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E.O.F. STYLE IDOL: Peter Beard {Into the Wild}

Peter Beard in Francis Bacon's Mirror

HALF BYRON / HALF TARZAN

– Bob  Colacello on Beard in “Holy Terror”

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{b, 1938}

Who wouldn’t want to be Peter Beard ?

The “wayward wasp” from New York City was born to wealth, coming from an aristocratic family (his great grandfather founded the Great Northern Railway in 1857; his grandfather, Pierre Lorillard III, a tobacco heir) – he could have had any life he could dream of.

So, after graduating from Yale with a degree in art history (mentored by art greats Josef Albers, Vincent Scully, and Richard Lindner), and a membership with the Scroll & Key (secret society bro), he chose to escape the jungles of the western world for the true wild of Africa.

Peter-Beard-

I like to hang on to things and see the sea changes, the wear and tear, the spills, rain, and fire- how time works on everything.

-Peter Beard

There he would kick off his fantastic art career with a book entitled “The End of the Game” which documented the degradation of African wildlife brought on by yours truly – mankind. Taken in Tsavo National Park in Kenya, unsettling photos of carcasses and bones and rotting corpses in stunning and timeless sepia tinted black and white photos with mixed media and collage would put a stamp on Peter Beard’s exotic, original, and in-your-face style of photography.

It’s no easy feet trenching through crocodile infested waters, or watching as a colleague is torn in half by a charging rhinoceros, but it didn’t stop him from calling Kenya home.

He would set up home and shop in a rural sanctuary known as Hog Ranch, where he entertained a multitude of the world’s most interesting and fabulous friends, and take some of fashion’s most stunning images. He did it all in the most elegant and cool of ways.

Set against raving African landscapes, Beard brings new life to an industry built on a fantasy of luxury and excess, and strips it down (as well as his models) to the subtle supple curves of a woman, for whom he has had many. . . flecks of paint, and wicked swirls collaborate upon the images to create a magic that is evocative of his timeless and raw sense of style and unique perspective on life.

A rockstar in ever right, find him alongside Mick Jagger on tour, yachting with Aristotle and Jackie Onasis (clocking 4:20 in a $2,000 bet he couldn’t stay underwater for 4 minutes), entertaining royals, taking a nap with Francis Bacon in Andy Warhol’s bed,  or partying with Halston at Studio 54, running from bulls in Madrid,  or forcing Janice Dickinson to pose with a cheetah.

Lets put it simply: Peter Beard is a bad ass. He combines classic American ivy league style with a worldly spirit, nostalgia for the golden days of British Colonialism, all jet set to the max – keeping it clean, cool, masculine, and chic, and never being afraid to rip a shirt or get a stain. The truth is, he probably never thinks twice about any of that shit . . .  prolific playboys never give a shit.

EOF STYLE IDOL- Peter Beard- bad Ass

“I’m not a planner; I’ve never made a decision about anything in my life. The good thing about Africa is that you can escape forever. You can do what you want, without someone looking over your shoulder.”

-Peter Beard

You can still find Mr. Beard at Hog Ranch today feeding giraffes, and occasionally entertaining a photo shoot (back in 2009 he shot an iconic set of photographs for the Pirelli Calendar – click here to watch an incredible ‘Making Of’ video of his work on this piece).

His legendary journals and collage work have been soaring in prices at auctions as of late (his 1968 piece Orphan Cheetah Triptych took in $662,500 at Christie’s in 2012), so it would seem that sometimes doing the complete opposite of people’s expectations can truly pay off.

It’s all in the attitude, or should we say spirit. This is one we should all definitely try to invoke.

So, don’t get stuck in the status-quo. And never let anyone tell you that art isn’t worth it.

Peter Beard by Christopher Wahl

“I’m the most irresponsible person you ever met”

– Peter Beard

It changes people, and it changes the world.

