Tag Archives: sound

+E.O.F. STYLE DIVINITY+ PATTI QUATRO ! ! ! PLUS {GET THE LOOK}

Patti Quatro is HOT - EOF Style Divinity

We’ve always had a thing for Patti Quatro.

The statuesque brunette of the classic Detroit girl group, The Pleasure Seekers, and sister to Suzi Quatro, Patti is a triumphant figure who put the power of beauty, style, and girl power to the forefront of our culture, and helped propelled the things we take for granted in our contemporary world.

Patti Quatro Ericson on July 25, 2011

Thank the heavens for E.O.F. correspondent John Wisnewski, who got the chance to ask this Girl Group maven some questions about her captivating life.

 

JOHN: What was the first band that you were in, Patti?

PATTI:First band I was in was The Pleasure Seekers, started in 1964 when I was 16 years old and Suzi was 14, in Detroit Rock City. We grew our talent jamming with all our home boys…..Ted Nugent, Bob Seger, MC5, Alice Cooper, Iggy, etc…….all honing our craft as we played the teen circuits together.

The Pleasure Seekers - Fall 1965 - Girl Power- EOF Style Divinity
THE PLEASURE SEEKERS- 1968:69- COME SAIL AWAY WITH ME - EOF STYLE DIVINITY- PATTI QUATROPleasure Seekers Make It Happen- EOF STYLE DIVINITY - Patti QuatroTHE PLEASURE SEEKERS- GORGEOUS- VINTAGE INSPIRATION- STYLE DIVINITY
JOHN: When did you join Fanny?

PATTI: Joined Fanny in 1973 at Xmas time…….first gig was the Whiskey at which John Lennon saw our debut, and we did “Oh Darling” for him.

We be Jammin and Jammin and Jammin- EOF STYLE DIVINITY- Patti QuatroThe Quatro Sisters- Patti and Suzi - EOF Style Divinity

JOHN: Patti, Fanny paved the way for future female fronted groups-  does Fanny receive recognition for this?   

PATTI: All our roots bands receive recognition constantly from magazines, interviews, fans, etc…..people who appreciate us forging the road for women.    Actually, Suzi and I started the earliest at 14 and 16 in Detroit……earliest heavy rocking all female band…1964.   Others started later, and were more soft/girly sounding.

Lazy Summer with The Pleasure Seekers- EOF STYLE DIVINITY- PATTI QUATROThe Pleasure Seekers- CIRCA 1967 - EOF STYLE DIVINITY- PATTI QUATRO

We had that Detroit grit energy from growing up jamming with Nugent, Alice, Iggy, MC5,Seger, etc. We all paved the way…..me and my sister and our roots bands, as well as Fanny. Suzi and I and our bands were recognized in Detroit/Michigan’s Hall of Fame awards last year and the year before.

Hopefully Fanny will be at some point. But, Suzi has had more than a few honours for her contributions.
The Quatro Sisters are HOT- EOF Style Divinity- Patti Quatro
JOHN: Have yourself and Suzi Quatro ever played any live appearances together?
PATTI: We just played together when she was awarded her woman of valor award from MEOW in March….a huge conference here in austin, Tx and we played together for first time since 1990’s.

 

Patti Quatro in The Pleasure Seekers - EOF Style DivinityPleasure Seekers- Punk Sisters- EOF Style Divinity - Patti Quatro

JOHN: Of all the performers and artists that you knew, were there any that you were very impressed by?

PATTI: Bob Seger — his humility, songwriting talent.

Jeff Beck — his pure joy of his instrument and support of women musicians in an era when women did not rock guitars and till today.

Jimmy Page — his enormous creativity on his instrument — pure talent.
the pleasure seekers - eof style divinity- patti quatro
JOHN: Could you name some of your favorite bands, Patti?
PATTI: Nickelback, Jeff Beck, Zeppelin, Joe Cocker, Halestorm, Gary Moore . . . 
EOF STYLE DIVINITY- PATTI QUATRO AND THE PLEASURE SEEKERS - 1969
JOHN: Will you be releasing an album? 
PATTI: Already did two of our history. Don’t know what future holds.
THE EYE OF FAITH: Who does ? 🙂
Thank you to Patti Quatro for lending us her time and insight into her beautiful life!
And as always, thanks to John Wisnewski for bringing Ms. Quatro and The Pleasure Seekers to the forefront of our memory!!!
And if you’re dying to {GET THE LOOK} 

then look no further than our {SHOP}!

