Tag Archives: buster keaton

Shopping for Vintage Clothes : 4 TIPS FOR BEGINNERS

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If individuality is your thing and you can’t take any more of dressing like many others, vintage is the way to go! While you do need the confidence to match vintage outfits, if you pick the right clothes, you won’t have much to worry about.

Here are 4 tips to make your first vintage shopping spree a success.

Locate the Best Spots

If you know someone who dresses flawlessly in cool vintage pieces, consider yourself lucky and ask them right away where they buy their stuff from. If they frequent vintage garment dealers in your locality, you know where to head! In case they purchase items from abroad, ask them if they know any local dealers.


If you don’t know anyone you can turn to for help, try looking for local vintage dealers online. Additionally, do make it a point to visit estate sales, auctions, and flea markets.

Do ask your family members if they have any clothing items from the bygone years stashed away in their closets. Who knows, you may end up with some really amazing stuff!
School Daze AND Cigarettes

Research Well

When you see something that interests you, take a look at labels and see what era it belongs to. If you want something from the 1920s, you don’t want to come back home with something from the 1960s.

If there aren’t any labels, ask the dealers for more information on the item you wish to purchase. Spending some time online to learn about different dressing styles before you go shopping will be a great help.

When shopping online, make sure you only browse and shop from reputed websites. Websites run by vintage experts can also be trusted. Check user ratings and feedback, and always read the terms and conditions before you splurge. A website with a secure payment system is an added bonus!

Don’t forget to check the measurements of items you wish to purchase. Further to this, don’t buy items with stock images; real images give you a clearer picture. If pictures aren’t clear but you’re keen on buying something, you may want to request the seller to upload better ones or e-mail them to you.

The Day of the Locust- Karen Black 70s Goes 20s Vintage Style Amazing- The Eye of Faith Vintage

Be Wise with Your Purchases

You’re sure to find some outrageous stuff when looking for vintage pieces and you might get carried away and buy things you will never wear. So be wise when making purchases; sticking to classic cuts is advisable.

Furthermore, buy items in the style that you regularly wear. If you intend to purchase something offbeat, consider how you’ll wear it or what you’ll pair it with so that it doesn’t rot away in your closet. For example, a brightly colored vintage tie will go well with tailored suits, and a vintage t-shirt will pair well with a pencil skirt and a pair of heels.

Most importantly, buy items that fit you well. Of course, you might not find a perfect fit, but you can always get your vintage finds altered by your tailor! Even if you’re buying oversized items, make sure that they’ll look good on you when worn.

Refrain from buying items that require a lot of restoration work. Check the fit, and also examine garments and accessories thoroughly for tears, smells, and stains. Keep in mind that getting a good fit around the shoulders is a tough job even for experienced tailors, and that the best drycleaners may not always be able to rid your vintage finds of stains!

Do remember to pay attention to the condition of your vintage finds- you don’t want to purchase something that is too fragile. In addition to this, never purchase materials that you’re not comfortable wearing. As mentioned, read labels or ask dealers to help you make the right choices.

eof-silent-treatment-buster-keaton-6

Don’t Get Duped

Not everything you see online or at auctions and flea markets will be authentic vintage. Don’t let this dishearten you though; just keep the following in mind.

    • Ask lots of questions! If the item is genuine, you’ll get satisfactory answers. When buying from a physical shop, you can also pay attention to the dealer’s expressions and tell if they’re bluffing.
    • Check care labels- these were introduced in 1971 so if the item you’re eyeing has one, it couldn’t be older than that. Knowing when other items like belt loops, zippers, and Velcro were invented can also help you narrow down the age of garments.
    • Crepe was a 40s’ classic, nylon wasn’t used for clothing until the 50s, and polyester was widely used in the 70s.

 

  • Measurements in the 40s and 50s used to be a lot smaller. Also, armholes used to be narrower and hemlines didn’t rise above the knee until the 60s.

 

Danielle Brandino - The Eye of Faith- Photo by Michael Dach

Conclusion

Vintage shopping may seem like hard work considering there’s a huge possibility of picking the wrong things or things that you’ll never use. But now that you’ve read these tips on going about your first vintage shopping spree, you’ve got nothing to worry about.

