Tag Archives: deco

{PHOTOBLAST} My Demon Brother . . .

“Fear not at all; fear neither men nor Fates, nor gods, nor anything. Money fear not, nor laughter of the folk folly, nor any other power in heaven or upon the earth or under the earth. “

[Book of the Law: Chapter 2, Line 53]

Seems like the invocation went well last night.

Our demon brother walks the Earth, tempting the weak at heart and empowering the brave. We wanted to bring this PHOTOBLAST back to the hermetic roots of our wayward journey, and raise the demon brother in us all.

 n. De-mon [dmn] 

1. an evil supernatural being; a devil.

2. A persistently tormenting person, force, or passion.

3. One who is extremely zealous, skillful, or diligent.

4. Genius.


The word ‘demon’ has quite an interesting origin in the realm of man. Before gathering itself as a symbol of supernatural evil, the word came from the Greek , Daemon. The wise Plato invested great interest in these mysterious spirits.  These metaphysical beings, who held a state between God and Mortal were “interpreting and transporting human things to the gods and divine things to men; entreaties and sacrifices from below, and ordinances and requitals from above…”

Plato believed that allotted to every man and woman, a daemon would distribute destinies and wisdom to us all. Call it, a conscience of man. Plato would eventually have charges laid against him for “”corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel.”

“Man tells his aspiration in his God; but in his demon he shows his depth of experience.”

-Margaret Fuller






So, dare not fear your demon brother, my friends, for there is indeed a voice that binds man in the form of the night.  If we are all things at once, infinite, a journey to the dark is a quest to find your heart. For wrestling in the soul of man is a struggle bigger than that of you or I.

There is mythical genius in all of us, and what better way to display your gifts of knowledge than with the very threads you wear.  The struggle is to find pride in your sacred identity, whatever that it may be.  So don’t get mad if you find your own demon brother giving you tips on a star-filled night. He might just know a thing or two.

Enjoy our musings…

Don’t forget to Shop the {SHOP} .

XIXIXI gets you 25 % Off at the Checkout

Message me if you need clarification.

Others know.

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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{MUSIC MINUTE} “I’m Doing What I’m Doing For Love” – Teddy Kline and His Orchestra ft. The Two Jazzers

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{1920s German Magazine Cover Illustration}

Been in the 1920s German Weimar Dirty Decadence kind-of-mood lately and can’t shake it!

Found this gem last night, and wanted to share it on the site. It’s been a while since we had a good old fashioned {MUSIC MINUTE} (granted our last {STYLE WISE} was also a {MUSIC MINUTE}) –  but here’s another gem for your listening pleasure.

otto-dix.1241163645

{Sublime & Disturbing – Otto Dix}

It’s called “I’m Doing What I’m Doing for Love” by Teddy Kline and His Orchestra ft. The Two Jazzers. Especially with the release of this year’s “The Great Gatsby” (was that good? I can’t decide), I expect to see more and more of the 1920s seep into our everyday so be warned! Best get into the mood with a mean hot jazz tune like this one which beats the shit out of any of the jazz mixes in “The Great Gatsby” soundtrack.

I wish it had been more like the Mia Farrow/Robert Redford version, but that’s a whole other post . . . the point is, I began to realize a song like this would have been the same kind of hit pop tune that today we’d be all into for a month and then move on to the next . . .

Hoping this helps it from being forgotten! And I’m going to find more cool stuff like this to share in the {FUTURE}

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 Until next time…

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A lot of great things are disappearing each day.  . .
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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {July 2, 2013}

E.O.F. Snapshot- July 2, 2013 - Desmond's Downtown Store- Vintage- The Eye of Faith

 

{ Desmond’s Down Town Store [circa 1928] }

Summer loving, having a blast? Lots of future fun to be had in the {SHOP} !

What are you thinking?

Let us know in the comments section below. . .

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{style-wise} Gatsby Le Magnificent . . .

THE GREAT GATSBY

the grea gatsby - robert redfrod - bathing suit

We thought it would be cool to refresh all our memories with some of the classic looks from the iconic 1974 film that won an Academy Award for Costume Design by the legendary Theoni V. Alredge, whose costumes are some of the finest ever seen in a film to this day.

Robert Redford - The Great Gatsby Tuxedo- 1974- vintage

The film starred Mia Farrow as the delicate Daisy, and a young, handsome, Robert Redford as Gatsby. The looks in this film were a revelation for the time, and continue to inspire to this day.

GQ The Great Gatsby 1974 Cover

And while we can’t wait to see Leo’s take, we were feeling particularly nostalgic for arguably Robert Redford’s most important and iconic roles. We showed you The Brooks Brothers collection which collaborated with costume designer Catherine Martin bring the Gatsby look to life for their stores, and give historical flair to the costumes of the film, but we wanted to delve into the past, and see how much Theoni V. Aldredge’s classic 1974 take permeates these characters still today.

