Tag Archives: win

Emanuelle Riva, Mon Amour . . .

Emanuelle Riva Goes Crazy in Amour Film 2012 Michael Haneke

85-year old French movie star Emanuelle Riva, star of this year’s unapologetic future classic “Amour“, is already making history as the oldest Actress to be nominated in her category at this year’s Academy Awards, and might just be going on to make history again if she wins- making her the oldest Actress to win the Best Actress trophy ever (beating Jessica Tandy’s record back in 1990 for the film “Driving Miss Daisy” at the age of 81).

And with a surprise win at this year’s BAFTA Award (just ask David O’Russell), Ms. Riva might just be on her way to that podium to accept for this year’s Academy Awards, set for February 24. In reaction to her nomination, Riva said:

Emanuelle Riva and Jean Louis Trintignant, 2012

“I am truly happy, touched, and honored to receive, today in New York, a nomination for the role of Anne in AMOUR by Michael Haneke. For me,  it is an immense gift, at this stage of my life, to be chosen by my sisters and brothers, for what I do as an actress. I never thought,  while working throughout the years in Europe and France, that one day, i would cross the Atlantic Ocean, come to the United States, and be nominated. It is quite surreal for me.  Shooting AMOUR with Michael Haneke was a complete joy for me, as I felt an absolute trust in him and we were in complete synch. Michael is the very music of his own film.”

[Awards Daily]

The film is nominated for 5 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Style enthusiasts will be excited to see what Ms. Riva busts onto the red carpet come the big night. But, just because of her age, don’t count her out on making an impression. She is French, after all.

But on top of that, she is a star that has been working in the industry overseas for decades upon decades.

Amour 2012 Stars Emanuelle Riva and Jean Louis Trintignant

Hiroshima mon amour

HiroshimaMonAmour

Leave it to the Academy to wait until one of the most talented actresses there has ever been is 85 years old to garner a nomination. One of the first films that ever made a real impact on my style, and on my creative outlook was the 1959 art-house film classic, “Hiroshima, Mon Amour“, which aptly starred the beautiful blonde French bombshell (indeed, she was!).

The film was directed my Alain Resnais (“The Last Year At Marienbad“), and written by the novelist Margeurite Duras, in one of the most incredibly poetic screenplays ever written.

Emanulle Riva Goes A Little Crazy

Emanuelle Riva and Eji okada in Hiroshima Mon Amour

Emanuelle Riva Sexy in Hiroshima Mon Amour 1959 film

The film is fascinating as it travels in and out of the streets of Hiroshima, shot after the tragedy of the Atom bomb.

The film explores an interracial romance between Emanuelle Riva, a French Actress filming a war picture and her romance with the brilliantly handsome Eji Okada, and the culture clash that surrounds them in the beautiful ruins of the sad Japanese landmark.

The film is groundbreaking for the two as Eji Okada is given an almost European sophistication, not to mention a major dose of sex-appeal (something Asian men were not given in films at this time), and Emanuelle Riva bravely explores a plethora of conditions and situations as her character explores her past.

Emanuelle Riva shows off some major chops in this film – showing a range that could only be described as Award-worthy.

Sadly, the Academy was not up to snuff with their foreign film actresses, so it’s great today to see that so many talents from around the world are accepted into the limelight of fame and stardom no matter their age or race – what matters most is talent. And by gosh, does Emanuelle Riva have that!

Emanuelle Riva - Hiroshima Mon Amour Still

She is an actress that deserves to be recognized, and whose beauty we are lucky to have been captured on film over sixty years ago . Granted, she is very beautiful still, even at 85 years of age, but it’s really great to glimpse the actress in her younger years, watching her take big risks and break huge grounds. If it weren’t for her risky performances in the past, there probably wouldn’t even be the possibility of the range we see now for female actors in the industry.

Amour 2012- screen shots - EMANUELLE RIVA and Jean Louis Trintignant

Beauty can be summed up in many ways, but most importantly, it is this attitude of unwillingness to coincide with the expectations of the norms that is the most beautiful aspect of any human being there can be.

Fingers crossed for Emanulle Riva come the big night (if not her, we’d love to see little Quevenzhane Wallis take the prize!).

Until next time!

Emanuelle Riva, Mon Amour . . . 

