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{MUSIC MINUTE}: “Take it Easy My Brother Charles” by Jorge Ben

Tropicalia Soul - Jorge Ben and Company

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Take it from our old friend Jorge Ben . . .

Best take it easy for now, my friends and brothers!

Please enjoy!

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Yours truly,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {May 2, 2016}

E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day - May 2, 2016- Vampire Lookalike Competition- circa. 1950s - Vintage Style Fashion Blog

+++Vampira Look – a- Like Competition+++

Hollywood, California

{circa. 1950s}

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+ + + + Read more about Vampira (actress Maila Nurmi) + + + +

an original E.O.F. STYLE DIVINITY

+READ AT YOUR OWN RISK+

{images may conjure inspiration}

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Unti we meet again,

{theEye}

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[UPDATED PRICES IN THE {SHOP} – use XIXIXI at the checkout for 25% OFF]

The Eye of Faith Gets “Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller”

 

portrait_cardiff_miller_2012

[Photo: Zev Tiefenbach]

The world of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and Geroge Bures Miller exist somewhere between reality and the vortex of our imaginations. . . 

The artist duo are known for their of-this-world out-of-this-world creations that combine objects, sound, images, mechanics, lighting, construction, and cinema to create one-of-kind experiments and showcases in the transcendental quality and nature of art.

As one of the world’s most internationally respected artist partnerships, we were lucky to get a chance to enjoy a retrospective of their work, in an exhibit appropriately title “Lost in the Memory Palace”, which runs from April 6 until August 18, 2013 at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

From the beginning of their partnership in 1995 to their work today, the artist duo have expertly managed to create evocative and multi-textural and dimensional works that transport its viewers to other worlds and often exotic states of mind.

portrait-janet cardiff and george miller_Bodtlaender

The duo has cited cinema as a major driving force in their work, bringing the immersive technology of the cinema to life in a gallery setting,  allowing the viewers an accessibility and availability that is mostly foreign to other works in the art gallery setting. While we are often encouraged to keep a distance in the world of art, Cardiff-Miller’s pieces are encouragingly tactile and require a closer look.

This is not a show that you can skim through and really “get” immediately. Going into it with this frame of mind would be disaster.

Like a film, the pieces require a dose of commitment, and an ability to get lost in the world being offered to you by the artists. The worlds are often slightly disturbing as you notice odd-looking effigies, or are startled by an abrupt sound; the element of mystery is definitely in the air, forcing you to question your own reality.

Such is the case with “Dark Pool”, the couple’s first installation created in 1995.

Cardiff Miller- Dark Pool

darkpool_4

I like that the technology is so popular it is almost invisible so that people can become intimate with it. At the same time the recorded voice is removed and has a sense of past that a real voice doesn’t, so it can actually get closer to the audience through that removal. They feel safe being intimate with a removed voice.

-Janet Cardiff

You are invited to open a paint chipped antiquated door to enter a long, dark, small room filled to the brim with boxes, books, furniture, rolling racks, and antique objects. You might want to, at first, turn back in fear of what could be lurking in the shadows, but very quickly you find yourself exhilarated by curiosity. As you walk through the room, you hear voices and whispers from the past (children, an elderly woman, a young couple), and begin to notice the clues all around you:

darkpool_3

darkpool_5e

darkpool_5c

[Photos: Cardiff/Miller]

An opened book on reading tea leaves sits behind a tray full of dirty empty tea cups. Two viewfinders, side by side, show a man and woman in a passionate embrace, the other shows a couple with signs of stagnant disdain. You see a collection of porcelain hands. A half-eaten biscuit on a plate. You hear the sound of Judy Garland launch from the radio singing her tragic anthem, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”. You notice a book that dictates the signs of mental instability.

Often times, as in the case of “Storm Room” (2009), the imagined world is created so thoroughly, you really do question whether the artists have perhaps maneuvered a time slip or some sort of trans-continental teleportation device to get you to the empty Dentist’s office near Tokamachi, Japan, that was recreated for the piece.

Storm Room 1

[Photo: N.M. Hutcgubson]

An elaborate system of pipes, lighting, and speakers provide an uber realistic rendition of finding yourself unsure, even whilst in the comfort of “safety”. You can hear the coughing of a neighbour in the next “room”, and while you wait for the storm to “end”, you find yourself wondering where exactly you might have landed.

Storm Room 2

[Photo: N.M. Hutcgubson]

As water streams down the windows, and the rolling sound of thunder rattles the floor, you notice a roll of Japanese dental floss, buckets filling with water, a telephone, some old Japanese calendars, and a floor fan that only helps instil the uncomfortable quality of a 1960s Hiroshi Teshigahara film.

The Killing Machine- Cardiff Miller

[Photo: Seber Ugarte & Lorena Lopez]

Another unsettling piece, 2007’s  “The Killing Machine”, transports to a world unexpected and unknown. Forcing the viewer to imagine the violence and pain of being held on its soft pink fur chair at the will of two  elegantly choreographed, rotating stabbing wands, the piece is equally unsettling as it is beautiful.

