Tag Archives: discovery

How to Cook a Unicorn!

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“Taketh one unicorne . . .”

Talk about secret knowledge! It seems scholars are absolutely ecstatic to find a long lost Medieval cookbook that includes recipes and instructions for cooking Unicorns!

The book was uncovered by The British Library, and contains hundreds of recipes for classical Medieval dishes that include herring, tripe, fish stews, and pigeon, as well as a delicious recipe for black bird pie – just like the nursery rhyme!

Sing a song of sixpence

A pocket full of rye

 Four-and-twenty blackbirds

Baked in a pie.

But among the most interesting of the dishes presented in the beautifully illuminated pages of the book they believe dates back to the 14th Century, is a most peculiar instruction for the preparation of Unicorn, complete with pictures!

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The recipe begins appropriately with the phrase “Taketh one unicorne” and continues to instruct the cook to take the meat of the beast and marinate in cloves and garlic and then roast it on the griddle. I think I want seconds, already!

Scholars believe the cookbook was written by famed chef of the moment, Geoffrey Fule, who served as the chef to Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Was this all just a jest? Or, could there be some truth to the matter?

Most people assume that Unicorns are only a myth, but perhaps those beautiful ponies with their majestic horns really did roam freely through the lands. Story goes that the unicorn’s horn holds magical properties that could cleanse poisoned waters and render the sick able again. Of course, you could only find them using a virgin. She would wander the forests until the unicorn, smelling the scent of virgin flesh, would greet her with his big hard spiralled horn . . .

LAST UNICORN

Today the unicorn has been reduced to the world animated child fantasy and nursery rhymes, but thousands of years ago, the Ancient Greeks didn’t just believe in the creatures as mythical beings, but as full fledge creatures which they studied and recorded in their natural history texts. We can also find mentions of the animal and its supernatural strength in various books of The Bible.

So, I guess the mystery is just bound to live on. Perhaps Fule was just using his imagination, and jotting down his ideas for a “What-if” kind of situation, but with all that heavy illuminating (which would take months on end), its hard to believe there wouldn’t have been a specific need for a Unicorn recipe. Also note that “COOKING” as we know it today, was much more of a magical and mystical art, especially in the Medieval times and Renaissance; an art that would run parallel to that of alchemy and other sacred knowledge practices.

Many grimoires from the same period will contain recipes for food alongside the details to invocating spirits, so perhaps Fule was not only a reputable chef, but was somewhat of a magician, who knew secrets, such as where to source Unicorn, and the advantages and benefits to eating it . . .

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The idea of eating a unicorn definitely is kind of gross, but I’m sure with the proper preparation it would be tolerable – or just skip the meal and steal the horn from the kitchen wench. Did they once cook Unicorn meat for the King & Queens of England?  It’s still a toss-up for me. What do YOU think?

You can read more at The British Library website!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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Mad Memories- Photographing Suitcases from New York State Mental Asylum

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In 1995, 400 suitcases were recovered from the attic of the Willard State Asylum in Upstate New York. Many patients died at the asylum and were buried in graves marked only by numbers. For many, these suitcases are the only traces left of these sad, lost, and lonely lives.

{click here to watch a creepy video infiltrating the now abandoned Willard State Asylum}

Dating between 1910 and 1960, photographer Jon Crispin has begun the chilling endeavour of cataloguing each suitcase and the contents therein. These people were deemed unfit for society, but Crispin’s photographs reveal a tragic humanity to the individuals whose memory remain in the mysterious objects and photos in these many bags and luggages.

Being the lovers of mystery we are, we couldn’t help but share some of these photos with you here, and the strange enigma they leave for us to ponder.

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[SOURCE: Daily Mail]

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Voyage of Discovery: Living “Barefoot in Paradise”

Known as the most beautiful restaurant on the beach at Wakiki, The Queen’s Surf was a highly popular restaurant and nightclub in Hawaii throughout the 1950s and 60s, gaining popularity as the yearnings for the mythologies of paradise became more and more prevalent in popular culture!

Tourists from all over flocked to The Queen’s Surf for the music, a tropical drink, amazing traditional Hawaiian food unlike anything served on the mainland, and most of all, the “Hula Cop” who entertained nightly at the famous Barefoot Bar.

