Tag Archives: Manly

E.O.F. SNAPSHOT OF THE DAY {MAY 21, 2013}

gentlemen21
{Put on those suits and ties and its back to the races.}
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{The Eye of Faith}
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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day { May 14, 2013 }

EOF Snapshot - May 14, 2013

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MUSIC MINUTE: “Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor {Op. 30}”, Rachmaninoff Plays Rachmaninoff

Rachmaninov or Rachmaninoff - Either Way He Looks Great in a Hat

Sergei Rachmaninoff - Young

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“Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music.”

-Sergei Rachmaninoff

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Sergei_Rachmaninoff,_1899

Whether you spell it Rachmaninoff or Rachmaninov, Sergei Rachmaninoff was a man of undoubted personal style.

Sergei Rachmaninoff Black and White Portrait

A subtle style. But a sure of himself style. It’s the kind of style you could expect from the man who created some of the most complex, dark, and demanding music ever created (Anyone who saw “Shine” knows what I mean . . .).

noah

Cecil Parkes: Rachmaninov? Are you sure?

David: Kind of. I’m not really sure about anything.

Cecil Parkes: The Rach 3. It’s monumental.

David: It’s a mountain. The hardest piece you could everest play.

SHINE (1996)

noah cross as david helfgott in SHINE (1996) plays rachmaninoff

In fact, this is the song that makes the then not crazy, brilliant Australian piano protege David Helfgott (played by Noah Cross), literally go crazy, to emerge as a still brilliant, but crazy,  Australian piano protege

So if that’s any sign, be sure to imagine this man’s mastery as you listen to him play his own composition – the dangerously, beautifully romantic, mysterious, and powerful piece, “Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor {Op. 30}“.

Sergei_Rachmaninoff,_1910s

Sergei+Rachmaninoff

One of the greatest pianists there ever was, he was also known to have an uncanny memory, and with a set of extra large hands (Marfan Syndrome), he was able to maneuver some of the most complex and challenging chordal configurations.

He managed to escape the Russian Revolution, and even recorded with Thomas Edison in the earliest days of record making, creating recordings for Edison’s phonograph.

He eventually died just four days before his 70th birthday in Beverly Hills, California.

Portrait-rachmaninov_peinture

Sergei_Rachmaninoffvintage style

With style comes great taste. One of the benefits of great taste, is that you can enjoy music like this. . .

This is one of his most provocative and moving pieces he ever wrote, and with the help of today’s technology, we can listen to a recording of the man himself, Sergei Rachmaninoff, performing his own, legendary masterwork.

And, maybe one day you will create a masterpiece like this one.

Or maybe you already have? That’s for you to decide.

Young rebel- Sergei Rachmaninoff- Vintage Style Idol- The Eye of Faith

Rebel Spirit? That’s for sure.

Until next time,

{theEye}

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Hamming It Up With Hitchcock! Hopkins Plays the Hitch in new film “Hitchcock”

So the trailer is out for Fox Searchlight‘s latest cinematic craving “Hitchcock“; a biopic starring Anthony Hopkins as the famed director during his trials and tribulations during the makings of his iconic film, “Psycho“.

The film features a roster of talent that include Jessica Biel as actress Vera Miles, Scarlett Johansson as the lead with the bad deed, Janet Leigh, Toni Collette as dedicated production assistant Peggy Robertson, and Helen Mirren as his loving and loyal partner-in-crime Alma Reville.

Set for release on November 23, expect the master of suspense to inspire and influence us all once again! From the looks of the trailer, this Hitchcock shows great panache when it comes to business, a savvy for story telling, and a committed loving and working relationship with his wife, Alma.


“Suspense is like a woman. The more room she leaves to the imagination, the greater the emotion and the expectation. The audience is much more frightened by what it imagines than by what it actually sees. There’s nothing terrifying about an explosion, only the expectation of it.”

-Alfred Hitchcock to Bernard Parkin

It was around the time of “Psycho“‘s release that the British born director began garnering notice for his unique artistic contribution to popular culture and the cinema. The french in particular took a special admiration for the director, who they formidably christened a grand auteur of the medium – a worthy honor (they don’t take that term lightly, en France).

Indeed, his films inhabit a very special singular world, one which can only be simplified to a single term: Hitchcock.