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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Fancy and Folly: Giving Me The Silent Treatment

When I first saw the trailers for “The Artist“, shortly after it’s premier at the Cannes Film Festival that would lead to Jean Dujardin’s Best Actor win at the prestigious art festival, I was not impressed. Silly folly, I thought. Reductive (Thanks, Madonna). Wasted Inspiration. How could this “NEW” silent film set in th 20s really make a splash? There was no way, in my mind, that the audiences of 2011 would really appreciate the novelty…but surprisingly, they did!

Don’t know what it is about this one (as I’m still stubbornly NOT seeing it) that really taps a chord with everyone these days, but one thing is certain we have a hit on our hands! Picking up seven wins at the British Academy Awards last night, the film is continuing it’s unbeatable winning streak all the way to the Oscars.

Granted, the recreation of the 1920s looks great (especially costumes by first-time Academy Award nominee Mark Bridges, who painstakingly recreated designs from the 20s), not to mention Du Jardin’s charisma and winning smile, but there seems to be something so defeatist about watching a silent film made in 2012.

Why do I need to see this? I have seen many silent films, some of which are the most impressive pieces of film making, or dare I say ART, I’ve ever seen: “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” (1920), “Birth of a Nation”(1915) , “Intolerance”(1916), “The Gold Rush”(1925), “Metropolis”(1927), “Voyage to the Moon” (1902), and “Pandora’s Box” (1929) are all some of the most important films ever made, as well as full of some of the most visually arresting images of all time.

 

All these films were made before sound became an unstoppable force in making movies. Before this time, the power of image and word, and the novelty of the moving image was enough to begin a revolution that would become Hollywood. And don’t think that because these films were made without sound that they are PG fair, because most silent classics are full of adultery, scandal, ghosts, vampires, drugs, sex, violence, and witches- all the things we love at The Eye of Faith, minus the rock n’ roll!

Watching the films of that time are magical in itself, as it’s probablly the closest any of us could ever get to time travel in our lifetime. It’s fascinating getting lost in Louise Miller’s beautiful bow lips, or catching Valentino’s devilish gaze- these celluloid dreams are the closest thing we have to these faded idols of yesteryear and their long lonst lost time. Having been made on film, we are getting a literal imprint of a moment in time playing out before our eyes. Absolute magic!

Back in those days, they didn’t have any of the technology we have today to make movies- all you had was a team full of people and a whole lot of passion to try to tell your story. Even “The Artist” couldn’t escape from having the shoot the film first in Colour, to then digitally manipulate the film to the lauded black and white photogrpahy being praised today.

Back in the 1920s, there is no way they would have shot a film only to have to redo it completely somewhere else; if time meant money now, time really meant money in those days- but today in 2012, I’m afraid that time for these jewels only means edging closer and closer to obscurity.

Ultimately, it’s about love for movies in general. I cannot fault director Michel Hazanavicius’ vision, bringing his ode to Silent Era to the masses, and hopefully with it’s growing popularity the film can also bring some love to the real classics of the 1910s and 1920s. However, I can’t help but think “The Artist” may even further dampened our view of the true days of Hollywood Babylon. Reductive.

Many people, like myself, see all the promos for “The Artist” and can’t see past the gimmick of it all. (I mean, REALLY?!!) Hopefully this doesn’t taint the idea of watching a real classic- seeing as you can watch a “NEW” one. Or maybe I’m being much too cynical and everything is jolly! It’s great to see so much love for the past, in general though. Perhaps simply, the time of nostalgia has really struck.

Throughout the years, silent films have provided an endless source of inspiration. Luckily, many silent films are being restored and archived so future generations can enjoy the magic of the past. Watching a silent film, you can almost feel lucky, as if somehow you have found a hidden doorway to the past, and luckily you can stay there (at least for an hour or two).

Lest we forget from whence we came, and enjoy a piece of the puzzle today!

We’ve included a scene from 1928’s “The Laughing Man” (a precursor to Batman’s iconic villain The Joker) for your viewing pleasure.

[And if you have a lot of time on your hand OpenFlix on Youtube has a ton of Full Length classic films for Free including the 1922 Swedish Documentary HAXAN on the History of Witchcraft!!! Silent and Spooky. Click Here.]

Now you have a good trajectory. So, have fun!!!

[PORTLANDIA:SEASON 2]

 

Sincerely,
{theEye}

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Flashback Monday: Wigan Casino

Here’s another one from the vault! We love taking our ticking time machine on Mondays for great stuff like this. The scene: Wigan Casino, and what everyone had on the brain was Northern Soul (a movement sweeping across the UK)! Check out those moves, and above all, that style.

Enjoy,
{the Eye}

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