The “Hula Cop” was none other than Sterling Mossman, a native Hawaiian who was famous for his wild double life; by day he acted as a Detective for the Honolulu Police Department, and by night would make the transformation to ultra suave and charming impresario and ambassador of Hawaiian culture at the Barefoot Bar.

The Mossmans have always had a special place in Hawaiian culture as a family dedicated to bringing their island’s traditions to the public forefront. In the 1920s, the Mossman family had owned and operated the “Lalani Hawaiian Village”; the first of its kind, an outdoor venue that displayed and sold traditional Hawaiian gifts and objects to tourists – it was closed with the outbreak of WWII.

The Queen’s Surf was a one-of-a-kind experience that is still remembered today for its Hollywood calibre entertainment (with Sterling Mossman doing much of the entertaining himself), and their fantastic full course traditional Luaus; held on the beach, they would definitely give tourists something to remember their trip by. A true taste and feel for life on the islands…

This visceral and enchanting experience, both luxurious and primitive, was something new, right on the brink alongside books, films, and TV Shows set against Hawaii’s lush landscape.

Excited to encapsulate on the growing curiosity and interest towards all things Hawaiian, Sterling Mossman was approached by friend and businessman Clarence Hara who seeked out Mossman to use the “Barefoot”  in the design of a new label of clothing dedicated to the Hawaiian life and style!

Decorating the walls of the Barefoot Bar were “Barefoot” symbols on signs, as well as wallpaper decorating the space. These “Barefoot” symbols became the signature for a new label inspired by Mossman, called “Barefoot in Paradise”…

“Barefoot in Paradise” was a brand known for it’s unique prints, high quality fabric, and attention to detail. It was everything you would expect from the brand that represented the “Hula Cop” – fun, fresh, dynamic, stylish, and most of all, tasteful.

In fact, Sterling Mossman (and his Barefoot Gang) would only continue to rise in popularity as novels like John Michener’s “Hawaii” became huge hits, and TV shows like the 1959 series Hawaiian Eye (based loosely on Sterling himself)  took the airwaves by storm!

Mossman would later appear in an episode of the series, as well as being featured in the pilot of Hawaii-Five O in 1968, in a set modeled after his famous bar.

Sadly, on December 31,  1969 the Queen’s Surf closed its doors, and in 1971, the historic building was demolished leaving only the memories of luaus past and legends of Hollywood glory. Over 700 people showed up for the chance to sit in the bar for one last time, and the chance to rub shoulders with a star.

Go Barefoot, as the brand is called today, still exists sans the actual “Barefoot” logo that had given birth to the brand. In the 1970s “Barefoot” sold their logo to the iconic surf brand Hang Ten, and carried on with producing Hawaiian shirts – but something was different. Somehow, it was just not the same.

Today, there are those who still reminisce about the good ole days at the Queen’s Surf. Perhaps you have your own stories. We’d love to hear them if you do. For more information, TikiCentral has been a great resource in learning more about these legends and contains tons of information on other pop culture tidbits regarding Tiki and Polynesian culture!

At the Eye of we are proud to include an amazing piece from the genesis of the “Barefoot in Paradise” brand. This rare shirt is an early example of the brand’s commitment to quality and material, as well as their daring approach to graphics and design.

The shirt features a menagerie of motifs dedicated to the concept of voyage and discovery; no doubt an ode to the many voyagers who made their way to the islands of Hawaii, turning it into the bright and culturally diverse haven it is today.

A piece of history that explains history in a fun and exciting way! You definitely do not see that very often.

All this history makes me thirsty for a Zombie, though!

Hope we capitalized on a few interesting points…

Part of the fun with vintage clothes is the stories behind them, so we are more than pleased to give you the upper hand when it comes to finding something {amazing}!

 

Thanks a lot for reading! Hope we got you smelling those fresh cut pineapples and cool ocean breeze for the rest of the day! If you have any questions or stories, email the.eye.of.faith@gmail.com

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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Music Minute: Drugstore Midnight (1960s Instrumental) with BONUS Photoblast!


