Tag Archives: bbc

{WEIRD T.V.} “Silent Twins: Without My Shadow” (1994)

So, its probably safe to say we all love a break from the status-quo when it comes to what to watch . . . we are all fed the same things via Netflix, cable, etc. but sometimes you find yourself thirsting for something off the beaten path that truly quenches that need for the weird, the wonderful, and the strange!

That’s why we are starting this new series we aptly have named {WEIRD T.V.}!

We know many of you fine viewers continue to come back to our site because we aim to offer something a bit more eclectic and unique than your average blog, and have been searching the depths of the interwebs for gems dying to be rediscovered!

We’re gonna present the first video in this series, “Silent Twins: Without My Shadow” which was a BBC special that premiered in 1994 about the strange case of  June and Jennifer Gibbons AKA The Silent Twins.

The bizarre story of these twin girls from the UK first caught our eye on the vlogosphere with several Youtubers telling the strange tale, but this first-hand account includes amazing insight from doctors and journalists who followed the girls’ case since they were young, as well as their parents, and remarkable excerpts from their many journals and short stories.

We don’t want to reveal too much, because the story truly unfolds in such an odd and fantastic way that you really just have to give yourself over to this oddity of a tale.

The story is UNBELIEVABLE! So, If you need a good weird before bed something to watch – this is IT!!!

Alas, we hope you enjoy our first entry into our {WEIRD T.V.} category, and hope you come back for more!

 

Let us know what you thought in the COMMENTS below!

 

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Until next time,

{theEye}

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{MUSIC MINUTE} Orkestra Obselete’s “Blue Monday 1933”

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Its official. It has been 33 years since the release of New Order’s iconic New Wave classic “Blue Monday”, and just the other day this incredible rendition by Orkestra Obselete brought the 80s jam to life using obsolete instruments from the 1930s!

On top of their wildly original version, we are obsessed with their dark and mysterious presentation which includes black masks, and dim lighting for the perfect secret society vibe!

You know that we are big believers in the {PAST} {PRESENT} and {FUTURE} colliding, and here we have the perfect example of how this magical mixture can really amp up our everyday, and make us see things a little differently!

You can mesh your life with the {PAST} and help shape the {FUTURE} by shopping the {SHOP}! Tons of ingredients to help conjure your unique style spirit, and don’t forget XIXIXI gets you 25% OFF.  Click here to shop now! 

For now enjoy these tunes!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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History {Is Made At Night} – The Poison Apple That Killed The Father of Computer Science

There is no doubt that the world would not be the same place if it hadn’t been for Alan Turing [b. 23 June 1912 – d. 7 June 1954]. In fact, you wouldn’t be reading this delectable morsel if it weren’t for the incredible genius of this British mathematician in developing the modern day computer.

A prophet of mathematics, with a natural inclination to numbers and science, Turing entered King’s College in 1931 and graduated Honors in Mathematics pioneering the working model for the Turing Machine, which operated on “Algorithims” that would make computing any mathematical problem conceivable. Obtaining a PhD from Princeton in June 1938, Turing  furthered his concepts introducing oracles that could plan and solve complex problems that the Turing Machine was unable to compute.

It wasn’t until war time that Turing’s incredible genius would truly be implored, joining the German code-breaking team at Bletchley Park in September 1938. Using his profound wizardry in the realm of numbers, Turing was able to develop a statistical approach using computing machines to decode the impossible German Enigma-codes. This would ultimately provide the Allies with a major advantage in winning the war.

Turing was awarded the Order of the British Empire for his services during wartime.

Turing also applied his mathematical brilliance in the fields of biology, imploring mathematical thought to the idea of pattern formation in nature. He also used mathematics to develop the foundations for the science behind morphogenesis – how biological forms come to be.

So in short, a {Hero}.

However, although interesting, it’s not his mathematic, scientific, or civil achievements that really caught our attention. It is, in fact, his mysterious and bizarre death.

It all began quite innocently – the way these things always begin. After being victim to a petty burglary of his home in January of 1952, police investigations opened the flood gates, revealing Turing’s homosexuality, which in fact was illegal in the UK at this point. Wanting to evade going to prison, Turing was able to go on probation after agreeing to a chemical castration that would require him to take injects of stilboestrol, a synthetic estrogen hormone.

Perhaps the injects caused moments of weakness or uncertainty, as various mood disorders and physical ailments have now been attributed to stilboestrol. And while he is recorded as throwing “such a jolly [tea] party” for a neighbour and her son four days before he died, he was found in the most macabre of circumstances: laying in bed with a half-eaten apple at his side.

If this sounds like fairy tale, don’t be mistaken, the past is a twisted and dark place, but there’s no denying the comparison to Turing’s death and the story of Snow White and The Seven Dwarves – Turing’s recorded favourite fairy tale. Novelist David Leavitt quotes that the mathematical genius took “an especially keen pleasure in the scene where the Wicked Queen immerses her apple in the poisonous brew.”

Many have speculated that Turing may have soaked the apple in poison as an homage to his favorite tale of dark pleasure and deceit, others (his mother particularly) have asserted that Turing was in fact just careless when it came to storing his lab chemicals. Whatever the truth may be, the circumstances surrounding Turing’s untimely demise are as fascinating as his science. His death was ruled a suicide, but recent discoveries seem to point in other directions.

Perhaps it was just a way to say good-bye to a cruel world, unwilling to accept the man, no matter how great his genius. He was but the innocent, and it was a truly unjust society that would poison the likes of such an incredible mind.

Luckily, Turing’s legacy lives on every we look. From this computer screen, to our televisions, and phones, the airplanes in the sky, the subway beneath my feet – all these things and more would not be possible without Turing’s ingenuity and courage to innovate.

Can we say ‘Hello 21st Century’!

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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David Jones and The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Long-Haired Men

Young David Bowie- Hunky Dory- Long Hair

Before he was Ziggy Stardust, before he was even David Bowie – there was David Jones, a long-haired boy with big dreams and a soaring sense of the world around him.

We found this really cool clip of the young David Jones being interviewed on the BBC at only 17 discussing his foundation: The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Long-Haired Men.

Ultimately, I feel like this clip goes to show that you don’t become a rebel, you are just born one.

It’s all got to stop! They’ve had enough! The worms are turning. The rebellion of the long hairs is on it’s way!

Long Haired David Bowie

My, how things have changed! Or have they?

What’s your take on the perception of men who have long hair?!

Let us know in the comments below!

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 Until next time,

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