The settings of his stories become a collage of reality, dreaming, and desire. The inhabitants are as stylized and edited as the story lines – always modern and even hip; the heroes are all dashing, the man Hitchcock idolized for himself, and the heroines typically blonde with assets.

They all play pawns in a wicked game of cat and mouse meticulously planned and drafted by Hitchcock and his wife, Alma, script supervisor and Hitchcock’s private second set of eyes (it was her who noticed Janet Leigh swallowing after her death scene which would later have to be altered from the negative).

When actors asked their motivation for a scene, he simply stated “Your salary”. If they couldn’t push to the emotional degree he needed for the scene, he said “Fake it”. And when asked if he felt actors were cattle, he quickly corrected that he only felt they should be “treated” as such.

While Hitchcock never won a coveted Best Director statuette at the Academy Awards, he did receive the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award from the Academy for his contributions to the industry.

It was an impressive career lasting from the early 1920s up to his last film in 1976, “Family Plot“.

There’s no denying the influence the man has had on popular culture. Many suggest there wouldn’t have been a James Bond if it weren’t for “North by Northwest” kicking off the action genre the way he it did. Others cite Hitchcock for his innovation in the medium, always adapting and quickly changing with the times.

Designers such as Alexander McQueen have cited Hitchcock’s influence, and with “Hitchcock” kick starting you can expect to see more and more of the master’s presence come into play.  Best thing is, both men and women can easily cite these films for alluring, modern, and sophisticated looks that will have everyone saying “WHOA”.

And for as dark or complex his story lines took him, he was always able to hold on to his enviable sense of humor. From his various walk-on parts in every film, to the character he invented of himself – Hitchcock was a wildly entertaining individual drenched in that very dry, very British sense of humor.

Hopefully “Hitchcock” hits the nail on the head with his one, but with such a talented cast and crew, and the impeccably talented Sir Anthony Hopkins at the wheel, there’s no doubt in my mind this film will continue to pave the legacy that we can simply sum up as his very own.

We picked out some of our favorite photos of the Hitch hamming it up for the camera to get those creative juices flowing, and to show the softer, sillier side of this irreverent genius.

For more Hitchcock style, we recommend “Hitchcock Style” by Jean-Pierre Dufreigne. A fantastically illustrated book from Assouline, full of insight into the sum of the parts that make for the iconic Hitchcock look. Check it out!

Thanks for reading, everyone!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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<<Check out the British Film Institute’s Ode to Hitchcock>>

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {June 8, 2012}

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E.O.F. Style Divinity : Neile Adams AKA {WOMAN FROM THE SOUTH}

Ruby Neilam Salvador “Neile” Adams (born July 10, 1932) is a Filipino actress, singer and dancer who made more than twenty appearances in films and television series between 1952 and 1991. Most notably famous for being the first wife of iconic and enigmatic star, Steve McQueen, being married to the man from 1956-1972.

Neile was born in Manila, in the Philippines July 10, 1932 . Her mother, Carmen Salvador, was of German, Spanish, and Filipino descent, and her father was of English, Chinese, and Filipino ancestry. Her mother, a dancer, was the sister of basketball player and actor Lou Salvador. She was a girl on an island with star’s in her eyes, and the world was her oyster.

But the Japanese invaded Pearl Harbor and all Hell broke loose in Manila.  Japanese occupation began and Neile and her mother were taken prisoner and were put in a concentration camp on the grounds of Santo Tomas University where they would spend three terrifying years.
Liberated by America, Neiles family would find freedom in the United States, she’d enrol at the Katherine Dunham School of Dance.  With a prize scholarship and exotic beauty, Neile Adams could feel her dreams waiting for her around the corner.  She became a model for crime and detective magazines (which Steve McQueen would modestly do around the same time, the pair never meeting at these shoots).  It was a decent way to make money but embarrassed her mother and she quit speaking to her.

She’d bump into a young, blonde actor around restaurants, but the two didn’t formally meet until Neile was on a date with actor/producer Mark Rydell.  McQueen would privately make it known to Rydell that this young exotic gorgeous woman, Neile, was going to be his! The two fell madly in love, opening each other’s eyes to new worlds and passion neither had known before.  The two lovers would marry November 2, 1956, only four short months after meeting.

