Tag Archives: dazzle

{Let’s do the Time-Warp Again} Best of the 80’s in Menswear Spring 2013


The best fashion is timeless, so no surprises here at the Eye of Faith we are always trying to reinvent the classic’s through modern interpretations of the best basics!  We love to pick out different era’s and reference those ‘era-descent’ influences in our current looks.  We are so happy to see the latest runway shows from around the world are straight up our alley!

From London-town, to Paris and Milan, there is an undeniable 80s influences in most of the shows from this coming Spring 2013 Season.

Weather it’s through unconventional Metallics or lace, or acid washed hair, dyed to perfection.  We love when we can see the past turn it’s cheek and rock it’s way into a jagged-edged future.


A wise man once said “Everything’s already been done”, but we hate to think there isn’t room for anything new at all! We aren’t talking about reinventing the wheel here, but we do miss the days of David Bowie’s gender bending orange head of hair, and Billy Idol’s undeniable sexual swagger.

The greatest idols of the 80s are back in a big way, and all their razzle and dazzle is back on display though the Spring 2013 Menswear season (Through you’d swear this might be 1983).

  

Staring with one of our all-time favourites, Burberry Prorsum is always classic at it’s finest, with Christopher Bailey at the helm, we are always captivated by his modern spin on tradition.  Described as an exercise in contrasts, this Spring collection has a bit of everything—matte versus shine, traditional versus tribal, strict versus oversized. Mylar-esque metallic trench coats and shiny silk shirts play off the brand’s fitted wool suiting. Classic outerwear pieces evolve as well, with Bailey interpreting mac jackets in the new fabrications and turning the classic bomber into a cropped cocoon, worn over a business suit. Bailey explores new territory, while keeping one well-burnished foot firmly planted in the house’s heritage.

  

Anne Demeulemeester always kills it for us, with a spin at modernist edgy, and classic vampire fashion.  What’s more nostalgic of the glam decadence of the 80s than gothic-chic suiting, and lush fabrics fit for Royalty.  Running the gamut from solids to stripes to prints, and relaxed silhouettes, Ms. Demeulemeester’s spring collection seethes with a dark-prince edge—indeed.  From Prince to Keith Richards, any rock star, past and present, would rock these looks on stage.

  

Comme des Garçons always has been an absolutely innovative brand season after season, so no surprises here that they would take influence straight from the Laboratory.  So maybe the nod to 90s cartoon Dexters Laboratory isn’t so totally 1980s, but you can’t deny us the bold black and whites and orange coloured hair are straight out of a 80s hair catalogue in the best possible way (Annie Lennox anyone?!).  Every look included matching trouser-and-shirt combos with topcoats: in sterilized white, pinstriped, with toggles, or with doodled print panels, with a slender silhouette billowing down below the waist.  Menswear at it’s finest, Dexter’s Laboratory‘s eponymous kid genius would be proud.

After that, we want to run out to the nearest vintage store, and try to scrounge up some pieces that will elevate us to an 80’s icons level!  If you need us we’ll be Dancing with Ourselves, and watching every season of Jem and the Holograms.

We hope you’ve found inspiration in our recap of the latest show’s, with a touch of the past. Remember even if it’s ‘been done’, we know it can be done better! The 80s wouldn’t of been possible without the emblematic era’s that came before.  Honour the past, present and future!

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{The Eye of Faith}
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Fancy and Folly: Giving Me The Silent Treatment

When I first saw the trailers for “The Artist“, shortly after it’s premier at the Cannes Film Festival that would lead to Jean Dujardin’s Best Actor win at the prestigious art festival, I was not impressed. Silly folly, I thought. Reductive (Thanks, Madonna). Wasted Inspiration. How could this “NEW” silent film set in th 20s really make a splash? There was no way, in my mind, that the audiences of 2011 would really appreciate the novelty…but surprisingly, they did!

Don’t know what it is about this one (as I’m still stubbornly NOT seeing it) that really taps a chord with everyone these days, but one thing is certain we have a hit on our hands! Picking up seven wins at the British Academy Awards last night, the film is continuing it’s unbeatable winning streak all the way to the Oscars.

Granted, the recreation of the 1920s looks great (especially costumes by first-time Academy Award nominee Mark Bridges, who painstakingly recreated designs from the 20s), not to mention Du Jardin’s charisma and winning smile, but there seems to be something so defeatist about watching a silent film made in 2012.

Why do I need to see this? I have seen many silent films, some of which are the most impressive pieces of film making, or dare I say ART, I’ve ever seen: “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” (1920), “Birth of a Nation”(1915) , “Intolerance”(1916), “The Gold Rush”(1925), “Metropolis”(1927), “Voyage to the Moon” (1902), and “Pandora’s Box” (1929) are all some of the most important films ever made, as well as full of some of the most visually arresting images of all time.

 

All these films were made before sound became an unstoppable force in making movies. Before this time, the power of image and word, and the novelty of the moving image was enough to begin a revolution that would become Hollywood. And don’t think that because these films were made without sound that they are PG fair, because most silent classics are full of adultery, scandal, ghosts, vampires, drugs, sex, violence, and witches- all the things we love at The Eye of Faith, minus the rock n’ roll!

Watching the films of that time are magical in itself, as it’s probablly the closest any of us could ever get to time travel in our lifetime. It’s fascinating getting lost in Louise Miller’s beautiful bow lips, or catching Valentino’s devilish gaze- these celluloid dreams are the closest thing we have to these faded idols of yesteryear and their long lonst lost time. Having been made on film, we are getting a literal imprint of a moment in time playing out before our eyes. Absolute magic!

Back in those days, they didn’t have any of the technology we have today to make movies- all you had was a team full of people and a whole lot of passion to try to tell your story. Even “The Artist” couldn’t escape from having the shoot the film first in Colour, to then digitally manipulate the film to the lauded black and white photogrpahy being praised today.

Back in the 1920s, there is no way they would have shot a film only to have to redo it completely somewhere else; if time meant money now, time really meant money in those days- but today in 2012, I’m afraid that time for these jewels only means edging closer and closer to obscurity.

Ultimately, it’s about love for movies in general. I cannot fault director Michel Hazanavicius’ vision, bringing his ode to Silent Era to the masses, and hopefully with it’s growing popularity the film can also bring some love to the real classics of the 1910s and 1920s. However, I can’t help but think “The Artist” may even further dampened our view of the true days of Hollywood Babylon. Reductive.

Many people, like myself, see all the promos for “The Artist” and can’t see past the gimmick of it all. (I mean, REALLY?!!) Hopefully this doesn’t taint the idea of watching a real classic- seeing as you can watch a “NEW” one. Or maybe I’m being much too cynical and everything is jolly! It’s great to see so much love for the past, in general though. Perhaps simply, the time of nostalgia has really struck.

Throughout the years, silent films have provided an endless source of inspiration. Luckily, many silent films are being restored and archived so future generations can enjoy the magic of the past. Watching a silent film, you can almost feel lucky, as if somehow you have found a hidden doorway to the past, and luckily you can stay there (at least for an hour or two).

Lest we forget from whence we came, and enjoy a piece of the puzzle today!

We’ve included a scene from 1928’s “The Laughing Man” (a precursor to Batman’s iconic villain The Joker) for your viewing pleasure.

[And if you have a lot of time on your hand OpenFlix on Youtube has a ton of Full Length classic films for Free including the 1922 Swedish Documentary HAXAN on the History of Witchcraft!!! Silent and Spooky. Click Here.]

Now you have a good trajectory. So, have fun!!!

[PORTLANDIA:SEASON 2]

 

Sincerely,
{theEye}

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