Tag Archives: illumination

Crazy Mens Vintage 1950s / 60s Hair Style Videos!

 

Like every style discerning woman, a man needs a good hair-do too “…to give him all the confidence he needs” – at least according to these crazy 1950s / 60s archival films documenting some of the most popping hair crazes of the moment!

“No longer is it fashionable to have short backened sides; today a gentleman must concentrate on curls”, and perms, and matching partner twists!

God, there’s something so fantastic about watching these incredible dos be created and crafted so artfully by their technicians, and then enjoyed so outrightly by the men getting these out-of-this-world creations.

It means a lot to take pride your appearance, and most definitely at this time would have been perhaps quite strange to take it to this level – but these days we all know that books can most definitely be judged by their covers, so you might as well look your very best! And boy, did these boys know that . . .most particularly love the teen influences taking place here (ie. “The Twist” the dance, and matching partner hairstyle).

There is a huge resurgence of the male coiffure taking place these days, so don’t be surprised if you start seeing more complicated styles popping up in the {future} or near {present}. Even if we are wrong, it would sure be damn cool if they did!

 

It’s all about that transformative power of style, and if you can harness that ability, you got it made in the shade.

So, we hope you enjoy this cool blasts from the {past} and/or possibly {future}!

 Until next time,

{theEye}

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XIXIXI gets you 25% off at the CHECKOUT

How to Cook a Unicorn!

EOF- How to cook a Unicorn

“Taketh one unicorne . . .”

Talk about secret knowledge! It seems scholars are absolutely ecstatic to find a long lost Medieval cookbook that includes recipes and instructions for cooking Unicorns!

The book was uncovered by The British Library, and contains hundreds of recipes for classical Medieval dishes that include herring, tripe, fish stews, and pigeon, as well as a delicious recipe for black bird pie – just like the nursery rhyme!

Sing a song of sixpence

A pocket full of rye

 Four-and-twenty blackbirds

Baked in a pie.

But among the most interesting of the dishes presented in the beautifully illuminated pages of the book they believe dates back to the 14th Century, is a most peculiar instruction for the preparation of Unicorn, complete with pictures!

EOF- How to Cook a Unicorn 2

The recipe begins appropriately with the phrase “Taketh one unicorne” and continues to instruct the cook to take the meat of the beast and marinate in cloves and garlic and then roast it on the griddle. I think I want seconds, already!

Scholars believe the cookbook was written by famed chef of the moment, Geoffrey Fule, who served as the chef to Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Was this all just a jest? Or, could there be some truth to the matter?

Most people assume that Unicorns are only a myth, but perhaps those beautiful ponies with their majestic horns really did roam freely through the lands. Story goes that the unicorn’s horn holds magical properties that could cleanse poisoned waters and render the sick able again. Of course, you could only find them using a virgin. She would wander the forests until the unicorn, smelling the scent of virgin flesh, would greet her with his big hard spiralled horn . . .

LAST UNICORN

Today the unicorn has been reduced to the world animated child fantasy and nursery rhymes, but thousands of years ago, the Ancient Greeks didn’t just believe in the creatures as mythical beings, but as full fledge creatures which they studied and recorded in their natural history texts. We can also find mentions of the animal and its supernatural strength in various books of The Bible.

So, I guess the mystery is just bound to live on. Perhaps Fule was just using his imagination, and jotting down his ideas for a “What-if” kind of situation, but with all that heavy illuminating (which would take months on end), its hard to believe there wouldn’t have been a specific need for a Unicorn recipe. Also note that “COOKING” as we know it today, was much more of a magical and mystical art, especially in the Medieval times and Renaissance; an art that would run parallel to that of alchemy and other sacred knowledge practices.

Many grimoires from the same period will contain recipes for food alongside the details to invocating spirits, so perhaps Fule was not only a reputable chef, but was somewhat of a magician, who knew secrets, such as where to source Unicorn, and the advantages and benefits to eating it . . .

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The idea of eating a unicorn definitely is kind of gross, but I’m sure with the proper preparation it would be tolerable – or just skip the meal and steal the horn from the kitchen wench. Did they once cook Unicorn meat for the King & Queens of England?  It’s still a toss-up for me. What do YOU think?

