Tag Archives: found art

E.O.F. SNAPSHOT OF THE DAY {DECEMBER 2, 2016}

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Subject Unknown. 

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{circa. 1940s}

The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science. He to whom the emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand wrapped in awe, is as good as dead —his eyes are closed. 

-Albert Einstein {source}

Exploring a plethora of vintage style inspiration in unexpected places.

Vernacular imagery gives us a sense of time and place, while also creating a relatability between us and the subject matter through the elusive mystery of the moment. As the Godfather of fashion, Karl Lagerfeld, proclaimed “What i like about photographs is that they capture a moment that’s gone forever, impossible to reproduce”; so it is the instantaneous feeling held forever in time by light and precious metal taken in the {past} forever capturing the {present} forever beheld into the {future}. 

That’s what truly has drawn us to vernacular imagery all these years, and has always been a huge foundation to our perception of style. While we are often worshiping the idols of golden ages past, it is the hidden mystery of unknown faces that truly inspires us and gives us a real sense of the spirit of style that permeates through the generations.

Take this Mystery Dapper Dude for instance – his face is blurred, there is a strange anomaly in the top right corner, and yet, this image is as fashion-centric as a spread in GQ (with a little more panache). You can tell he is handsome, but it is his nonchalant style that truly stands out. Mix of patterns, classic cool – its all happening, and always will, thanks to the magic of the moment.

Who says we can’t time travel?

Until next time,

{theEye}

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The Eye of Faith Shop Banner Boys

NEW FOUND IMAGES OF WAR FROM THE EYE OF FAITH!

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WAR? What is it good for?

ABSOLUTELY NOTHING!

Those are the words we have stuck in our head, as of late. With the world in such a dizzy spell of violence and outrage, its hard to believe in a world where war doesn’t exist. But, like the faithful dreamers we are, we will have hope.

War has been around for centuries, and probably since the dawn of man; and yet between the moments of fiery battle and angry destruction, we somehow all find moments of tranquility and joy.

We uncovered a huge collection of beautiful war time photography dating to World War 2 that capture brilliantly and honestly those moments of humanity that really make us the grand creatures we truly are destined to be.

There are smiles, and laughs, and plenty of love and friendship – so much so, that it becomes heartbreaking to imagine the lives of these young boys, and the persistence of wondering whether or not they even survived the tragedies that awaited them.

Here is a look at some of the mysterious moments captured that we now possess to share with the world never to be forgotten.

So, there’s an itty bitty taste of what our collection contains! You’ve seen other unique photos from our collection before, and many of them have been shipped off to museums and/or universities where they will be safely stored and studied for their remarkable sense of composition, as well as place and time.

We are so proud and honoured to have these vintage snapshots as a part of our brand, and I think it is so important for us to keep obtaining these and other photographs, as so these moments will not be lost in time, and the artists, though unknown, can retain some respect and admiration for their spur of the moment creative thought and action!

You’ll probably see a few of these posted on our Etsy {SHOP} over the next few days, so please check it out! Vintage vernacular photographs are one of a kind, and is an affordable way to start collecting art! You can guarantee these pieces will start a million conversations, which is just another aspect that is incredibly enjoyable when collecting vintage snapshot photography.

Not only are they art, but they are a piece of history! So head over now for a peak . . . 

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PLAY NICE!

[ Remember that code: XIXIXI gets you 25% off at the checkout ]

Until we meet again,

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The Eye of Faith Gets “Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller”

 

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[Photo: Zev Tiefenbach]

The world of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and Geroge Bures Miller exist somewhere between reality and the vortex of our imaginations. . . 

The artist duo are known for their of-this-world out-of-this-world creations that combine objects, sound, images, mechanics, lighting, construction, and cinema to create one-of-kind experiments and showcases in the transcendental quality and nature of art.

As one of the world’s most internationally respected artist partnerships, we were lucky to get a chance to enjoy a retrospective of their work, in an exhibit appropriately title “Lost in the Memory Palace”, which runs from April 6 until August 18, 2013 at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

From the beginning of their partnership in 1995 to their work today, the artist duo have expertly managed to create evocative and multi-textural and dimensional works that transport its viewers to other worlds and often exotic states of mind.

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The duo has cited cinema as a major driving force in their work, bringing the immersive technology of the cinema to life in a gallery setting,  allowing the viewers an accessibility and availability that is mostly foreign to other works in the art gallery setting. While we are often encouraged to keep a distance in the world of art, Cardiff-Miller’s pieces are encouragingly tactile and require a closer look.

This is not a show that you can skim through and really “get” immediately. Going into it with this frame of mind would be disaster.

Like a film, the pieces require a dose of commitment, and an ability to get lost in the world being offered to you by the artists. The worlds are often slightly disturbing as you notice odd-looking effigies, or are startled by an abrupt sound; the element of mystery is definitely in the air, forcing you to question your own reality.

Such is the case with “Dark Pool”, the couple’s first installation created in 1995.

Cardiff Miller- Dark Pool

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I like that the technology is so popular it is almost invisible so that people can become intimate with it. At the same time the recorded voice is removed and has a sense of past that a real voice doesn’t, so it can actually get closer to the audience through that removal. They feel safe being intimate with a removed voice.

-Janet Cardiff

You are invited to open a paint chipped antiquated door to enter a long, dark, small room filled to the brim with boxes, books, furniture, rolling racks, and antique objects. You might want to, at first, turn back in fear of what could be lurking in the shadows, but very quickly you find yourself exhilarated by curiosity. As you walk through the room, you hear voices and whispers from the past (children, an elderly woman, a young couple), and begin to notice the clues all around you:

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[Photos: Cardiff/Miller]

An opened book on reading tea leaves sits behind a tray full of dirty empty tea cups. Two viewfinders, side by side, show a man and woman in a passionate embrace, the other shows a couple with signs of stagnant disdain. You see a collection of porcelain hands. A half-eaten biscuit on a plate. You hear the sound of Judy Garland launch from the radio singing her tragic anthem, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”. You notice a book that dictates the signs of mental instability.

