Tag Archives: Cannes

Cannes 2012 Lineup Announced!

Each year a certain brand of artistic achievement is showcased and honored in Cannes. It’s a mysterious quality, always. Perhaps it’s the inevitable “European”-ness of it all; you picture the cameras, the stars, the glamour, all done French Riviera style (very easy to romance). But for most people there, it’s really about the true art of the screen, and that for one is a true pleasure.

Browsing through our press kit for this year’s Cannes Film Festival we can’t help but notice   President Gilles Jacobs’ sentiment

 “What has changed in cinema? Everything. Gone, the pioneers and the innocence, the way of filming, cameras, understanding audiences, duration, rhythm, acting…In a world that sacrifices everything to what’s superficial, to the new-best-thing, to the lowest common denominator, to the non-debate of ideas through apathy, what counts, what makes us strong, is our passion for cinema and for those who make it”

This year, the lineup at Cannes is highly impressive, and boasts a handsome list of  international talent. Some of the directors competing this year include David Cronenberg, Michael Haneke, and 88-year old French Auteur, Alain Resnais.

As for the stars, there should be no shortage. Some names to expect to see: Tilda Swinton (Moonrise Kingdom), Brad Pitt (Killing Me Softly), Isabelle Hupert (L’Amour), Jessica Chastain (Lawless), Mia Wasikowska (Lawless), and of Twilight lore – Kristen Stewart (On the Road) and Robert Pattinson (Cosmopolis).

Some of the past winners of the Palme D’Or,  include: Apocalypse Now (1979)The Tree of Life (2011)La Dolce Vita (1960)Jigoku [“Gate of Hell”] (1954) Taxi Driver (1976)Pulp Fiction (1994)Paris, Texas (1984)Wild at Heart (1990)The Piano (1993),  The Pianist (2002)and Elephant (2003)All have undoubtedly further the art of the cinema, as well as the art of style itself.

So, here’s the list:

OPENING NIGHT FILM:

Moonrise Kingdom – Dir: Wes Anderson

COMPETITION (20 FILMS):

Rust and Bone – Dir. Jacques Audiard
Holy Motors – Dir. Leos Carax
Cosmopolis – Dir. David Cronenberg
The Paperboy – Dir. Lee Daniels
Killing Them Softly – Dir. Andrew Dominik
Reality – Dir. Matteo Garrone
Love (Amour) – Dir. Michael Haneke
Lawless – Dir. John Hillcoat
In Another Country – Dir. Hong Sang-soo
Taste of Money – Dir. Im Sang-soo
Like Someone In Love – Dir. Abbas Kiarostami
The Angels’ Share – Dir. Ken Loach
Beyond the Hills – Dir. Cristian Mungiu
After the Battle (Baad el Mawkeaa) – Dir. Yousry Nasrallah
Mud – Dir. Jeff Nichols
You Haven’t Seen Anything Yet – Dir. Alain Resnais
Post Tenebras Lux – Dir. Carlos Reygadas
On the Road – Dir. Walter Salles
Paradise: Love – Dir. Ulrich Seidl
The Hunt (Jagten) – Dir. Thomas Vinterberg

CLOSING NIGHT FILM:

Therese Desqueyroux – Dir. Claude Miller

UN CERTAIN REGARD (17 FILMS):

Miss Lovely – Dir. Ashim Ahluwalia
La Playa – Dir. Juan Andres Arango
God’s Horses (Les Chevaus de Dieu) – Dir. Nabil Ayouch
Trois Mondes – Dir. Catherine Corsini
Antiviral – Dir. Brandon Cronenberg
7 Days in Havana – Dirs. Laurent Cantet, Benicio Del Toro, Julio Medem, Gaspar Noé, Elia Suleiman, Juan Carlos Tabío, Pablo Trapero
Le Grand Soir – Dirs. Benoît Delépine & Gustave de Kervern
Laurence Anyways – Dir. Xavier Dolan
Despues de Lucia – Dir. Michel Franco
Aimer a Perdre la Raison – Dir. Joachim Lafosse
Mystery – Dir. Lou Ye
Student – Dir. Darezhan Omirbayev
The Pirogue (La Pirogue) – Dir. Moussa Touré
White Elephant (Elefante Blanco) – Dir. Pablo Trapero
Confession of a Child of the Century – Dir. Sylvie Verheyde
11.25 The Day He Chose His Own Fate – Dir. Koji Wakamatsu
Beasts of the Southern Wild – Dir. Benh Zeitlin

OUT OF COMPETITION (3 FILMS):

Hemingway & Gellhorn – Dir. Philip Kaufman
Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted – Dirs. Eric Darnell, Tom McGrath, Conrad Vernon
Me and You – Dir. Bernardo Bertolucci

SPECIAL SCREENINGS (5 FILMS):

Polluting Paradise – Dir. Fatih Akin
Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir – Dir. Laurent Bouzereau
The Central Park Five – Dirs. Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, David McMahon
Les Invisibles – Dir. Sebastien Lifshitz
Journal de France – Dirs. Claudine Nougaret & Raymond Depardon
A Musica Segundo Tom Jobim – Dir. Nelson Pereira dos Santos
Villegas – Dir. Gonzalo Tobal
Mekong Hotel – Dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul

MIDNIGHT SCREENINGS (2 FILMS):

Dario Argento’s Dracula 3D – Dir. Dario Argento
The Legend of Love & Sincerity (Ai To Makoto) – Dir. Takashi Miike

 

 Who do you think’s going to carry it all the way this year? Let us know! Leave a comment below!