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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{ FURTHER READING: VANITY FAIR, NOVEMBER 1996 – “AFRICAN DREAMER” by Leslie Bennetts }

Vintage Surf Style: E.O.F. Remembers Annette Funicello . . .

Annette funicello muscle beach party

This week we were saddened to learn about the passing of 1960s surf film star and legend, Annette Funicello. Before Victoria Justice, Miley Cyrus, and even Britney Spears there was Annette Funicello who epitomized teen stardom throughout the 1950s and 60s.

Growing up in public is especially hard sometimes . . .

-Annette Funicello

annette funicello micky mouse club days

Born October 22, 1942, Annette Funicello is best known as a mouseketeer on “The Mickey Mouse Club”, and rising to teen stardom alongside pal Frankie Avalon (check out “Teen Idol Worship“)in a series of popular beach movies including Beach Party (1963), Muscle Beach Party (1964), Bikini Beach (1964), Pajama Party (1964), Beach Blanket Bingo (1965) and How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965). These films would help create that mythic ideal of that 1960s surf rock beach paradise you are always dreaming of . . .

frankie and annette-tender moments behind the scenes

Funicello and Avalon in Beach Party

annette-1960_vintage summer surf inspiration

The Teen Dream Queen rocked it out in a bikini with a surf board surrounded by musclebound gods to become an icon of the surf lifestyle that the entire globe looked and aspired to. Granted, it was a more wholesome version of real California surf culture, it is still a cornerstone of popular culture to this day.

We love her sexy and sassy looks, and wanted to remember her with a gallery of some of our favourite looks and images of this surf style legend. Annette Funicello passed away at age 70 on April 8, 2013.


annette funicello - teen dream queen

Forever a Star.

Always and Forever,

{theEye}

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Hamming It Up With Hitchcock! Hopkins Plays the Hitch in new film “Hitchcock”

So the trailer is out for Fox Searchlight‘s latest cinematic craving “Hitchcock“; a biopic starring Anthony Hopkins as the famed director during his trials and tribulations during the makings of his iconic film, “Psycho“.

The film features a roster of talent that include Jessica Biel as actress Vera Miles, Scarlett Johansson as the lead with the bad deed, Janet Leigh, Toni Collette as dedicated production assistant Peggy Robertson, and Helen Mirren as his loving and loyal partner-in-crime Alma Reville.

Set for release on November 23, expect the master of suspense to inspire and influence us all once again! From the looks of the trailer, this Hitchcock shows great panache when it comes to business, a savvy for story telling, and a committed loving and working relationship with his wife, Alma.


“Suspense is like a woman. The more room she leaves to the imagination, the greater the emotion and the expectation. The audience is much more frightened by what it imagines than by what it actually sees. There’s nothing terrifying about an explosion, only the expectation of it.”

-Alfred Hitchcock to Bernard Parkin

It was around the time of “Psycho“‘s release that the British born director began garnering notice for his unique artistic contribution to popular culture and the cinema. The french in particular took a special admiration for the director, who they formidably christened a grand auteur of the medium – a worthy honor (they don’t take that term lightly, en France).

Indeed, his films inhabit a very special singular world, one which can only be simplified to a single term: Hitchcock.

The settings of his stories become a collage of reality, dreaming, and desire. The inhabitants are as stylized and edited as the story lines – always modern and even hip; the heroes are all dashing, the man Hitchcock idolized for himself, and the heroines typically blonde with assets.

They all play pawns in a wicked game of cat and mouse meticulously planned and drafted by Hitchcock and his wife, Alma, script supervisor and Hitchcock’s private second set of eyes (it was her who noticed Janet Leigh swallowing after her death scene which would later have to be altered from the negative).

When actors asked their motivation for a scene, he simply stated “Your salary”. If they couldn’t push to the emotional degree he needed for the scene, he said “Fake it”. And when asked if he felt actors were cattle, he quickly corrected that he only felt they should be “treated” as such.