Often times, as in the case of “Storm Room” (2009), the imagined world is created so thoroughly, you really do question whether the artists have perhaps maneuvered a time slip or some sort of trans-continental teleportation device to get you to the empty Dentist’s office near Tokamachi, Japan, that was recreated for the piece.

Storm Room 1

[Photo: N.M. Hutcgubson]

An elaborate system of pipes, lighting, and speakers provide an uber realistic rendition of finding yourself unsure, even whilst in the comfort of “safety”. You can hear the coughing of a neighbour in the next “room”, and while you wait for the storm to “end”, you find yourself wondering where exactly you might have landed.

Storm Room 2

[Photo: N.M. Hutcgubson]

As water streams down the windows, and the rolling sound of thunder rattles the floor, you notice a roll of Japanese dental floss, buckets filling with water, a telephone, some old Japanese calendars, and a floor fan that only helps instil the uncomfortable quality of a 1960s Hiroshi Teshigahara film.

The Killing Machine- Cardiff Miller

[Photo: Seber Ugarte & Lorena Lopez]

Another unsettling piece, 2007’s  “The Killing Machine”, transports to a world unexpected and unknown. Forcing the viewer to imagine the violence and pain of being held on its soft pink fur chair at the will of two  elegantly choreographed, rotating stabbing wands, the piece is equally unsettling as it is beautiful.

Cardiff Miller- the killing machine - 2007

[Photo: Seber Ugarte & Lorena Lopez]

A statement on the nature of capital punishment, as well as a riff off Franz Kafka’s “In the Penal Colony”, the piece works on the level that it blends these horrors with a beautiful array of coloured lights, a disco ball (who doesn’t love a disco ball?), and almost triumphant orchestration for a bizarrely amusing and eerie imagining of our society’s indifference to killing.

The most impacting piece, had to be the first piece ventured to in the gallery – “Opera for a Small Room” which the couple created in 2005. The piece is a 20 minute long immersion into the tale of a sad and mysterious man (“R DENNEHY”) who speaks throughout the piece about his sad tale of lost love, and a seemingly lost sense of self.

Cardiff Miller - Opera for a Small Room

[Photo: Cardiff/Miller]

Contained in a small shed-like space filled to the brim with nearly 2,000 individual records, eight record players, and twenty-four antique loudspeakers; the piece encapsulate a mysterious, melancholy, and mildly sinister mood, all while telling the story of the strange man who embodies the space between the sounds of various arias, sounds, songs, and pop music. The entire story is aligned with the change of synchronized light and colour.

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[Photo: Cardiff/Miller]

As the piece progresses you are enticed to circle the “room” to peer through the wall’s various cut-outs and doorways in hopes of gaining new perspectives on the world inside. As your eyes begin to wander you notice bowling trophies, suitcases, and other objects that add to this strange simulated reality. Its an opus of emotion, and another testament to the artists’ unique craft.

opera for a small room- cardiff miller- room

[Photo: Kunsthaus Bregenz]

   Writing is like a 3-Dimensional process for me. The words and sentences have to work with a physical space, resonate with that space. One thing works on the page but it’s a different thing when they are juxtaposed with a physical environment.

Janet Cardiff

Like a movie in real time playing before your eyes, the works of Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller are remarkable and exciting works of contemporary Canadian art that we are lucky enough to have gotten the chance to enjoy so closely and thoroughly.

The artists’ cinematic tendencies and unusual combination of various sound and media point to a world where the disparate worlds of various arts and industry can coincide and exist together, for engaging and elevating works of art that not only provide an aesthetic experience, but delve deep into the psyche to penetrate the world of dream, nightmare, and emotion.

To put it plainly, “Lost in the Memory Palace” is as close to Utopia as we’ve seen in this world yet. There are plenty of other pieces by the couple to enjoy at the exhibit, so be sure not to miss out on this incredibly poignant and realized showing on now at the AGO.

“Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller” at the Art Gallery of Ontario {April 6, 2013 – August 18, 2013}, for more info click here.

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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1940s Rebel Teen Skater Boy {Vintage Street Style Inspiration}

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Some things are simply forever. Diamonds, of course, being one of them, but beyond that we must conclude on Style – an eternal force that can elevate you beyond the realm of time and place, and if you play your cards right, you might just live forever.

Case in point this lovely handsome bad-ass 1940s rebel teen skater boy, we have here….

This photograph is a perfect example of how Style can truly live forever. If I didn’t tell you that the photograph was taken in the 1940s (the snapshot is stamped June 3, 1940 to be exact), you could probably trick someone into believing it was taken maybe yesterday in black and white with a few vintage props. What is it exactly that tricks us into this magic? Well, no trick at all. It’s simply the lasting power of a classic look.

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Even while surfing the sidewalks, a pair of pressed khaki trousers seems to do this bad boy fine; and paired with a well fitted black graphic sweater – this look couldn’t be more on point. Round it out with that sickening hair style (a casual part, ruffled by the wind)  and I’d say he looks 2013 bound for me.

So while we’re used to the baggy shorts and zippered hoodies of skater kids of late; we hope all you fine rebels out there can take a note from our wicked skater boy and his style savvy ways, to promote a handsomer approach to being free. Doesn’t mean you have to lose yourself, just check yourself before you wreck yourself.

It’s time to join the pack, and carry on in the lineage of classic style, and keeping cool under pressure. Don’t you agree?

Must have been a real heart breaker, that one . . .

Until next time my vintage friends and fiends!

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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