Cardiff Miller- the killing machine - 2007

[Photo: Seber Ugarte & Lorena Lopez]

A statement on the nature of capital punishment, as well as a riff off Franz Kafka’s “In the Penal Colony”, the piece works on the level that it blends these horrors with a beautiful array of coloured lights, a disco ball (who doesn’t love a disco ball?), and almost triumphant orchestration for a bizarrely amusing and eerie imagining of our society’s indifference to killing.

The most impacting piece, had to be the first piece ventured to in the gallery – “Opera for a Small Room” which the couple created in 2005. The piece is a 20 minute long immersion into the tale of a sad and mysterious man (“R DENNEHY”) who speaks throughout the piece about his sad tale of lost love, and a seemingly lost sense of self.

Cardiff Miller - Opera for a Small Room

[Photo: Cardiff/Miller]

Contained in a small shed-like space filled to the brim with nearly 2,000 individual records, eight record players, and twenty-four antique loudspeakers; the piece encapsulate a mysterious, melancholy, and mildly sinister mood, all while telling the story of the strange man who embodies the space between the sounds of various arias, sounds, songs, and pop music. The entire story is aligned with the change of synchronized light and colour.

cardiff miller- opera for a small room- detail

cardiff miller- opera for a small room- detail 2

[Photo: Cardiff/Miller]

As the piece progresses you are enticed to circle the “room” to peer through the wall’s various cut-outs and doorways in hopes of gaining new perspectives on the world inside. As your eyes begin to wander you notice bowling trophies, suitcases, and other objects that add to this strange simulated reality. Its an opus of emotion, and another testament to the artists’ unique craft.

opera for a small room- cardiff miller- room

[Photo: Kunsthaus Bregenz]

   Writing is like a 3-Dimensional process for me. The words and sentences have to work with a physical space, resonate with that space. One thing works on the page but it’s a different thing when they are juxtaposed with a physical environment.

Janet Cardiff

Like a movie in real time playing before your eyes, the works of Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller are remarkable and exciting works of contemporary Canadian art that we are lucky enough to have gotten the chance to enjoy so closely and thoroughly.

The artists’ cinematic tendencies and unusual combination of various sound and media point to a world where the disparate worlds of various arts and industry can coincide and exist together, for engaging and elevating works of art that not only provide an aesthetic experience, but delve deep into the psyche to penetrate the world of dream, nightmare, and emotion.

To put it plainly, “Lost in the Memory Palace” is as close to Utopia as we’ve seen in this world yet. There are plenty of other pieces by the couple to enjoy at the exhibit, so be sure not to miss out on this incredibly poignant and realized showing on now at the AGO.

“Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller” at the Art Gallery of Ontario {April 6, 2013 – August 18, 2013}, for more info click here.

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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Music Minute: “Egyptian Shumba” by The Tammys

the tammys- vintage newspaper clipping

Word on the street is The Tammy’s are regarded as one of Girl Group history’s greatest treasures.

You may not have heard of them, but you’re not to blame, as this is just one of their remarkable gems they managed to leave behind for us all to hear. In fact, this single was all but lost until being found again at the beginning of this century.

“In the spring of 1964, it peaked at #30 on Cleveland rock music surveys, and #15 in Pittsburgh. It was popular at high school and college dances throughout the Midwest, but somehow never made it onto the national charts…”

This is one HELLUVA ride so make sure you’re ready to take this boundary defying and strange, weird, intensely out of this world experience known as “Egyptian Shumba” – an absolute favourite that totally goes with the jist of this place…

This place?

 +The Eye of Faith+, B*$@%*!!!

We’re still searching for all your innermost desires . . .

Sincerely,
{theEye}
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III.

{A girl’s got to do, what a girl’s got to do . . .}

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{EL CORAZON!}

Lead on!

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Do you have something to say? SAY IT! Don’t hold back … EVER. Leave a comment below, or email us:

hello@theeyeoffaith.com

Would love to hear from you!

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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Tour the Junction: Masonic Mondays

[Photo Source: James Ellis: Architect of the Junction]

Nearly two years ago, when we relocated to Toronto’s historic Junction neighborhood, we were drawn to the area’s rich culture and history.

Most famously, the Junction is known to have jump started Prohibition laws, declaring a community-wide ban on alcohol in 1904 that lasted voluntarily up into the year 2000!

Not that the people of the Junction don’t enjoy a good time. In fact, the neighborhood is more alive than ever housing dozens of thriving businesses that include Galleries, Antiques, Organic & Raw Foods, Books, Gyms, and Clothing.

In an article by the New York Times, the Junction was even compared to Aboott Kinney Boulevard in Venice, California, for it’s cool digs and industrial vibe, naming it “Skid Row Hip”. Not bad, Junction! Way to go!

One of the coolest places you can make your way to would definitely have to be the Toronto West Masonic Temple on the corner of Annette & Pacific, just beside the beautiful Annette Street Toronto Public Library. The two buildings were built by architect James August Ellis (1856-1935).

