Tag Archives: generation

{MONDAY} MUSIC MINUTE: “Once There Was a Hushpuppy” from Beasts of the Southern Wild

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When I die, the scientists of the future, they’re gonna find it all. They gonna know, once there was a Hushpuppy, and she live with her daddy in the Bathtub.

-Excerpt  from “Beasts of the Southern Wild

For anyone who has seen the film, starring the young, gifted, and beautiful Quvenzhané  Wallis, you must have figured out by now that “Beasts of the Southern Wild” is probably one of the best films to come out in the last decade, and will undoubtedly find a place in the timeless classics we will refer back on in the future.

It has a lot of deep, and often dark, melancholic undertones throughout, but somehow through the tireless imagination of young Hushpuppy (the revelation that is Ms. Wallis – who was only six during filming), and the unnerved determination of the residents of The Bathtub, an almost magic land cut off the from society by a flood wall in southern Louisiana; the message received by the end of the film was that of hope, community, and the ultimate joy of living.

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The film’s prose weaves together very real issues with mythical, allegorical, and almost fantasy-like elements in a way not achieved since the whimsical narration of Linda Manz in Terrence Malick’s “Days of Heaven”. Indeed, there is a Malickian sensibility throughout the film- the camera pans effortlessly through the scenery, focusing in on the subtleties and beauties in nature, light, and human expression. There is also some Fellini-like sensibilities, with many quirky characters, and the ability to bring the most mundane and normal daily events into the most seemingly magical ones.

The film is nominated for 4 Academy Awards this year, including Best Picture, and Best Actress for Quvenzhané, who has become the youngest nominee ever for the category. However, with Awards season comes the snubs, and one of the biggest at this year’s Academy Award ceremony is most definitely the fascinating score for “Beasts of the Southern Wild“.

Co-written by Dan Romer and director Benh Zeitlin, the film’s music is as much a character to the film, as the beautiful words, and almost other-worldly imagery. So in spirit of raising awareness for this film, and awesome, inspiring music , we thought of featuring the main theme, “There Once Was A Hushpuppy” by director Benh Zeitlin as this MUSIC MINUTE.

Hope you enjoy, and definitely see the film! To learn more about the film click here.


When it all goes quiet behind my eyes, I see everything that made me lying around in invisible pieces. When I look too hard, it goes away. And when it all goes quiet, I see they are right here. I see that I’m a little piece in a big, big universe. And that makes things right.

Excerpt from “Beasts  of the Southern Wild

Until next time,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. {Anti} Style Idol: Jack Kerouac [Jack is Back!]

“Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion.”

-Jack Kerouac

Every time style blogs or fashion mags bring up Jack Kerouac, they can’t seem to go past exploring his style choices with completely superficial mindsets. What would Jack Kerouac wear today? Where would he shop? Here’s where, and how?! Ta DA! NOTHING. OUTFIT.

“I went one afternoon to the church of my childhood and had a vision of what I must have really meant with “Beat”… the vision of the word Beat as being to mean beatific… People began to call themselves beatniks, beats, jazzniks, bopniks, bugniks and finally I was called the “avatar” of all this.”

“The Origins of the Beat Generation” in Playboy (June 1959)

For example, Esquire Magazine thinks Jack Kerouac would go for a Junya Watanabe coat with Louis Vuiton shoes to hang out with Allen Ginsberg. They also feature him in J.Crew, and for rolling down Beaker Street the shirt and bag combo by Loden Dager is hilarious. As noted in almost every comment, Jack Kerouac would likely never ever be caught wearing thousand dollar jackets, or Patrick Evrell anything, let along so many pairs of Louis Vuitton shoes. Who is Jack Kerouac supposed to be?

Granted, Kerouac can be seen in the simple, utilitarian, work wear looks they attempt to recreate. The only thing is, Kerouac wasn’t going for a certain kind of anything. He just was. That’s kind of the first rule about him.

Completing his draft of On the Road in April 1951 on a single 36 metre (120-foot) role of paper, this autobiographical tale of Kerouac’s journeys across America with his friends is considered the defining work of the ‘Beat Generation‘, and includes hundreds of references to the stories of his adventures on the road.

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“John Clellon Holmes … and I were sitting around trying to think up the meaning of the Lost Generation and the subsequent Existentialism and I said, ‘You know, this is really a beat generation’ and he lept up and said ‘That’s it, that’s right!'”

“The Origins of the Beat Generation” in Playboy (June 1959)

The book wasn’t published until September 5, 1957 but would quickly garner cult status , with it’s wide array of colorful characters, as well as it’s wonderfully liberated prose inspired by the jazz, drug, and poetry that would define the Beat movement.

