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Emanuelle Riva, Mon Amour . . .

Emanuelle Riva Goes Crazy in Amour Film 2012 Michael Haneke

85-year old French movie star Emanuelle Riva, star of this year’s unapologetic future classic “Amour“, is already making history as the oldest Actress to be nominated in her category at this year’s Academy Awards, and might just be going on to make history again if she wins- making her the oldest Actress to win the Best Actress trophy ever (beating Jessica Tandy’s record back in 1990 for the film “Driving Miss Daisy” at the age of 81).

And with a surprise win at this year’s BAFTA Award (just ask David O’Russell), Ms. Riva might just be on her way to that podium to accept for this year’s Academy Awards, set for February 24. In reaction to her nomination, Riva said:

Emanuelle Riva and Jean Louis Trintignant, 2012

“I am truly happy, touched, and honored to receive, today in New York, a nomination for the role of Anne in AMOUR by Michael Haneke. For me,  it is an immense gift, at this stage of my life, to be chosen by my sisters and brothers, for what I do as an actress. I never thought,  while working throughout the years in Europe and France, that one day, i would cross the Atlantic Ocean, come to the United States, and be nominated. It is quite surreal for me.  Shooting AMOUR with Michael Haneke was a complete joy for me, as I felt an absolute trust in him and we were in complete synch. Michael is the very music of his own film.”

[Awards Daily]

The film is nominated for 5 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Style enthusiasts will be excited to see what Ms. Riva busts onto the red carpet come the big night. But, just because of her age, don’t count her out on making an impression. She is French, after all.

But on top of that, she is a star that has been working in the industry overseas for decades upon decades.

Amour 2012 Stars Emanuelle Riva and Jean Louis Trintignant

Hiroshima mon amour

HiroshimaMonAmour

Leave it to the Academy to wait until one of the most talented actresses there has ever been is 85 years old to garner a nomination. One of the first films that ever made a real impact on my style, and on my creative outlook was the 1959 art-house film classic, “Hiroshima, Mon Amour“, which aptly starred the beautiful blonde French bombshell (indeed, she was!).

The film was directed my Alain Resnais (“The Last Year At Marienbad“), and written by the novelist Margeurite Duras, in one of the most incredibly poetic screenplays ever written.

Emanulle Riva Goes A Little Crazy

Emanuelle Riva and Eji okada in Hiroshima Mon Amour

Emanuelle Riva Sexy in Hiroshima Mon Amour 1959 film

The film is fascinating as it travels in and out of the streets of Hiroshima, shot after the tragedy of the Atom bomb.

The film explores an interracial romance between Emanuelle Riva, a French Actress filming a war picture and her romance with the brilliantly handsome Eji Okada, and the culture clash that surrounds them in the beautiful ruins of the sad Japanese landmark.

The film is groundbreaking for the two as Eji Okada is given an almost European sophistication, not to mention a major dose of sex-appeal (something Asian men were not given in films at this time), and Emanuelle Riva bravely explores a plethora of conditions and situations as her character explores her past.

Emanuelle Riva shows off some major chops in this film – showing a range that could only be described as Award-worthy.

Sadly, the Academy was not up to snuff with their foreign film actresses, so it’s great today to see that so many talents from around the world are accepted into the limelight of fame and stardom no matter their age or race – what matters most is talent. And by gosh, does Emanuelle Riva have that!

Emanuelle Riva - Hiroshima Mon Amour Still

She is an actress that deserves to be recognized, and whose beauty we are lucky to have been captured on film over sixty years ago . Granted, she is very beautiful still, even at 85 years of age, but it’s really great to glimpse the actress in her younger years, watching her take big risks and break huge grounds. If it weren’t for her risky performances in the past, there probably wouldn’t even be the possibility of the range we see now for female actors in the industry.

Amour 2012- screen shots - EMANUELLE RIVA and Jean Louis Trintignant

Beauty can be summed up in many ways, but most importantly, it is this attitude of unwillingness to coincide with the expectations of the norms that is the most beautiful aspect of any human being there can be.

Fingers crossed for Emanulle Riva come the big night (if not her, we’d love to see little Quevenzhane Wallis take the prize!).

Until next time!

Emanuelle Riva, Mon Amour . . . 

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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{Style Wise} – Feathered Frenzy: Where Were You “Last Year at Marienbad” ?

Fresh off our post featuring an interview with Colleen Atwood and her immaculate creations for the new film “Snow White and the Huntsman“, {the Eye} began thinking of Charlize Theron’s haunting black raven feather “Transforming Cape” and how much it reminded me of Delphine Seyrig’s amazing feathered dress from the ambiguous and elusive 1961 French art house classic, “Last Year At Marienbad“.