The pair starred in a memorable episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents  television series in 1960 called “Man from the South” based on a short story by Roald Dahl.  Though Neile’s charisma and clear star potential always shines through in any scene, it was her husband who insisted his wife give up her day job on stage and film, and take on the full-time duties of being a housewife.  Without hesitation, the young budding starlet succumbed to her man’s ego and a custom of the times,  and gave up on her own dreams of stardom and used her own already established Hollywood connections to help Steve McQueen’s acting career get off the ground, and thrive.  For years, as his career failed to ignite, he leeched off the successful dancer’s money — spending her earnings on new cars, drugs and other women.

When he landed a small role in the film of Harold Robbins’s trashy novel, “Never Love A Stranger”, only days passed before he embarked on an intensely sexual affair with the film’s leading lady actress Lita Milan — and then proudly told his wife about it.  According to Neile: ‘Lita would be the first in a long line of flings that would plague me throughout our married life. OK, I thought, I can handle it — I have to — as long as he doesn’t flaunt it.’

Full of inadequacy and doubt, the young dancer settled into a life of staying home to raise her two children with McQueen, and evenings of seclusion, boiling up high grade Peyote Steve would by from the Navajo Indian, while Steve would disappear getting stoned off cocaine, LSD, amongst other experimental drugs with his abundance of Hollywood-hanger-ons.

McQueens philandering ways would prove to save his life on one fateful day.  He was invited to a party at Sharon Tate’s house on the afternoon of August 7, 1969, which he had every intention of attending, until a phone call from a blonde mistress of his at the time distracted him from the festivities.  He barely avoided the Charles Manson Massacre, where Sharon Tate, amongst others he knew well and others he never knew where all savagely murdered.

The constant betrayals and drug fuelled arguments would prove to be more devastating for the once infectiously loving couple.  Neile Adams could no longer live within a tumultuous marriage and a life of disillusioned success.  After incidents of adultery accusations, loaded gun death threats and an escalating abusive marriage she would be the one to file for divorce and the two would be divorced by 1972.   Neile remained to be one of McQueens closest confidantes until he would pass away from lung cancer in 1980.


“My life and times with Steve had spanned twenty-four years. More than half my life at the time of his death. They were over now. Gone. Finished.

That he loved me and that I had been the most important person in his life, I have no doubt.  That I loved him and that he had been the most influential person in mine cannot be denied.

Good-bye, my friend. You are missed. It sure was one hell of a ride.”
Neile Adams. 

Neile would go on to find another love for herself.  She met Alvin Toffel at a luncheon for her friend, Princess Grace of Monaco. He was as interesting a man as he was handsome and confident enough to live with and support Neile’s memories of the iconic Steve McQueen. He was an air force fighter pilot  and an engineer with the Gemini and Apollo Space programs. He and Neile married on January 19, 1980 and would remain husband and wife for the rest of his life when he passed in 2005.

Neile has written an in depth and honest perspective about her life and marriage to McQueen in her Memoirs, My Husband My Friend. She also offers many commentaries in various Steve McQueen specials, always honouring the memory of her late and beloved husband.   We wanted to take some time to honour and appreciate Neile herself who lived through so much and still shines bright like a true star.

{The Eye}

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Wallis and Edward, “W.E.” . . . Whatever?!

So the reviews have not been so pretty thus far for Madonna’s W.E.

Vogue Italia’s Emanuele Lugli posted a rather scathing review after the film’s premier at the Venice Film Festival in November, and hasn’t garned very much acclaim since (unfortunately) for Madonna as the next great auteur.

This is unfair since Madonna has definitely generated herself as a leader in style, and the art of catching our eye with generations of videos and unique fashions, so it’s easy to see where her interest in the subject lies.

Wallis Simpson was already a divorced American socialite who was subsequently married when the two crossed paths in 1930 at his home, Fort Belvedere in Windsor Great Park, where the Prince often entertained parties and a series of scandalous affairs. It would be almost a year after abdicating his throne before Wallis was officially divorced from her husband, and the two could finally be wed.


Talk about romantic. They quickly became the toast of cafe society around Europe with Wallis gracing the pages of Vogue, with an affinity for French couture including Christian Dior, Hubert de Givenchy, and most especially Madame Vionnet. Equally, Edward VIII had garnered quite a reputation for his outlandish Dandy lifestyle which had quickly fallen out of fashion after the Great War.

