greeks, the known method for treatment was almost always pregnancy until the 19th Century when a vaginal massage and/or stimulation using a vibrator or water hose administered by your family doctor was the modern approach.

Charcot, however, was interested in the minds of these plagued women, and hoped to use one of technology’s latest advancements, photography, to aid his research.

Charcot- vintage medical photography- wild history

Charcot - The Ladies - Magic Medical Mystery (x4)

Charcot - Many Faces and Treatments - Art and Medicine

What resulted is a macabre collection of photographs that capture terrifying and strange lost moments between doctor and patient. He took these photographs over the course of many years with hundreds of different women, as well as men (murderers and convicts) to decipher the physical codes of the world’s most confusing ancient tradition – madness.

The Eye of Faith- Charcot - Strange Behaviour

Charcot - Twisted Sister

Charcot - Vintage Style - Design Wise - Images - Man Alive

Although some of his attendants and colleagues who describe these photography sessions as highly staged, with Charcot demanding perfection of the moment that usually occurred back at the hospital, beyond the truthful eyes of the 19th Century camera. He painstakingly ensured the detail captured in each photograph was true to, what he thought, was the true depiction of the disease and its many characteristics.

Charcot- Master Mystery Tour- Vintage Medical Photography- Hysteric

 

The photographs are very specific and plain. No out of element lighting techniques or off angles – just the subject, and their explicit diagnoses. What came through is a very disturbing display.

The photographs were used to illustrate the true nature of this neurological disorder to a society fascinated by the elaborate and unusual. While many of the women were unable to be treated for their “problems”, they remain unforgettable figures of our modern life.

L0034940 Series of three photos showing a hysterical screaming woman

Today, they are as awesome and curious as ever, with hardly anything in our contemporary culture to compare these majestic and mysterious medical muses.

We really wanted to share. Don’t get hysteric!

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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Music Minute: Poison Ivy – The Coasters(1959) + {Bonus: The Aztecs(1964)}

Written by American songwriting duo Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, Poison Ivy was originally recorded by The Coasters in 1959. It went to #1 on the R&B chart and #7 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

The duo would write a string of hits which would lead them to rise to fame in the 50s teaming up with other writers and writing hits themselves.  Some famous songs include “Hound Dog“, “Jailhouse Rock” “Stand By Me” “On Broadway“.

About a girl names Ivy, calling her “Poison Ivy” because of the girls reputation.  In a recently published biography about Jerry Lieber & Mike Stoller, the song’s authors, it was confirmed that they also intended Ivy’s “poisonous” nature to be a code for her actually carrying a sexually-transmitted disease. She is compared to measles, mumps,chickenpox, the common cold, and whooping cough, but is deemed worse, because “Poison Ivy, lord, will make you itch.” The song also makes references to other flowers such as a rose and a daisy.

Poison Ivy grew to be covered The Rolling Stones recorded two different versions in 1963, the second version appeared on the EP The Rolling Stones, released early 1964.  The Hollies recorded a version in the 1960s, The Romantics – on the 1985 album, Rhythm Romance.

We love all versions of this hit, but we’ve tracked down a version on youtube by Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs from 1964 that we really wanted to share with our readers.  Maybe not the original (a hard performance to find by the Coasters) but we love a little Aztec Enchantment, and the mid 60s groove in the video above!

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Music Minute: “Dear God” – XTC (1986)

Whenever we question our own reality and or think about our New Dracula Shades, this is one of the tunes that jumps into our Head’s and gets our toe’s tappin’.  We’re lover’s of the hippie glasses and  penchant for Hats, not to mention overall gentlemanly style of this English Invasion.

Not only is the message frank, but the statements linger and in a sea of pop act’s who sing about drivel, we find it very refreshing to find a group who aren’t afraid to say how they really feel!  Especially here at The Eye of Faith, a rebellious song questioning the existence of God is right up our alley!

From Swindon, England, XTC was active between 1977 and 2005. The band enjoyed some chart success, including the UK and Canadian hits you may recall; “Making Plans for Nigel” (1979) and “Senses Working Overtime” (1982)

First coming together in 1972, the core duo of Andy Partridge (guitars & vocals) and Colin Moulding (bass & vocals) went through many band names. Possible names being The Helium Kidz and Star Park, it wasn’t until 1976 the band settled on the name XTC.

With provoking lyrics like “Did you make disease, and the diamond blue? Did you make
mankind after we made you? And the Devil too!” it’s no wonder this New Wave group stirred up quite the sensation with the God fearing crowd worldwide.

“I won’t believe in heaven and hell. No saints, no sinners, no
devil as well. No pearly gates, no thorny crown. You’re always
letting us humans down. The wars you bring, the babes you
drown. Those lost at sea and never found, and it’s the same the
whole world ’round. The hurt I see helps to compound that
Father, Son and Holy Ghost is just somebody’s unholy hoax,
and if you’re up there you’d perceive that my heart’s here upon
my sleeve. If there’s one thing I don’t believe in

it’s you….”

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