We are uploading new pieces every week, and keep getting new pieces on the daily to fulfill any style inspiration you could imagine! We are thrilled to have some pieces from Danielle Plester‘s LOST & FOUND VINTAGE collection in the store at 126 James North, and have been posting some key pieces in the {SHOP} since her arrival, so be sure to check it out!
So here’s some of our FAVOURITE FINDS to {GET THE LOOK}!
THIS is what THE EYE OF FAITH is all about. 
The perfect compilation between the {PAST} , {PRESENT}, and {FUTURE}. 
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 Are you coming or not, baby?

Until next time,

{theEye}

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Music Minute: “Condition Red” by The Goodees

“Why doesn’t he get a haircut? Why doesn’t he shave? You know, he used to be such a nice looking fellow until he grew that awful beard…”

Here’s a wonderfully atmospheric and dazzling Music Minute provided by the original good girls driven bad, The Goodees.

Some say they are a complete rip-off of the more famous Shangri-Las, but The Goodees give it like their momma is gonna take it away in an equally charming and seductively innocent way.

A fantastic narrative is enhanced by the flourish of its Pop-charged orchestration, and some thrilling sound effects to make this story a well rounded tale of youthful resilience, adventure, and lost love.

There’s no doubting that this single fits amongst the legendary moments of pure Girl Group GOLD!  Listen to this tune once, or over and over again as we have been since the minute we heard this song entitled “Condition Red”….

Hope You Enjoy!

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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{Music Minute} “Shaung Shaung Yan” by Den Bai Ying

Found my In the Mood for Love soundtrack lying around at home.

It’s been a while since I’ve listen to it. I had boughten it high school, enticed by the album cover and vaguely noting some Awards buzz that had been circulating on the internet at that time, I thought my disposable teenage income was worth the $25 I remember it costing. . .

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To say the least, I was enthralled immediately by the solemn tone of the soundtrack mixed with eclectic vintage oldies that ranged from Nat King Cole to this cool Chinese track entitled “Shaung Shaung Yan” by Dan Bai Ying.

It brings me to a place. I like that place. It conjures up images from the film which are as haunting as every Wong Kar Wai film always is.

He always brings a stylistic edge that is so cinematic, but simple, and absolutely graceful in its visual prose and chemistry in action. The film is a menagerie of mood through colour, and watch how drastically and dramatically colour plays a role in his movies.

in_the_mood_for_love- cool vintage asian 1960s inspiration

This matched with the cuts and characters of the clothing chosen for each scene, and you have a virtual vortex of vintage inspiration before your eyes. . .

I like to conjure this film when I want to feel cool and relaxed but sophisticated and worldly.

in_the_mood_for_love_1999_tony leung-vintage style inspirationIn the Mood for Love- vintage inspiration- the eye of faith.

Slick suits, hair, graphic ties, and sun glasses at night for the boys; and for the ladies, try some Asian inspiration with a glamorous 1960s edge that always gives off the ultimate sense of cool. Give everything a tropical edge to make it true.

Here’s some stuff in our {SHOP} that can help you get In the Mood for Love:

Visit the {SHOP} for more! 

Things are going, so don’t wait too long to jump at it.

Feel free to email me at the.eye.of.faith@gmail.com with any questions or concerns.

Don’t forget to stay inspired!

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Until next time,

{theEye}

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The Eye of Faith Gets “Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller”

 

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[Photo: Zev Tiefenbach]

The world of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and Geroge Bures Miller exist somewhere between reality and the vortex of our imaginations. . . 

