Tag Archives: 1956

STYLE {WISE} : Rebel Noir, and “Crime in the Streets” (1956)

eof style wise - vintage menswear supremo - crime in the streets 1956

This 1956 classic had movie star Sal Mineo playing a street wise gang member just a year after his Oscar nominated turn as a misunderstood teenager in the legendary “Rebel Without a Cause”.

The film also featured a young bad-ass John Cassavetes before he was pawning off Mia Farrow to Satan or directing his own killer films.

The look of the film is, what we like to call, Rebel Noir :

eof style wise - this is how we do it - rebel rebel - crime in the streets 1956

eof style wise- street wise - gang lord style - crime in the streets 1956

eof style wise - call of duty - street gang style - rebel wild - crime in the streets 1956

eof style wise- alley cat blues - classic street gang 1950s vintage menswear - crime in the streets 1956

“Crime in the Streets” promised to tell “the whole story of the Rock’n’Roll generation”, which seemed to be on everybody’s mind. Who were these outcast teens in their washed denim pants, flashy sports coats, and slicked back hair? I’m sure somewhere deep down inside there’s a reason behind the madness.

The film plays better than one might expect, and is definitely a classic of the 1950s street gang film genre. Definitely a must see for real players of vintage style reincarnation. All the time. Anytime.

crime in the streets - 1956 vintage poster colour

Check it out!


We have lots of raw, rare, and special finds for you from The Eye of Faith {Vintage} to relive these moments, among many others, so be sure to check out the {SHOP} ASAP to get your fix.

All the time. Anytime.

{also if you liked “Crime in the Streets”, be sure to check out 1983’s street gang revival, “Rumble Fish”}

Until next time,

{theEye}

+
Like us on Facebook and Follow us on Twitter
+
+
+++
{The Eye of Faith}
+++
+

 

OUT OF THIS WORLD!!! Rare Marlon Brando Screen Test for “Rebel Without a Cause” !

My Man Marlon

Just like our OUT OF THIS WORLD! look back at Buddy Holly goofing off with his friends on Super 8 mm, this is another rare intimate moment with another world-class rebel star.

Actually, before Buddy Holly, and even James Dean himself, Marlon was making a name for himself as a bad boy of the stage and screen. Originating the role of Stanley Kowalski in Tennesse Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire” at just 23, he paved the way for method acting as the preferred style of acting in Hollywood throughout the 1950s with one electrifying performance after another. His appearance in the screen version would also see sales in men’s undershirts rise extraordinarily, making way for the modern T-shirt we are so used to in our everyday. We are looking forward to looking at more of Marlon Brando’s unique stamp on style, but in the meantime wanted to bring to you this lost moment and memory of what might have been. The actual screen test Marlon Brando performed to audition in the role that would change society forever, as the lead in “Rebel Without a Cause” (which, of course, was passed on to new rising star James Dean).

Marlon seems to engross himself in the role, and plays on his good looks and charm with ease. Perhaps, he was too handsome for the part in the end, and director Nicholas Ray needed someone fresher and new to the scene. James Dean definitely had that mumbly, vulnerable, dorkish quality about him, that Marlon would just never possess. And like they say, some things are just meant to be.


He would go on to make plenty more memorable parts in his life time, as well as one of the lucky actors to have won two Academy Awards for Best Actor. Thanks to the graces of modern technology we can glimpse at this long lost memory today, and submit to the land of might have been.

marlon brando -stanley

The guy’s got some chops, you have to admit!

Until next time,

{theEye}

+

Similar Stories:

E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {August 15th, 2012}

{Grace Kelly on the set of High Society by Dennis Stolk. Circa.1956}

Similar Stories:
    

1956: Elvis Hits! But You Haven’t Seen Anything Yet!


Saturday, Jan. 28, 1956, this would mark the first time Elvis Presley would appear on national television!  He would appear on the Dorsey Brothers Show.  Still an unknown to the world,  Elvis did not draw a large studio audience.  He would perform 3 songs before the hosts ensured Elvis would be back the following week.


According to a service man who was in the audience the night on that fateful rainy night, “I often went on Saturday nights to the Dorsey brothers show and I was there when Elvis Presley made his national television debut on that show. I had never heard of him and was startled when he appeared on stage and hundreds of girls began screaming.”

That night was the night that changed the life of this young fella that could shake his hips and rock blue eye shadow on occasion.  Redefining how we think of pop stars,   Elvis left more than his mark on music and style history.   For anybody who knocks ‘The King’, we call you out, because this was a guy who knew what to wear, when to wear it, and ruled his time on earth.

Similar Stories