Take a listen to this fantastic instrumental from the 1960s. We did, and ever since, we sure haven’t been the same…

From France, comes this cool retro beat that will get you on your feet! It’s hard not to dance once you hit play.  Your Mojo will be bubbling and you will not be able to sit your ass down!

We had to share this one with you guys! We haven’t found TOO much information about this great instrumental, so we reckon’ maybe one of our readers will be enlightened and can enlighten US.  In the meantime, enjoy this tune and some great pictures that danced their way into this post!

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Tour the Junction: Masonic Mondays

[Photo Source: James Ellis: Architect of the Junction]

Nearly two years ago, when we relocated to Toronto’s historic Junction neighborhood, we were drawn to the area’s rich culture and history.

Most famously, the Junction is known to have jump started Prohibition laws, declaring a community-wide ban on alcohol in 1904 that lasted voluntarily up into the year 2000!

Not that the people of the Junction don’t enjoy a good time. In fact, the neighborhood is more alive than ever housing dozens of thriving businesses that include Galleries, Antiques, Organic & Raw Foods, Books, Gyms, and Clothing.

In an article by the New York Times, the Junction was even compared to Aboott Kinney Boulevard in Venice, California, for it’s cool digs and industrial vibe, naming it “Skid Row Hip”. Not bad, Junction! Way to go!

One of the coolest places you can make your way to would definitely have to be the Toronto West Masonic Temple on the corner of Annette & Pacific, just beside the beautiful Annette Street Toronto Public Library. The two buildings were built by architect James August Ellis (1856-1935).

The construction of the building began in 1909, and remains one of the finest and most impressive Masonic Temples in the country, and many of the Temple’s earliest members became movers and shakers in the community.

The Temple’s design is based on actual descriptions of King Solomon’s Temple in Jerusalem, and the shape, and configuration of rooms have been arranged to correspond with the actual layout and decoration of the ancient temple.

The Temple was built without any windows, as so Non-Masons cannot illicitly learn any of the Masonic activities that take place within it’s walls. The Temple is active and currently still in use by members of the Prince of Wales Lodge 630 and Victoria Lodge 474.

The Temple is striking in it’s simplicity, especially beside the Beaux-Arts grandeur of the Annette Street Library next door. I can’t help but wonder how the two buildings function so close together. The library, a source of knowledge, the Temple, also a source of knowledge…sacred secret knowledge.

The two buildings were designed by the same architect, and perhaps hold more secrets than knowledge. But as with most things Masonic, everything is in plain view. The Temple’s doors depict the Square and Compass, the Sun, and the Royal Arch (another Masonic organization).

Above is a stained glass pentagram, an ancient symbol that defines man.

It may seem sinister, but in fact, a five pointed star alludes simply to humanity. Five fingers, five toes, five senses, five stages of life (birth, adolescence, coitus, parenthood and death). Five wounds of Christ on the cross. Five Pillars of the Muslim faith, alongside five daily prayers. Even the Wiccan kiss is fivefold- feet, knees, womb, breasts, and lips.

“Audi, Vidi, Tace” / “I see, I hear, and I am Silent”

[Slogan for the United Grand Lodge of Canada]

[Photo Source: PICCSY]

Drawing a pentagram you may also notice it only takes a single line. Where you start the pentagram, you also finish it.

This symbolizes the journey of man from birth to God. This is the plight of every Mason, to attain a destiny higher than that of this Earth. The rites and rituals held within these brick walls would help the initiates achieve this destiny.

Five is also symbolic of Mars, God of War to the Greeks, and Horus to the Egyptians. It signifies severity, conflict and harmony through conflict….(interesting)

The primary belief of the Masonic brotherhood is that of the Supreme Being. This extends beyond the context of any organized religion, and focuses on the primary life force at work with us on the day to day, as well as the  origins of Man, and our inherent destiny.

Since the Middle Ages, Masons have been the source of speculation and controversy, and were persecuted by the Church in the same manner as those accused of sorcery. Since the Masonic tradition is centered around the Supreme Being, religious fundamentalists often point to this as a conflict of interest to the one and only true God. What the F is with that?

Hundreds of books have been written on the subject, which seems to be growing more and more in the popular media, so it’s definitely good to dig and do some real reading on the subject as not to get carried away by myths, folklore, and the lengths Hollywood will go to exploit and entertain.