Nevertheless, a Dandy must do as a dandy does; with a long lineage of “Dandy-ism” in the family (stemming back to King George IV, legion for the British Regency, and best friends with Numero Uno Dandy Supremo, Beau Brummell) it seemed only natural for the handsome Prince to exploit his God-Given sensibilities.

This he did with thick Windsor knotted neckties, and various combinations of checks, plaids, tweeds, and stripes that would mark Edward VIII as the epitome of manly elegance. He enjoyed his “pants from across the sea”, trousers done in an American high-rise cut, and had matching jackets tailored in London, creating a new hybrid of classic style with an ifusion of American conservatism and British sophistication.

He was J.C. Leyendecker’s Arrow Collar Man personified, and Vogue’s editor-in-chief Diane Vreeland would describe the nonchalant elegance of the Duke as “Chic Fatigue”.All we know is, we’re not getting tired, we haven’t even gotten started!

Also worth mentioning is the Duke and Duchess’ controversial relationship with Hilter, and the Nazi party. Many history books portray the couple as sincere Nazi sympathizers, and this the most would continually taint the pair’s reputation.

And while Wallis recieved much attention for her bold, architectural fashion choices, critics often pointed to how plain a woman she was, and rumors quickly spread of her years in Shandhai and Peking where she recieved extensive training in the erotic arts.

Most recently it has been revealed that the Duke of Windsor had been a patient of psychiatrist Alexander Cannon, known as the “Yogi of Yorkshire”. Cannon was an expert occultist claiming to have levitated a chasm in Nepal, and administered exotic remedies for problems ranging from anxiety, to sex and confidence. Edward VIII was seeing the eccentric doctor for a “drinking problem”, and the two were becoming increasingly close, to the point others described Cannon as the King’s closest confidante (other than Simpson). Most interesting, no?

The tale of Wallis and Edward is full of as much controversy and ridicule as Madonna’s film it seems. Whatever their politics, it’s impossible to discredit the deep love the two obviously share for one another, and to abdicate the throne, be a martyr for love- it’s literally the stuff movies are made of, and I’ll give Madonna that for sinking her claws into such a juicy mother.

My hat goes off to Arianne Phillips and her spot on costume designs for the film. Phillips, who recieved an Academy Award Nomination for “Walk the Line” (2005), and was responsible for the tailored looks of Tom Ford’s “A Single Man” (2009), as well as taking care of Madonna’s costumes for both “The Confessions”, and the “Sticky & Sweet” tours, does an amazing job at recreating the glamour and decadence of the famous couple.

Photographs by Tom Munro for Vanity Fair, Quite Continental has featured a great interview with the designer and her many challenges dressing the film.

Her dynamic work include several recreation of Simpson’s most famous looks, and despite budget restrictions, Phillips’ work comes off as luxe and rich as ever. Most extraordinarily, the sophistication and elegance of Edward is equally imagined and captured, with James D’Arcy doing his best to pull off the Duke’s effortless swag.

The Academy Awards are just around the corner, and though we can safely set Madonna aside for a chance at Best Director, we’re expecting to see another Academy Award Nomination for the film’s exceptional costume designs.

There’s a reason behind the madness people! Madonna knows, she does kaballah…I came across this eloquent quote from Stan Hawkin’s “The British Pop Dandy” for some clarification on perhaps, Edward VIII’s own dandy motto or manifesto he might carry with himself…maybe a certain attitude that could attribute to him, the romantic hero, a true dandy, and Wallis herself, a dandy in her own right. Here goes:

“Someone whose transient tastes never shirk
from excess, protest or rebellion…the dandy
revels in artifice simply for style’s sake as
a mischievous play with masks of calculated
elegance….all the great dandies have been
outsiders…eager to
make themselves publicly visible through a
conceit that is deemed their birthright. Driven
by a desire to draw on a personal style, the
dandy unabashedly states who he is and what he wants
without giving a damn for what anyone cares”

-Stan Hawkins (author, The British Pop Dandy)

Could explain how they always seem to be up to something! Can definitely relate to the “masks of calculated elegance” vibe in regards to the pair. Check out the video below:

Whatever. “W.E.” is making it’s way to a theatre near you January 20. What do you think?
-The Eye


[UPDATE (01/19/2012): Congratulations Arianne Phillips for your Costume Designer Guild nomination for excellence in Period Costuming! ]
The Eye.