With help from here, you’re sure to enjoy shopping for vintage clothing. What’s more, you’ll definitely choose the right things!

Happy shopping!

 

 

About the Author

TspjsYj5

Nicola Reynor is a passionate blogger who loves to blog about fashion, beauty, travel, health, fitness, wedding and lifestyle trends. When in leisure time, she prefers to spend time in traveling with friends and family. You can find more about her at Nicola+

E.O.F. Snapshot of the Day {July 18, 2012}

{“Where did that little rascal get to?”}

Buster Keaton [circa. 1920s]

Similar Stories:

E.O.F. Style Icon: Buster Keaton

Known as the ‘Great Stone Face’, standing at an astounding 5’5″ we honour a style icon, Buster Keaton. Unconventional, timeless, and one of a kind comedic sensibility, this man’s legacy is more than just dissolving film and a steely gaze. From a time where men had to be men, Buster found a spot for himself amongst film royalty, with a unique perspective to comedy, and a whimsy to his overall performance nobody could replicate. Watching old reels of this pro, we know we’re witnessing true magic.

“Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot.”
Buster Keaton

“Silence is of the gods; only monkeys chatter.”
Buster Keaton

Born Joseph Frank Keaton VI, by Vaudville performer parents Joe Keaton and Myra Keaton in Piqua, Kansas on October 4, 1895. The family soon came to tour the Vaudeville scene touring with a medicine show with one of the most dangerous acts about how to discipline a prankster child. Joseph adopted the nickname ‘Buster’ given to him by up and coming Illusionist Harry Houdini himself. Keatons father threw his son down a flight of stairs, where the Illusionist would pick up and dust off the young unharmed boy, referring to the fall as a “buster”.

Business savvy Joe Keaton recognized the appeal of a great show name. Developing in showbiz would lead a young Keaton to search for work in New York where Buster met successful film star and director Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbunkle. This led to Buster being cast in a short The Butcher Boy in 1917, an appearance that would launch Buster Keaton’s film career.

A true individual, Buster would never hesitate if he saw potential for a laugh, whether through some kind of physical comedy stunt (often insisting to do his own stunts which wasn’t common at the time), or going as far as dressing in drag.  This showman brought a fresh spin to the fading Vaudville scene.

Always relevant with the keen sense to know times are a’ changin’, and with a clear baritone voice and stage past, he had nothing to fear over the inevitable transition  of silent movies to ‘talkies’ .   Buster  wanted to bring his signature style to a new generation.  He came to remake many of his past works from the directors chair with modern actors shot for shot.

Having an eclectic and interesting upbringing, style was never something to shy away from for Buster Keaton. Buster busted out of the box with his outlandish and fun fashion choices, be it a tailored tuxedo, or a disheveled clown get-up. His charm and wit always will resinate through his work.

“I gotta do some sad scenes. Why, I never tried to make anybody cry in my life! And I go ’round all the time dolled up in kippie clothes-wear everything but a corset . . . can’t stub my toe in this picture nor anything! Just imagine having to play-act all the time without ever getting hit with anything!”
Buster Keaton

Having battled his own demons being an alcoholic, as well as having some failed marriages under his belt. His personnel was riddled with up’s and down’s, as is the biz. He would come to have a few children from different wives, but it was in 1940, he met and married his third wife Eleanor Norris, who was deeply devoted to him, and remained his constant companion and partner until Keaton’s death.

He was deservedly honoured with an Honorary Academy Award in 1960 for his unique talents and contributions to the film industry. Buster really did have it all, and we think his star is still shining bright today. Special thanks to fuckyeahbusterkeaton who has a great tumblr full of great Buster content!

He passed away at his home, peacefully in his sleep, shortly after playing cards with his wife.

+

+R.I.P.+

Here’s some stuff from {THE EYE OF FAITH SHOP} to conjure up the look!

++USE CODE XIXIXI for 25% OFF++

Until next time,

{theEye}

+

Similar Stories

      

Fancy and Folly: Giving Me The Silent Treatment

When I first saw the trailers for “The Artist“, shortly after it’s premier at the Cannes Film Festival that would lead to Jean Dujardin’s Best Actor win at the prestigious art festival, I was not impressed. Silly folly, I thought. Reductive (Thanks, Madonna). Wasted Inspiration. How could this “NEW” silent film set in th 20s really make a splash? There was no way, in my mind, that the audiences of 2011 would really appreciate the novelty…but surprisingly, they did!