It was a movement towards freedom, however, it wouldn’t be easily received by the mainstream critics who’s conservatism would lead them to question Kerouac’s anti-establishment philosophies and writing style. In an era of conformity, stuck in the politics of McCarthyism in America, Kerouac would keep doing it his way all the way to the end.

“If critics say your work stinks it’s because they want it to stink and they can make it stink by scaring you into conformity with their comfortable little standards. Standards so low that they can no longer be considered “dangerous” but set in place in their compartmental understandings.”

-Jack Kerouac

Is it all just a great strange dream? Jack Kerouac thought so. He also believed in the meditating powers of Buddha, not to mention having encountered God himself at his first Sacrament of Confession in 1928. He was told he he would suffer in life great pain and horrors but experience salvation in the end of it all.

Little talked about fact: Kerouac first began writing On the Road in Quebec French!

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[Kerouac’s parents were of French-Canadian descent, making Jack an honorary Canadian!]

Funny enough, Kerouac wasn’t exactly the artsy intellectual type in high school, that you might imagine. No doubt he was deep but Kerouac found his tall brooding frame and superior athletic skills leading him to running back for the high school football team, and eventually a scholarship to Columbia University. Who says jocks don’t write poetry?!

Just as his football career began soaring, Kerouac dropped out from school, and continued life in New York City with his girlfriend, Edie Parker. It was there on the Upper East Side he would meet such influential figures as Allen Ginsberg, Neal Casaday, William S. Burroughs who would turn up in many of Kerouac’s works.

Together, this group of misfits, along with others who shared similar views on life contrary to the devastating conservatism of America would band together to foster a movement towards artistic and sexual liberation; freedom free from censorship. Kerouac knew his greatest power would ultimately be his honesty, integrity, and commitment to the truth of the world.

The truth, you ask? It’s the same truth we all are looking for today. The meaning of life, and the truths of existence. Driving the highway searching for the faces of God. In fact, Jack insists:

” ‘On the Road’ was really a story about two Catholic buddies roaming the country in search of God. And we found him. I found him in the sky, in Market Street San Francisco (those 2 visions), and Dean (Neal) had God sweating out of his forehead all the way. THERE IS NO OTHER WAY OUT FOR THE HOLY MAN: HE MUST SWEAT FOR GOD. And once he has found Him, the Godhood of God is forever Established and really must not be spoken about.”

Though, Kerouac would most likely protest the fancy and folly of the fashion industry of 2012, there is definitely a regard to the poet and free-thinker for his laid-back and casual sensibilities. It’s easy to see the appeal – Kerouac is a very charismatic and handsome guy. Not only that, he always seems to have something on the mind- a sense of mystery.

And while polo shirts, trousers, and denim button-ups are easy to find, Kerouac’s one-of-a-kind rebel attitude and poetic insight make for most of Kerouac’s {anti}-style style. This is where style goes far beyond the clothes on one’s back, and reaches deep into the darkest depths of one’s very soul .

It’s the nonchalance and passion for life that exude from all things Kerouac, so it only makes sense that Kerouac’s day-to-day dress would reflect that in its unbuttoned simplicity.  We are talking about the guy who wrote a draft on one 120 foot long piece of paper, save the time of flipping through page after page.

“One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple.”

-Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums

There aren’t too many public figures like Jack Kerouac these days, sadly. He died relatively young. On October 20, 1969 Kerouac experienced a violent attack on his body. While sitting in his living room, drinking whiskey and malt liquor, scribbling on a notepad, the writer felt sick, and began throwing up large amounts of blood (“Stella, I’m bleeding!”).

On October 21, 1969 after never regaining consciousness after surgery for an internal hemorrhage due to his lifetime of drinking and drug use, the legend passed at 5:15 AM. Great pains and horrors, indeed. His last appearance on television would be on the William Buckley’s show in 1968 where he rambled about society in what was obviously a little bit of drunken tom foolery on the writer’s account.

“Ah, life is a gate, a way, a path to Paradise anyway, why not live for fun and joy and love or some sort of girl by a fireside, why not go to your desire and LAUGH…”

-Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac was raw and untamed, but this we could not fault him for. Like a pilgrim searching for deliverance from evil, Kerouac wandered the land. He kept his eyes open wide, and with his account, a brilliant and timeless perspective of life as an outsider continues to inspire us to this day.

What works most about Jack Kerouac’s style sense is that every man feels they could dress like that. It is not an intimidating look, but really falls on comfort and confidence. There is a mix of his athletic roots, kind-of-academic, and streetwise to boot. Having the latter two is of the dire essence.