[UPDATE: OSCAR GLORY! Congratulations to Arianne Phillips for her 2012 Academy Award Nomination for Excellence in Costume Design!!! (01/24/2012)]

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New York Times Magazine Gives Us A Touch of Evil.

Here at The Eye of Faith, we always have a taste for the sinister, the strange, and the macabre. Seems like some of this year’s most talented and intriguing stars feel the same penchant for the other side of good- EVIL. No need to get worried though, they’re doing it in the most wicked style!

New York Times Magazine always goes the extra mile, and the Touch of Evil collaboration betwen some of the year’s most endearing talents showcases their chops (as well as some amazing cinemtagraphy by Ross Richardson, and on-point direction from Alex Pager) in a glorious collection of wicked supreme! Drawing from the world of film, each actor provides a short journey into the complexities of the different guises they inhabit.

Rooney Mara goes straight for the kill as a Burgess-ingnited sociopath, awakened and on the prowl. Fantastic, as her every blink, and expression (or lack there-of) create the harmonious face of a true-born killer.

Can’t wait to see her in the upcoming ‘Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’, and if this is any insight into the young actress’ talent, her punk-rock Lisbeth should be equally as bold and even more gutsy! Ladies, and gentleman: a star is born.

Speaking of newly formed stars, last year’s newborn Alice of Tim Burton’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’, Mia Wasikowska, is a stinger as the “Homewrecker”. After a subtle and effective turn in this year’s ‘Jane Eyre’ , where she played the shy, sad, modest Jane; it’s nice to see her as the sexy vampy femme fatale who knows what she wants, and how to get it.

Another favourite is newcomer Jessica Chastain. You have to love Jessica Chastain! She has hit it out of the park with an amazing 7 films this year, one of them being our favourite- Terrence Malick’s meditative ‘The Tree of Life’, in which Chastain plays the loving mother of a family growing up in 1950’s Waco, Texas. Chastain plays the film’s matriarch with a moving grace, and exhibits remarkably powerful emotive properties in the face for which she has implored full force in her segment as the frightening “Fire starter”.

It’s amazing how many thoughts, ideas, and feelings seem to rush in and out of her gorgeous alabaster face. Love the hair and glasses too! Even when she’s setting the world on fire, she cannot manage to look less gorgeous. We know you must be tired, but we are looking forward to more!


Truly terrifying is Viola Davis, who made her turn this year as the loving Aibileen in this summer’s hit “The Help”, as a deranged ladybug obsessed healthcare worker (Oh my!). There is not one inch of the sweet and caring Aibileen in this facet of Davis, who’s every move down to the inch just oozes pure evil. That’s one we know we will be dreaming of tonight!

But let’s hear it for the boy! Brad Pitt really does have some class. And by class I mean he’s extremely well rounded and brilliant and handsome and … Anyway, safe to say, he’s not to be beat, and he triumphantly showed off his ingenous talents twice this year; first, as a cunning baseball manager in Bennett Miller’s “Moneyball”, and then a triumphant turn playing against type as a strict, buttoned-up patriarch in Terrence Malick’s “Tree of Life”.

They say things always happen in threes, and cover star Brad Pitt impresses one more time making a killing, and diving straight into the chilling world of Lynch’s cult classic “Eraserhead” in a minute that can only be described as stark raving madness. Transformation, yet again, this man should be proclaimed America’s national treasure.

There are many more supreme turns by some of this year’s most talented performers at the New York Times Magazine website where you can view the entire gallery that features amazing performances from Ryan Gosling, Michael Shannon, George Clooney, Kirsten Dunst, and everyone’s favourite villainess, Glenn Close (Who can forget her unhinged Alex in 1987’s ‘Fatal Attraction’? Not us!), to name a few. So check it out! It’s definitely worth the look!

Gotta love the vintage cool and class! E.O.F. Approved.


Who are your favourite movie villains? Name a few! Favourite vid? Which one? Leave a comment below!
The Eye.

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