Don’t know what it is about this one (as I’m still stubbornly NOT seeing it) that really taps a chord with everyone these days, but one thing is certain we have a hit on our hands! Picking up seven wins at the British Academy Awards last night, the film is continuing it’s unbeatable winning streak all the way to the Oscars.

Granted, the recreation of the 1920s looks great (especially costumes by first-time Academy Award nominee Mark Bridges, who painstakingly recreated designs from the 20s), not to mention Du Jardin’s charisma and winning smile, but there seems to be something so defeatist about watching a silent film made in 2012.

Why do I need to see this? I have seen many silent films, some of which are the most impressive pieces of film making, or dare I say ART, I’ve ever seen: “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” (1920), “Birth of a Nation”(1915) , “Intolerance”(1916), “The Gold Rush”(1925), “Metropolis”(1927), “Voyage to the Moon” (1902), and “Pandora’s Box” (1929) are all some of the most important films ever made, as well as full of some of the most visually arresting images of all time.

 

All these films were made before sound became an unstoppable force in making movies. Before this time, the power of image and word, and the novelty of the moving image was enough to begin a revolution that would become Hollywood. And don’t think that because these films were made without sound that they are PG fair, because most silent classics are full of adultery, scandal, ghosts, vampires, drugs, sex, violence, and witches- all the things we love at The Eye of Faith, minus the rock n’ roll!

Watching the films of that time are magical in itself, as it’s probablly the closest any of us could ever get to time travel in our lifetime. It’s fascinating getting lost in Louise Miller’s beautiful bow lips, or catching Valentino’s devilish gaze- these celluloid dreams are the closest thing we have to these faded idols of yesteryear and their long lonst lost time. Having been made on film, we are getting a literal imprint of a moment in time playing out before our eyes. Absolute magic!

Back in those days, they didn’t have any of the technology we have today to make movies- all you had was a team full of people and a whole lot of passion to try to tell your story. Even “The Artist” couldn’t escape from having the shoot the film first in Colour, to then digitally manipulate the film to the lauded black and white photogrpahy being praised today.

Back in the 1920s, there is no way they would have shot a film only to have to redo it completely somewhere else; if time meant money now, time really meant money in those days- but today in 2012, I’m afraid that time for these jewels only means edging closer and closer to obscurity.

Ultimately, it’s about love for movies in general. I cannot fault director Michel Hazanavicius’ vision, bringing his ode to Silent Era to the masses, and hopefully with it’s growing popularity the film can also bring some love to the real classics of the 1910s and 1920s. However, I can’t help but think “The Artist” may even further dampened our view of the true days of Hollywood Babylon. Reductive.

Many people, like myself, see all the promos for “The Artist” and can’t see past the gimmick of it all. (I mean, REALLY?!!) Hopefully this doesn’t taint the idea of watching a real classic- seeing as you can watch a “NEW” one. Or maybe I’m being much too cynical and everything is jolly! It’s great to see so much love for the past, in general though. Perhaps simply, the time of nostalgia has really struck.

Throughout the years, silent films have provided an endless source of inspiration. Luckily, many silent films are being restored and archived so future generations can enjoy the magic of the past. Watching a silent film, you can almost feel lucky, as if somehow you have found a hidden doorway to the past, and luckily you can stay there (at least for an hour or two).

Lest we forget from whence we came, and enjoy a piece of the puzzle today!

We’ve included a scene from 1928’s “The Laughing Man” (a precursor to Batman’s iconic villain The Joker) for your viewing pleasure.

[And if you have a lot of time on your hand OpenFlix on Youtube has a ton of Full Length classic films for Free including the 1922 Swedish Documentary HAXAN on the History of Witchcraft!!! Silent and Spooky. Click Here.]

Now you have a good trajectory. So, have fun!!!

[PORTLANDIA:SEASON 2]

 

Sincerely,
{theEye}

Similar Stories