The construction of the building began in 1909, and remains one of the finest and most impressive Masonic Temples in the country, and many of the Temple’s earliest members became movers and shakers in the community.

The Temple’s design is based on actual descriptions of King Solomon’s Temple in Jerusalem, and the shape, and configuration of rooms have been arranged to correspond with the actual layout and decoration of the ancient temple.

The Temple was built without any windows, as so Non-Masons cannot illicitly learn any of the Masonic activities that take place within it’s walls. The Temple is active and currently still in use by members of the Prince of Wales Lodge 630 and Victoria Lodge 474.

The Temple is striking in it’s simplicity, especially beside the Beaux-Arts grandeur of the Annette Street Library next door. I can’t help but wonder how the two buildings function so close together. The library, a source of knowledge, the Temple, also a source of knowledge…sacred secret knowledge.

The two buildings were designed by the same architect, and perhaps hold more secrets than knowledge. But as with most things Masonic, everything is in plain view. The Temple’s doors depict the Square and Compass, the Sun, and the Royal Arch (another Masonic organization).

Above is a stained glass pentagram, an ancient symbol that defines man.

It may seem sinister, but in fact, a five pointed star alludes simply to humanity. Five fingers, five toes, five senses, five stages of life (birth, adolescence, coitus, parenthood and death). Five wounds of Christ on the cross. Five Pillars of the Muslim faith, alongside five daily prayers. Even the Wiccan kiss is fivefold- feet, knees, womb, breasts, and lips.

“Audi, Vidi, Tace” / “I see, I hear, and I am Silent”

[Slogan for the United Grand Lodge of Canada]

[Photo Source: PICCSY]

Drawing a pentagram you may also notice it only takes a single line. Where you start the pentagram, you also finish it.

This symbolizes the journey of man from birth to God. This is the plight of every Mason, to attain a destiny higher than that of this Earth. The rites and rituals held within these brick walls would help the initiates achieve this destiny.

Five is also symbolic of Mars, God of War to the Greeks, and Horus to the Egyptians. It signifies severity, conflict and harmony through conflict….(interesting)

The primary belief of the Masonic brotherhood is that of the Supreme Being. This extends beyond the context of any organized religion, and focuses on the primary life force at work with us on the day to day, as well as the  origins of Man, and our inherent destiny.

Since the Middle Ages, Masons have been the source of speculation and controversy, and were persecuted by the Church in the same manner as those accused of sorcery. Since the Masonic tradition is centered around the Supreme Being, religious fundamentalists often point to this as a conflict of interest to the one and only true God. What the F is with that?

Hundreds of books have been written on the subject, which seems to be growing more and more in the popular media, so it’s definitely good to dig and do some real reading on the subject as not to get carried away by myths, folklore, and the lengths Hollywood will go to exploit and entertain.

As for the West Toronto Masonic Temple, it remains as enigmatic as it appears in my pictures. Strong and noble, it’s simplicity speaks. There are no secrets to it, really. The words MASONIC TEMPLE are boldly engraved on the front of the building, and ask any Mason about their secret society – the first thing you might learn is that it’s not secret, whatsoever.

In fact, all you have to do is ask, and you can join (as long as you are 21, believe in a Supreme Being, are Male, and have reference from two members). Invitations are strictly forbidden, so expressing your interest is the key. Also, don’t expect immediate riches or status, as every man ultimately creates his own destiny.  The primary goals of each Lodge are charity and the community.

Click here to learn more.

<<TORONTO WEST MASONS OFFICIAL SITE>>

Directly across the way from the West Toronto Masonic Temple is an interesting addition to the community.

The Victoria Lofts are one of the stand-out new developments in the neighborhood, and it’s presence cannot be missed. Standing straight across from the Library & Masonic Temple, the new condos have made their home in what used to be the Victorian Presbyterian Church.

It’s an impressive complex, and it’s near impossible not to say ” I wish I lived there”, especially checking out the church’s impressive steeple.

There are definitely many churches on this strip at Annette, and it’s very interesting to see one of the largest and oldest being converted into luxury lofts for young professionals in the area.

[Source: Google Maps]

Seeing as the Church operated for over 120 years, it’s hard to imagine living amongst the walls built on what was once sacred hallowed ground. I guess it still is, really. And the close proximity of the Masonic Temple to the Presbyterian Church, is also something interesting to query.

This, among other things, make walking down Annette a true joy, and completely helped us fulfill our Masonic Monday! So, definitely if you’re in the area, you’re best to check out the corner of Pacific and Annette for a little history, as well as conjure a bit of mystery….

Make sure to check out our E.O.F.  MASTER {MASON} Style!

[All photos, unless noted, were taken by and are property of The Eye of Faith.com]

Sincerely,

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+ {theEye} +

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Music Minute: The Ugly’s – “It’s Alright”

Says it’s alright, folks! This is a really fun and fancy tune from The Ugly’s of Birmingham UK, circa 1966 – super RARE, but we got it here! Something about it just makes you feel quite alright, indeed! Nothing UGLY about it!

Enjoy this one. Short and Sweet.

{the Eye}


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