You can read more at The British Library website!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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God is in the Details: Revealing the Early Renaissance @AGOToronto

Revealing the Renaissance at the AGO - secrets in florentine art - the Peruzzi Altar Piece

Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art (March 16 – June 16, 2013)

ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO (317 Dundas Street West)

$25 adult admission (includes admission to the rest of the gallery)

When thinking of the Renaissance, one might automatically conjure up images of Da Vinci, his Vetruvian man, and Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel. It is a period in history renowned for its surge of creativity, knowledge, and innovation in areas of art, literature, music, architecture, and science.

It is a period that is also become more and more in vogue due to its resurgence in popular culture with T.V. shows like “The Tudors”, “The Borgias”, and the upcoming “Da Vinci’s Demons”, all putting their spin to this exciting and important moment in history.

But, what is rarely captured is the true birth of this period, and the movers and shakers who brought it all to life.

Perhaps its the fact that most art historians do not even know the names of most of the incredible artisans who painstakingly brought the churches of Florence to life with incredibly illuminated manuscripts, carvings, stained glass windows, and beautifully detailed panel paintings, between the years 1300 and 1350, that truly did start it all.

Revealing the renaissance: stories and secrets in florentine art

This is what Sasha Suda and the curators of the Art Gallery of Ontario‘s latest exhibition, “Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art“, aim to bring to the forefront, allowing visitors to explore the lost masterworks that truly sparked a revolution, and would change the face of history forever.

In partnership with the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the curators have painstakingly worked on this exhibition for the past 10 years, travelling far and wide to analyze and bring overseas for the first time some of the most elaborate examples of work from this period that define the breaking point from the flatness of Medieval art to a more expressive and “humanized” perspective that has come to characterize the Renaissance.

Many of these pieces have been shut away from the public for centuries, making this one of the most impressive exhibits the AGO has ever premiered, and one that is sure to capture the imagination of all those lucky enough to visit.

The main gallery at Revealing the early renaissance- stories and secrets in florentine art - AGO- March 12, 2013

Sasha Suda Talks Art With Culture Minister Michael Chan

Curator Sasha Suda talks art with Michael Chan, Ontario Minister of Culture, Tourism, & Sport.  

One might, at first, be intimidated by the prestige of such an exhibit, but fear not, as this portal on the past is as much a reflection of our present day, as it is the 14th Century.

Whether or not you know a great deal about Renaissance art, the exhibition is packed full of information, from the audio guide, to the i-pads strategically placed amongst the exhibition to give you the full backstory on some of the exhibition’s most intriguing pieces. The curators have created an easy to understand story, that truly captures all the excitement and mystery of the artists and the works they created amidst the social context of Florence during this period.

Detail of the Peruzzi Altarpiece - christ wounds- revealing the early renaissance: stories and secrets in florentine art at the AGORevealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO -

God is in the Details . . .

As you first step into the gallery, it may not immediately strike you how these works differ from the Medieval illustrations and paintings you are used to, but upon closer examination, you will find how rich, textured, and full of emotion each piece truly is.

They are not works of art to be admired from afar, but works that deserve an acute eye, and a willingness to get lost in the stories being told within them.

There is a certain excitement generated as you begin to see the layers of colour, and painstakingly small brush strokes that capture the most miniscule details of hair and embroidery. While our culture might be used to multiple images rapidly flashing before our eyes (surely a luxury akin to witchcraft for the men and women of the Renaissance), one must note that the multi-faceted panels and illuminated manuscripts are akin to the cinema of the Renaissance, with all the drama, suspense, horror, and spectacle you could expect from a film of today, with even a bit of special effects here and there.

Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO

An exquisite panel painting. Blood, gore, and devotion. The piece reads almost like an expensive 14th Century comic . . .

It”s all for devotion sake, of course; used to invoke prayer, meditation, deep-thought, or contemplation. There’s definitely that sense of entertainment in the midst, often showcasing the more brutal and tumultuous moments of martyrs and Christ: Agatha with her breasts being cut off, another martyr is grilled on coals in ecstasy, and check out any crucified Christ in the mix and you’re bound to see more than your year’s worth of blood squirt (the most impressive, hands down, being Pacino Di Bonaguido’s “The Crucifixion” from 1315-1320, whose flowing blood rains on the spectators of the scene, as well as a juicy squirt from the chest for the viewer).