As for the West Toronto Masonic Temple, it remains as enigmatic as it appears in my pictures. Strong and noble, it’s simplicity speaks. There are no secrets to it, really. The words MASONIC TEMPLE are boldly engraved on the front of the building, and ask any Mason about their secret society – the first thing you might learn is that it’s not secret, whatsoever.

In fact, all you have to do is ask, and you can join (as long as you are 21, believe in a Supreme Being, are Male, and have reference from two members). Invitations are strictly forbidden, so expressing your interest is the key. Also, don’t expect immediate riches or status, as every man ultimately creates his own destiny.  The primary goals of each Lodge are charity and the community.

Click here to learn more.

<<TORONTO WEST MASONS OFFICIAL SITE>>

Directly across the way from the West Toronto Masonic Temple is an interesting addition to the community.

The Victoria Lofts are one of the stand-out new developments in the neighborhood, and it’s presence cannot be missed. Standing straight across from the Library & Masonic Temple, the new condos have made their home in what used to be the Victorian Presbyterian Church.

It’s an impressive complex, and it’s near impossible not to say ” I wish I lived there”, especially checking out the church’s impressive steeple.

There are definitely many churches on this strip at Annette, and it’s very interesting to see one of the largest and oldest being converted into luxury lofts for young professionals in the area.

[Source: Google Maps]

Seeing as the Church operated for over 120 years, it’s hard to imagine living amongst the walls built on what was once sacred hallowed ground. I guess it still is, really. And the close proximity of the Masonic Temple to the Presbyterian Church, is also something interesting to query.

This, among other things, make walking down Annette a true joy, and completely helped us fulfill our Masonic Monday! So, definitely if you’re in the area, you’re best to check out the corner of Pacific and Annette for a little history, as well as conjure a bit of mystery….

Make sure to check out our E.O.F.  MASTER {MASON} Style!

[All photos, unless noted, were taken by and are property of The Eye of Faith.com]

Sincerely,

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R.I.P. Neil Armstrong {August 5, 1930 – August 25, 2012}/First Man To Walk on the Moon

R.I.P.

Neil Armstrong

 The First Man To Walk on the Moon…

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“Mystery creates wonder and wonder is the basis of man’s desire to understand.”

Neil Armstrong

He sure stands for something in this world. The first man to set foot on the lunar surface. It’s absolutely incredible to think how far we’ve come…

It’s all so strange, really. How far is it all really?

“I think we’re going to the moon because it’s in the nature of the human being to face challenges. It’s by the nature of his deep inner soul… we’re required to do these things just as salmon swim upstream.”

Neil Armstrong

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Just some thoughts.

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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Happy Birthday Howard Carter! (9 May 1874 – 2 March 1939)

Howard Carter was born in London, England, the son of Samuel Carter, a skilled artist, who trained him to follow in his footsteps, and Martha Joyce (Sands) Carter.  Born eager and inquisitive, at 17, the young talented artist was sent out by the Egypt Exploration Fund to assist Percy Newberry in the excavation and recording of Middle Kingdom tombs at Beni Hasan.  Even at that young age he was innovative in improving the methods of copying tomb decoration.

On 4 November 1922, Carter’s excavation group found the steps leading to Tutankhamun‘s tomb ,  by far the best preserved and most intact pharaonic tomb ever found in the Valley of the Kings.

Carter made the “tiny breach in the top left hand corner” of the doorway, and was able to peer in by the light of a candle and see that many of the gold and ebony treasures were still in place. He made the breach into the tomb with a chisel his grandmother had given him for his seventeenth birthday. He did not yet know at that point whether it was “a tomb or merely a cache”, but he did see a promising sealed doorway between two sentinel statues. When Carnarvon asked “can you see anything?”, Carter replied with the famous words: “Yes, wonderful things.”

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Commercial Break: Swamp Girl (1971)


From out of the waters comes a film different than any others from its time.  Full of relative unknowns, this adventure is the story of a young girl who was abandoned as a child in the swamp by her parents as a child, and was raised by a black man she calls “Pa”.  The Young blonde women takes it onto herself to defend her swamp and everything living there!

Enjoy,
The Eye.

Let us Guide You.