It’s really a testament to classic style and its innate time travelling properties.

Also with Miucci Prada’s contributions to this latest film, who knows which one will be on top of the style castle by the end of it. . .

The role is bound to be another iconic one for Dicaprio. I guess we will have to wait and see which is your favourite –

 Past or Present?

There’s something about a little nostalgia that gets us here. Go figure, right?

Don’t forget to check out the {SHOP} for some dandy decadence of your own!

Until we meet again,

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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EOF- Happy Valentines Day- 2013- Vintage Black and White Postcard - 1920s

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Le Coup de Foudre

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Fancy and Folly: Giving Me The Silent Treatment

When I first saw the trailers for “The Artist“, shortly after it’s premier at the Cannes Film Festival that would lead to Jean Dujardin’s Best Actor win at the prestigious art festival, I was not impressed. Silly folly, I thought. Reductive (Thanks, Madonna). Wasted Inspiration. How could this “NEW” silent film set in th 20s really make a splash? There was no way, in my mind, that the audiences of 2011 would really appreciate the novelty…but surprisingly, they did!

Don’t know what it is about this one (as I’m still stubbornly NOT seeing it) that really taps a chord with everyone these days, but one thing is certain we have a hit on our hands! Picking up seven wins at the British Academy Awards last night, the film is continuing it’s unbeatable winning streak all the way to the Oscars.

Granted, the recreation of the 1920s looks great (especially costumes by first-time Academy Award nominee Mark Bridges, who painstakingly recreated designs from the 20s), not to mention Du Jardin’s charisma and winning smile, but there seems to be something so defeatist about watching a silent film made in 2012.

Why do I need to see this? I have seen many silent films, some of which are the most impressive pieces of film making, or dare I say ART, I’ve ever seen: “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” (1920), “Birth of a Nation”(1915) , “Intolerance”(1916), “The Gold Rush”(1925), “Metropolis”(1927), “Voyage to the Moon” (1902), and “Pandora’s Box” (1929) are all some of the most important films ever made, as well as full of some of the most visually arresting images of all time.

 

All these films were made before sound became an unstoppable force in making movies. Before this time, the power of image and word, and the novelty of the moving image was enough to begin a revolution that would become Hollywood. And don’t think that because these films were made without sound that they are PG fair, because most silent classics are full of adultery, scandal, ghosts, vampires, drugs, sex, violence, and witches- all the things we love at The Eye of Faith, minus the rock n’ roll!

Watching the films of that time are magical in itself, as it’s probablly the closest any of us could ever get to time travel in our lifetime. It’s fascinating getting lost in Louise Miller’s beautiful bow lips, or catching Valentino’s devilish gaze- these celluloid dreams are the closest thing we have to these faded idols of yesteryear and their long lonst lost time. Having been made on film, we are getting a literal imprint of a moment in time playing out before our eyes. Absolute magic!

Back in those days, they didn’t have any of the technology we have today to make movies- all you had was a team full of people and a whole lot of passion to try to tell your story. Even “The Artist” couldn’t escape from having the shoot the film first in Colour, to then digitally manipulate the film to the lauded black and white photogrpahy being praised today.

Back in the 1920s, there is no way they would have shot a film only to have to redo it completely somewhere else; if time meant money now, time really meant money in those days- but today in 2012, I’m afraid that time for these jewels only means edging closer and closer to obscurity.

Ultimately, it’s about love for movies in general. I cannot fault director Michel Hazanavicius’ vision, bringing his ode to Silent Era to the masses, and hopefully with it’s growing popularity the film can also bring some love to the real classics of the 1910s and 1920s. However, I can’t help but think “The Artist” may even further dampened our view of the true days of Hollywood Babylon. Reductive.

Many people, like myself, see all the promos for “The Artist” and can’t see past the gimmick of it all. (I mean, REALLY?!!) Hopefully this doesn’t taint the idea of watching a real classic- seeing as you can watch a “NEW” one. Or maybe I’m being much too cynical and everything is jolly! It’s great to see so much love for the past, in general though. Perhaps simply, the time of nostalgia has really struck.

Throughout the years, silent films have provided an endless source of inspiration. Luckily, many silent films are being restored and archived so future generations can enjoy the magic of the past. Watching a silent film, you can almost feel lucky, as if somehow you have found a hidden doorway to the past, and luckily you can stay there (at least for an hour or two).

Lest we forget from whence we came, and enjoy a piece of the puzzle today!

We’ve included a scene from 1928’s “The Laughing Man” (a precursor to Batman’s iconic villain The Joker) for your viewing pleasure.

[And if you have a lot of time on your hand OpenFlix on Youtube has a ton of Full Length classic films for Free including the 1922 Swedish Documentary HAXAN on the History of Witchcraft!!! Silent and Spooky. Click Here.]

Now you have a good trajectory. So, have fun!!!

[PORTLANDIA:SEASON 2]

 

Sincerely,
{theEye}

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