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Fancy and Folly: Giving Me The Silent Treatment

When I first saw the trailers for “The Artist“, shortly after it’s premier at the Cannes Film Festival that would lead to Jean Dujardin’s Best Actor win at the prestigious art festival, I was not impressed. Silly folly, I thought. Reductive (Thanks, Madonna). Wasted Inspiration. How could this “NEW” silent film set in th 20s really make a splash? There was no way, in my mind, that the audiences of 2011 would really appreciate the novelty…but surprisingly, they did!

Don’t know what it is about this one (as I’m still stubbornly NOT seeing it) that really taps a chord with everyone these days, but one thing is certain we have a hit on our hands! Picking up seven wins at the British Academy Awards last night, the film is continuing it’s unbeatable winning streak all the way to the Oscars.

Granted, the recreation of the 1920s looks great (especially costumes by first-time Academy Award nominee Mark Bridges, who painstakingly recreated designs from the 20s), not to mention Du Jardin’s charisma and winning smile, but there seems to be something so defeatist about watching a silent film made in 2012.

Why do I need to see this? I have seen many silent films, some of which are the most impressive pieces of film making, or dare I say ART, I’ve ever seen: “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” (1920), “Birth of a Nation”(1915) , “Intolerance”(1916), “The Gold Rush”(1925), “Metropolis”(1927), “Voyage to the Moon” (1902), and “Pandora’s Box” (1929) are all some of the most important films ever made, as well as full of some of the most visually arresting images of all time.

 

All these films were made before sound became an unstoppable force in making movies. Before this time, the power of image and word, and the novelty of the moving image was enough to begin a revolution that would become Hollywood. And don’t think that because these films were made without sound that they are PG fair, because most silent classics are full of adultery, scandal, ghosts, vampires, drugs, sex, violence, and witches- all the things we love at The Eye of Faith, minus the rock n’ roll!

Watching the films of that time are magical in itself, as it’s probablly the closest any of us could ever get to time travel in our lifetime. It’s fascinating getting lost in Louise Miller’s beautiful bow lips, or catching Valentino’s devilish gaze- these celluloid dreams are the closest thing we have to these faded idols of yesteryear and their long lonst lost time. Having been made on film, we are getting a literal imprint of a moment in time playing out before our eyes. Absolute magic!

Back in those days, they didn’t have any of the technology we have today to make movies- all you had was a team full of people and a whole lot of passion to try to tell your story. Even “The Artist” couldn’t escape from having the shoot the film first in Colour, to then digitally manipulate the film to the lauded black and white photogrpahy being praised today.

Back in the 1920s, there is no way they would have shot a film only to have to redo it completely somewhere else; if time meant money now, time really meant money in those days- but today in 2012, I’m afraid that time for these jewels only means edging closer and closer to obscurity.

Ultimately, it’s about love for movies in general. I cannot fault director Michel Hazanavicius’ vision, bringing his ode to Silent Era to the masses, and hopefully with it’s growing popularity the film can also bring some love to the real classics of the 1910s and 1920s. However, I can’t help but think “The Artist” may even further dampened our view of the true days of Hollywood Babylon. Reductive.

Many people, like myself, see all the promos for “The Artist” and can’t see past the gimmick of it all. (I mean, REALLY?!!) Hopefully this doesn’t taint the idea of watching a real classic- seeing as you can watch a “NEW” one. Or maybe I’m being much too cynical and everything is jolly! It’s great to see so much love for the past, in general though. Perhaps simply, the time of nostalgia has really struck.

Throughout the years, silent films have provided an endless source of inspiration. Luckily, many silent films are being restored and archived so future generations can enjoy the magic of the past. Watching a silent film, you can almost feel lucky, as if somehow you have found a hidden doorway to the past, and luckily you can stay there (at least for an hour or two).

Lest we forget from whence we came, and enjoy a piece of the puzzle today!

We’ve included a scene from 1928’s “The Laughing Man” (a precursor to Batman’s iconic villain The Joker) for your viewing pleasure.

[And if you have a lot of time on your hand OpenFlix on Youtube has a ton of Full Length classic films for Free including the 1922 Swedish Documentary HAXAN on the History of Witchcraft!!! Silent and Spooky. Click Here.]

Now you have a good trajectory. So, have fun!!!

[PORTLANDIA:SEASON 2]

 

Sincerely,
{theEye}

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Almodovar’s “The Skin I Live In”

Almodovar’s newest film, The Skin I Live In looks intense. to say the least. Couldn’t shy from posting the beautiful poster by Paul Gatti, Almodovar’s long-time collaborator. Naturally, we love he reference to 18th and 19th Century naturalism, and the beautiful illustrations that captured the imagination of the public at the time.

The Guardian has a great article about the life and work of this great contributor. Thanks to Burken Bag for posting the mysterious trailer.


Can’t wait to see it! How about you? Leave a comment!


The Eye.

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Be. Wear. Scorpio!

Happy Birthday Scorpio! From Johnny Carson to Marie Antoinette, Scorpio’s can be dynamic individuals.  But avoid being on the receiving end of that sting! Ever hear about the turtle who gave the scorpion a lift across the river?
Not only are Scorpio’s passionate, perceptive, and resourceful, they can be Psychological, prowling, probing, and focused.   They can be the best of friends, or your worst enemy.
talk about Bling!
Opal Cufflinks (Edwardian 1910-1914)
The Driver (Real life Scorpio Ryan Gosling in Drive, maybe he had a hand in the design of his coat??)