While Hitchcock never won a coveted Best Director statuette at the Academy Awards, he did receive the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award from the Academy for his contributions to the industry.

It was an impressive career lasting from the early 1920s up to his last film in 1976, “Family Plot“.

There’s no denying the influence the man has had on popular culture. Many suggest there wouldn’t have been a James Bond if it weren’t for “North by Northwest” kicking off the action genre the way he it did. Others cite Hitchcock for his innovation in the medium, always adapting and quickly changing with the times.

Designers such as Alexander McQueen have cited Hitchcock’s influence, and with “Hitchcock” kick starting you can expect to see more and more of the master’s presence come into play.  Best thing is, both men and women can easily cite these films for alluring, modern, and sophisticated looks that will have everyone saying “WHOA”.

And for as dark or complex his story lines took him, he was always able to hold on to his enviable sense of humor. From his various walk-on parts in every film, to the character he invented of himself – Hitchcock was a wildly entertaining individual drenched in that very dry, very British sense of humor.

Hopefully “Hitchcock” hits the nail on the head with his one, but with such a talented cast and crew, and the impeccably talented Sir Anthony Hopkins at the wheel, there’s no doubt in my mind this film will continue to pave the legacy that we can simply sum up as his very own.

We picked out some of our favorite photos of the Hitch hamming it up for the camera to get those creative juices flowing, and to show the softer, sillier side of this irreverent genius.

For more Hitchcock style, we recommend “Hitchcock Style” by Jean-Pierre Dufreigne. A fantastically illustrated book from Assouline, full of insight into the sum of the parts that make for the iconic Hitchcock look. Check it out!

Thanks for reading, everyone!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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<<Check out the British Film Institute’s Ode to Hitchcock>>

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“The Last Night of the World” by Ray Bradbury for Esquire Magazine {Feb. 1951}

[photo courtesy of Esquire Magazine]

“What would you do if you knew this was the last night of the world?”

“What would I do; you mean, seriously?”

“Yes, seriously.”

“I don’t know — I hadn’t thought. She turned the handle of the silver coffeepot toward him and placed the two cups in their saucers.

He poured some coffee. In the background, the two small girls were playing blocks on the parlor rug in the light of the green hurricane lamps. There was an easy, clean aroma of brewed coffee in the evening air.

“Well, better start thinking about it,” he said.

“You don’t mean it?” said his wife.

He nodded.

And so begins this tantalizingly provocative and cognitively delicious short story by the great Ray Bradbury. Originally published for Esquire Magazine in the February 1951 edition of the magazine, the story has recently been posted on the magazine’s website in honor of his June 5th passing.

The author wrote 12 stories in total for the magazine; this one in particular, entitled “The Last Night of the World“, couldn’t be more appropriate for our current social climate. Bradbury always had a way with words, and since  early childhood, his works have always inspired and pushed the boundaries of the imagination.

The “Midwest Surrealist” pushed the boundaries of Science Fiction and Fantasy beyond the borders of the genre into the world of timeless classics by referencing mythology in his work:

First of all, I don’t write science fiction. I’ve only done one science fiction book and that’s Fahrenheit 451, based on reality. It was named so to represent the temperature at which paper ignites. Science fiction is a depiction of the real. Fantasy is a depiction of the unreal. So “Martian Chronicles” is not science fiction, it’s fantasy. It couldn’t happen, you see? That’s the reason it’s going to be around a long time — because it’s a Greek myth, and myths have staying power.

[SOURCE]

Some of our all-time favorites works include “The Halloween Tree“, “Something Wicked This Way Comes“, and “The Martian Chronicles“- without either, The Eye of Faith may not have even existed! {Now thats scary!}

We are deeply saddened by the loss of this one-of-a-kind talent, but please enjoy the rest of the story, “The Last Night of the World”, in his honor courtesy of Esquire.

+ RAY BRADBURY {AUGUST 22, 1920 – JUNE 5, 2012} +

Sincerely,

{the Eye}

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