The artist duo are known for their of-this-world out-of-this-world creations that combine objects, sound, images, mechanics, lighting, construction, and cinema to create one-of-kind experiments and showcases in the transcendental quality and nature of art.

As one of the world’s most internationally respected artist partnerships, we were lucky to get a chance to enjoy a retrospective of their work, in an exhibit appropriately title “Lost in the Memory Palace”, which runs from April 6 until August 18, 2013 at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

From the beginning of their partnership in 1995 to their work today, the artist duo have expertly managed to create evocative and multi-textural and dimensional works that transport its viewers to other worlds and often exotic states of mind.

portrait-janet cardiff and george miller_Bodtlaender

The duo has cited cinema as a major driving force in their work, bringing the immersive technology of the cinema to life in a gallery setting,  allowing the viewers an accessibility and availability that is mostly foreign to other works in the art gallery setting. While we are often encouraged to keep a distance in the world of art, Cardiff-Miller’s pieces are encouragingly tactile and require a closer look.

This is not a show that you can skim through and really “get” immediately. Going into it with this frame of mind would be disaster.

Like a film, the pieces require a dose of commitment, and an ability to get lost in the world being offered to you by the artists. The worlds are often slightly disturbing as you notice odd-looking effigies, or are startled by an abrupt sound; the element of mystery is definitely in the air, forcing you to question your own reality.

Such is the case with “Dark Pool”, the couple’s first installation created in 1995.

Cardiff Miller- Dark Pool

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I like that the technology is so popular it is almost invisible so that people can become intimate with it. At the same time the recorded voice is removed and has a sense of past that a real voice doesn’t, so it can actually get closer to the audience through that removal. They feel safe being intimate with a removed voice.

-Janet Cardiff

You are invited to open a paint chipped antiquated door to enter a long, dark, small room filled to the brim with boxes, books, furniture, rolling racks, and antique objects. You might want to, at first, turn back in fear of what could be lurking in the shadows, but very quickly you find yourself exhilarated by curiosity. As you walk through the room, you hear voices and whispers from the past (children, an elderly woman, a young couple), and begin to notice the clues all around you:

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[Photos: Cardiff/Miller]

An opened book on reading tea leaves sits behind a tray full of dirty empty tea cups. Two viewfinders, side by side, show a man and woman in a passionate embrace, the other shows a couple with signs of stagnant disdain. You see a collection of porcelain hands. A half-eaten biscuit on a plate. You hear the sound of Judy Garland launch from the radio singing her tragic anthem, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”. You notice a book that dictates the signs of mental instability.

Often times, as in the case of “Storm Room” (2009), the imagined world is created so thoroughly, you really do question whether the artists have perhaps maneuvered a time slip or some sort of trans-continental teleportation device to get you to the empty Dentist’s office near Tokamachi, Japan, that was recreated for the piece.

Storm Room 1

[Photo: N.M. Hutcgubson]

An elaborate system of pipes, lighting, and speakers provide an uber realistic rendition of finding yourself unsure, even whilst in the comfort of “safety”. You can hear the coughing of a neighbour in the next “room”, and while you wait for the storm to “end”, you find yourself wondering where exactly you might have landed.

Storm Room 2

[Photo: N.M. Hutcgubson]

As water streams down the windows, and the rolling sound of thunder rattles the floor, you notice a roll of Japanese dental floss, buckets filling with water, a telephone, some old Japanese calendars, and a floor fan that only helps instil the uncomfortable quality of a 1960s Hiroshi Teshigahara film.

The Killing Machine- Cardiff Miller

[Photo: Seber Ugarte & Lorena Lopez]

Another unsettling piece, 2007’s  “The Killing Machine”, transports to a world unexpected and unknown. Forcing the viewer to imagine the violence and pain of being held on its soft pink fur chair at the will of two  elegantly choreographed, rotating stabbing wands, the piece is equally unsettling as it is beautiful.

Cardiff Miller- the killing machine - 2007

[Photo: Seber Ugarte & Lorena Lopez]

A statement on the nature of capital punishment, as well as a riff off Franz Kafka’s “In the Penal Colony”, the piece works on the level that it blends these horrors with a beautiful array of coloured lights, a disco ball (who doesn’t love a disco ball?), and almost triumphant orchestration for a bizarrely amusing and eerie imagining of our society’s indifference to killing.