The Crucifixion by Pacino Bonaguida at the AGO - March 12, 2013 - Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and secrets in florentine art Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art at the AGO - Detail of Bonaguida's "THE CRUCIFIXION"

Pacino De Bonaguida’s “The Crucifixion” and Detail of (1315-1320)

And while, we might cringe at the sight of this, its patrons felt the bloodshed and pain was the human aspect of their faith, and that one day perhaps, they may themselves reach divination, as did their faithful predecessors.

Getting lost in each piece, you begin to see that this society was obsessed with their idols, and their chance to be a part of them was as easy as getting a master to paint them into a panel or manuscript. In essence, it equated a wealthy merchant to the status of celebrity, having made his way onto the pages alongside the kingdom of heaven complete with Christ, the Virgin, and all the many martyrs who gave their life to the dedication of their fate.

The most entertaining example of this is the Laudario of Sant’Agnesse; an illuminated choir book commissioned by the Compagnia di Sant’Agnese, a fraternity of merchants, for use in charitable events and prayer, and who are also illustrated along the margins of the music. This remarkable collection of 24 illustrated manuscripts have been framed and reunited for the first time since the early 1800s, and will be performed by musical guests Lionheart on April 6 in the Walker Court of the AGO (click for more details).

Detail of Daddi's "Crowned Virgin Martyr" - Revealin ghte Early Renaissance at the AGO - Toronto

Detail of “A Crowned Virgin Martyr {Catherine of Alexandria}” (1334 – 1338) by Bernardo Daddi. 

It is amazing to think that at one time, masters like Botticelli, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Michelangelo must have set their gaze on these exact works to hone their own craft, and garner inspiration to create the masterpieces of the Renaissance we marvel at today. For when staring at the suggestive expression of Bernardo Daddi’s “A Crowned Virgin Martyr” (1334-1338), a glimpse of Da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa”  with her mysterious stare, and face full of subtle shadows that delicately sculpt her face, can definitely be seen,  which make the exhibition all the more exciting, and relevant.

In many ways, the exhibition brings to light that not much has changed in the world of art and commerce; citing the importance of banking and the prosperous merchant class to the creation of these vital works of art. Being so wealthy, members of the merchant class became so concerned that they may not  reach heaven, that they began spending their fortunes on commissioning buildings, and filling them with new art that expressed their hopes, fears, ideals, and emotions.

Revealing the Early Renaissance at the AGO-A view of Bernardo Daddi Italian The Martyrdom of Saint Ursula and 11,000 Virgins

With prosperity, comes art – and not much has changed today, as many of the world’s most successful artists rely on wealthy investors and corporate big wigs to the cut the cheque on a commission. Perhaps they no longer fear purgatory for their sins, but they are most definitely keeping their fingers crossed that their commission could strike them big dollars, and in that way, achieve idol status, and a bit of heaven.

The exhibition has already been lauded by the Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times as one of the most important exhibitions in recent years, so don’t miss out on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to travel through time, and take in 90 once-hidden masterworks that came to redefine life as we know it today.

Agony and the Ecstacy - Blood and Gore - Revealing the Early Renaissance at the AGO

All the Agony & The Ecstacy . . .

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Revealing the Early Renaissance: Stories and Secrets in Florentine Art” opens at the AGO on March 16 and runs until June 16, 2013. To book your tickets today, click here!

Also be sure to check out the event schedule at the AGO for exciting insights inspired by this latest exhibit (Click here).

Sasha Suda, Michael Chan (Ontario Minister of Culture), and CEO at the AGO, Matthew Teitelbaum - March 12, 2013 - AGO Press Preview

Matthew Teitelbaum (CEO at the AGO), Sasha Suda (Assistant Curator of European art at the AGO), and Michael Chan (Ontario Minister of Culture, Tourism, & Sport) – March 12, 2013. 

Until next time,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {March 5, 2013}

EOF Snapshot- Eye in the Sky- Burning Passion - A Cup Full of Hope- Masonic Symbolism- The Rituals of Man - My Destiny is Decided By Me- Vintage Ephemera- Inspiration- Style

An Eye in the Sky, My Heart Burning Full of Passion,

and My Chalice Full of Enlightenment . . .

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The tools to your illumination.

The rituals to success.

Be brave and bold, and never give up.

Your dreams are made by you and you alone, and only through you can you find your true destiny . . .

Wish me luck!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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STAY TUNED THIS MONTH FOR MORE!

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 Take The Oath of The Eye

E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {November 29, 2012}

{EL CORAZON!}

Lead on!

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hello@theeyeoffaith.com

Would love to hear from you!

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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