“the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars.”

Jack Kerouac “On the Road”

Sam Riley as “Sal Paradise” in ‘On the Road’ (2012)

 

Walter Salles’ long awaited screen adaptation of the Kerouac classic premiered on May 23 at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. Sam Riley stars as Kerouac’s alter-ego, Sam Paradise, in the film. Click here to visit the film’s website.

And the legend blazes on . . .

{ANTI} STYLE IDOL: JACK KEROUAC

[March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969]

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Here’s some stuff we found to {GET THE LOOK}

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Until next time,

{theEye}

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Vanity Fair Names Their Icons of Style

Vanity Fair does as they do with their latest list of Style’s Greatest Icons. Picking from all of Hollywood history, writer Amy Fine Collins makes a jab at finding those identities who fascinate, inspire, and continually resonate with lovers of style and fashion.


For a list of 21 of the ultimate icons of style, we’re a little let down. The list is GOOD – pretty much your usual list including Marilyn, Audrey, Lauren, and Bette, and more current stars like George Clooney and Penelope Cruz making the cut. While Marlon Brando and Jean-Paul Belmundo made the cut, I was shocked not to find James Dean pop up on the list! I mean, George Clooney and NOT James Dean??! WTF?

I could go into more wishes and wants, but I won’t. Instead, take a look for yourself at the list, and let us know what YOU think! Who would you add to the list?

Here’s the list:

Fred Astaire
Grace Kelly
Marlon Brando
Lauren Bacall
Audrey Hepburn
Marlene Dietrich
Bette Davis
Marilyn Monroe
Leonardo Dicaprio
Joan Crawford
Penelope Cruz
Carole Lombard
Charlotte Rampling
Nicole Kidman
Jean Harlow
Clark Gable
Harry Belafonte
Johnny Depp
Cate Blanchett

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I do sincerely appreciate having Carole Lombard and Charlotte Rampling make the cut, but or me the biggest surprise was Leonardo Dicaprio. He’s the youngest name on the list, and although I’ve been musing over pictures of him in the 90s, I very often forget to credit the man for his continually classic and easy way about him. While the clothes are great, it’s the devil may care approach he takes to wearing them that really make his looks sing.

That for me is the biggest sign of true deep down in the heart style. For it’s not about what you wear, it’s who’s wearing it, and more often than not, that person is you!

The thing that makes each of these people a star is their ability to project a sense of self, and be fully committed to it. In the same respect, it is their ability to lose this self at the snap of a finger that makes being a star a true craft.

The films they are in are just the backdrop. The clothes a part of the scenery. It is all inspiration, and as Amy Fine Collins notes, designers today are continuously reinventing and re imagining films of the past to realize their vision for today.

That’s why we are continually looking to the past to inspire and tell us stories. Moments of magic to reinvent. For there is a beautiful mystery to the idea of being a star, especially the leading men and starlets of Hollywood Golden Years. A certain spirit seems to take over these mere mortals the second the lights are on and the camera is rolling. In the blink of an eye, that person is made immortal through the magical alchemy of light and silver.

“Everything…was an exaggeration of history, fiction and the whole wide extraordinary world.” states legendary Vogue editor Diana Vreeland. Sometimes there’s nothing better than a little exaggeration to get us through the day…

So as I was saying, the list is good, but our own E.O.F. Style Idols and Divinities are pretty damn special in their own right.

What’s the use of having a million lists online that tell me Audrey Hepburn is the best dressed woman there ever lived. Same goes with Grace Kelly, and Nicole Kidman (?? I mean, really??)…its 2012, after all, can’t things start to get a bit more interesting especially when it comes to our style icons…

The fashion world right now is ever changing, and in our post modern bubble, there is infinite possibility out there. There are also literally hundreds of styles being represented out there, so to always have lists of Style Icons that are the same really makes for not very much progress…

Seeing as it is 2012, I foresee great changes in the midst, especially in accord to perceptions of style. There is a younger generation of style aficionados out there, more equipped than we were ever to analyze and take on new ideas in dressing.

While the classics will also stay as such, style enthusiasts should definitely make room for finding new influences our predecessors, blinded by the flickering of celluloid, were not able to pick up on and bring these lost ideals to the forefront…

This goes for all areas of life. Don’t just blindly live your life being told what is what. Make it so by your own actions and doing.  Dress the part! Be the star! Change the world! That’s the message…and for that, Vanity Fair, we must thank!

So remember, stay wise, and don’t get caught floating in the status quo.

Yours truly,

{theEye}

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