The most impacting piece, had to be the first piece ventured to in the gallery – “Opera for a Small Room” which the couple created in 2005. The piece is a 20 minute long immersion into the tale of a sad and mysterious man (“R DENNEHY”) who speaks throughout the piece about his sad tale of lost love, and a seemingly lost sense of self.

Cardiff Miller - Opera for a Small Room

[Photo: Cardiff/Miller]

Contained in a small shed-like space filled to the brim with nearly 2,000 individual records, eight record players, and twenty-four antique loudspeakers; the piece encapsulate a mysterious, melancholy, and mildly sinister mood, all while telling the story of the strange man who embodies the space between the sounds of various arias, sounds, songs, and pop music. The entire story is aligned with the change of synchronized light and colour.

cardiff miller- opera for a small room- detail

cardiff miller- opera for a small room- detail 2

[Photo: Cardiff/Miller]

As the piece progresses you are enticed to circle the “room” to peer through the wall’s various cut-outs and doorways in hopes of gaining new perspectives on the world inside. As your eyes begin to wander you notice bowling trophies, suitcases, and other objects that add to this strange simulated reality. Its an opus of emotion, and another testament to the artists’ unique craft.

opera for a small room- cardiff miller- room

[Photo: Kunsthaus Bregenz]

   Writing is like a 3-Dimensional process for me. The words and sentences have to work with a physical space, resonate with that space. One thing works on the page but it’s a different thing when they are juxtaposed with a physical environment.

Janet Cardiff

Like a movie in real time playing before your eyes, the works of Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller are remarkable and exciting works of contemporary Canadian art that we are lucky enough to have gotten the chance to enjoy so closely and thoroughly.

The artists’ cinematic tendencies and unusual combination of various sound and media point to a world where the disparate worlds of various arts and industry can coincide and exist together, for engaging and elevating works of art that not only provide an aesthetic experience, but delve deep into the psyche to penetrate the world of dream, nightmare, and emotion.

To put it plainly, “Lost in the Memory Palace” is as close to Utopia as we’ve seen in this world yet. There are plenty of other pieces by the couple to enjoy at the exhibit, so be sure not to miss out on this incredibly poignant and realized showing on now at the AGO.

“Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller” at the Art Gallery of Ontario {April 6, 2013 – August 18, 2013}, for more info click here.

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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Music Minute: “Satan is Her Name” by Steve King

satan is her name

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This is a new old classic for you all to enjoy.

Just a little something to escape the day . . .

This is Steve King singing “Satan is Her Name

A great video accompanies it too, from Ray Flash!

It was an obvious choice for us here at The Eye of Faith . . .

Hope it works for you too !!!

Please enjoy!

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satan is her name 2

Oh, Lover . . .

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Until next time,

{theEye}

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“The Name Game” Challenge: Jessica Lange VS. Shirley Ellis

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It’s been about two weeks since American Horror Story: Asylum ended on FX, and for anyone who has seen the show, you will know that it is near impossible to get that rhythm and beat of Jessica Lange’s boppin’ rendition of the classic “The Name Game” which premiered in Episode 10 of the miniseries.

The scene, in which all the members of the cast work it out to the tune of Shirley Ellis’ 1964 hit is already sweeping the internet, and proves again that the show is there to push the boundaries of the genre, and take the story to the very outer limits of the audience’s expectation.

Surprising, Jessica Lange had never performed a sing and dance number throughout her expansive career, and so the scene was born, making everyone wonder why she hasn’t been shaking her thing and lip synching to herself before on screen. Absolutely electric, and ICONIC.

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Shirley Ellis, on the other hand, found immense success with the song, making her way to the top 3rd spot on the Billboard 100 with the number in 1965, but failed to have any follow-up success after this crazy song. It’s kind of a dirty word, but – one-hit-wonder, is often used to describe the career of Ms. Ellis who would release it a second time in the 60s, and again in 1973.

Now we are often looking for those bridges that lead us from the {Past} to the {Present}, and what better example than this! What we couldn’t manage was which version we enjoyed better?!

We grabbed videos of both Jessica Lange and Shirley Ellis performing the song, and were hoping to have a little battle, of sorts. They both have their merits, but we wanted to see which version struck the chord most with our readers!

So sit back, enjoy “The Name Game”,  and comment below which was your favourite!

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{VS.}

Nothing contrary about it. . . they’re both solidified into the zeitgeist, now!

So what did you think? who owned the challenge? Let us know in the comments below. You can also TWEET US or say your peace over on our FACEBOOK.

Don’t be shy!

Until shortly,

{theEye}

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Music Minute: “We’re all Water”- Yoko Ono (1971-72)

This music minute was brought to our attention by one of our friends, and the second we heard Yoko Ono‘s iconic cry, we knew we had a Music Minute on our hands.  We love strong artistic women who aren’t afraid to speak their mind.  Queen of the Lucid Dream, the track “We’re all water” truly draws the conversation… what do we all have in common? The thread of mankind linking us all together is simple! We are all Water!! (duh.)

An amazing recording with great musicians, Stan Bronstein is the KILLER sax player, Tex Gabriel is the other guitarist, Gary Van Scyoc is the bassist and Adam Ippolito is the keyboardist with Rich Frank as the drummer.  Oh, and did we mention it was produced by Phil Spector . Give this melodic jubilee a listen, and tell us what you guys think of The  Queen of the Peace Movement and Music Scene, Yoko Ono.

Sharing a similar experimental flavour as B-52’s smash “Rock Lobster“. We have to say this track somehow takes it to the next level with comparisons between iconic pop idols, and political figures.  From Chairman Mao to Richard Nixon, not to mention a few name drops of Marilyn Munro, Raquel Welsh, Lenny Bruce, and the Queen of England, this experimental jam really knocks our socks off and get’s our toe’s tappin’ BIG TIME.

{The Eye}
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Music Minute: “Paul’s Theme” from CAT PEOPLE

The recent death of Donna Summer really struck us by surprise, and in researching more about the 70s icon, we were introduced to another icon of music – Giorgio Moroder.

We spoke to the insane talents of the music maven responsible for some of the greatest songs every written (“What a Feeling”, “Call Me”, The Neverending Story !!!!), and are back paying our respects.

This time it’s “Paul’s Theme” from the film Cat People, starring Natassja Kinski and David Bowie- a wild musical odyssey that goes out to a very special somebody out there!

{YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE}

Sincerely,

{THE EYE}

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Ventriloquy: That, Dummy, Ain’t Funny!

Sometimes the thought of a porcelain doll could make us jump into our bed and hide under the covers.  But today we want to bring attention to the forgotten art of Ventriloquy.

Yes, once upon a time, people didn’t just use dolls to instill fear in small children and grown up alike.  There was a time when performing with a doll was a science! It was a huge part of the world of Vaudeville.  To bewilder and astound audiences with trained voices that could not be explained, and techniques and tactics to amuse and delight!

The first known use of Ventriloquy was back in 1584 if you’d believe it! Originally, ventriloquism was a religious practice. The name comes from the Latin ‘for to speak from the stomach’.  The Greeks called this gastromancy.  The noises produced by the stomach were thought to be the voices of the unliving, who took up residence in the stomach of the ventriloquist. The ventriloquist would then interpret the sounds, as they were thought to be able to speak to the dead, as well as foretell the future.

Naturally, the practice of interpreting sounds made by the human body after death was not so natural for most.  Manipulating a corpse to mimic speaking left most instinctively offended, and the whole art came off as ‘eerie’.  As a matter of fact, in the Middle Ages, Ventriloquism was thought to be similar to witchcraft.  As Spiritualism led to stage magic and escapology, ventriloquism became more of a performance art.  By the 19th Century it shed its mystical roots and has since become the freaky dummy play we know and love today.


The Eye.

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