Print This Out and Frame It!

Since it’s release in 1961, the film has captivated it’s viewers with it’s sleek black and white photography, decadent Hotel backdrop (Marienbad), and it’s mysterious plot, which involves a Man named “X” and a woman named “A” who may or may not have met the last year a Marienbad. It’s a wild ride through flashbacks, memories, dreams, faded thoughts, and blurred desires that remains the pinnacle of the New Novel movement.

 X

Empty salons. Corridors. Salons. Doors. Doors. Salons. Empty chairs, deep armchairs, thick carpets. Heavy hangings. Stairs, steps. Steps, one after the other. Glass objects, objects still intact, empty glasses. A glass that falls, three, two, one, zero. Glass partition, letters.

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Written by the renowned French author Alain Robbe-Grillet, and directed by Alain Resnais, the film hoped to break the bounds of narrative and conventional film style all together, and in exchange offer us, the audience, the chance to shape our own perception of the story being unfolded before us.

We may never get an answer from Resnais or Robbe-Grillet on what the film truly is or isn’t about, but it truly is a remarkable and powerful thing to have complete control over our own perception – don’t you think?

From a style perspective, it only takes one look at Delphine Seyrig‘s iconic black feathered cape to understand its staying power in our style consciousness.  Chic and elegant, it would take some serious rock ‘n’ roll attitude to pull this kind of look off today. This didn’t stop Karl Lagerfeld from using the film as the jump point for his collection last Spring/Summer 2011 for Chanel.

While the collection captured some of the signatures of Bernard Evein‘s enigmatic costume designs – feathers, sequins, sheer, black – there’s something masterful in the simplicity and cleanliness of the film’s sumptuous designs.

Here at {the Eye}, we’re going to sit back and let this mystery of a film continue to confuse and delight, as the demons of fashion plant the seeds of inspiration from sea to sea. What Resnais and Robbe-Grillet attempted was to reject accepted notions of time in telling a story- they step forward, backward, under, and sideways creating a timeless lingering legacy.

Inspiration is a strange thing going on and on, snowballing on through time non-stop. Between Charlize, Delphine, and Chanel it might be safe to say, if you’re feeling a little frenzied by feathers – you may just be on the right track!

We love a good mystery, and know you do too, so check out “Last Year At Marienbad” at Criterion today!

++UPDATE++ “Last Year at Marienabd” is part of the TIFF Cinematheque Summer in France programme at the TIFF Lightbox. So if you are in Toronto, and want to enjoy this grand mystery on the big screen, get your ticket today. We will see you there.

Sincerely,

{the Eye}

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Cannes 2012 Lineup Announced!

Each year a certain brand of artistic achievement is showcased and honored in Cannes. It’s a mysterious quality, always. Perhaps it’s the inevitable “European”-ness of it all; you picture the cameras, the stars, the glamour, all done French Riviera style (very easy to romance). But for most people there, it’s really about the true art of the screen, and that for one is a true pleasure.

Browsing through our press kit for this year’s Cannes Film Festival we can’t help but notice   President Gilles Jacobs’ sentiment

 “What has changed in cinema? Everything. Gone, the pioneers and the innocence, the way of filming, cameras, understanding audiences, duration, rhythm, acting…In a world that sacrifices everything to what’s superficial, to the new-best-thing, to the lowest common denominator, to the non-debate of ideas through apathy, what counts, what makes us strong, is our passion for cinema and for those who make it”

This year, the lineup at Cannes is highly impressive, and boasts a handsome list of  international talent. Some of the directors competing this year include David Cronenberg, Michael Haneke, and 88-year old French Auteur, Alain Resnais.

As for the stars, there should be no shortage. Some names to expect to see: Tilda Swinton (Moonrise Kingdom), Brad Pitt (Killing Me Softly), Isabelle Hupert (L’Amour), Jessica Chastain (Lawless), Mia Wasikowska (Lawless), and of Twilight lore – Kristen Stewart (On the Road) and Robert Pattinson (Cosmopolis).

Some of the past winners of the Palme D’Or,  include: Apocalypse Now (1979)The Tree of Life (2011)La Dolce Vita (1960)Jigoku [“Gate of Hell”] (1954) Taxi Driver (1976)Pulp Fiction (1994)Paris, Texas (1984)Wild at Heart (1990)The Piano (1993),  The Pianist (2002)and Elephant (2003)All have undoubtedly further the art of the cinema, as well as the art of style itself.

So, here’s the list:

OPENING NIGHT FILM:

Moonrise Kingdom – Dir: Wes Anderson

COMPETITION (20 FILMS):

Rust and Bone – Dir. Jacques Audiard
Holy Motors – Dir. Leos Carax
Cosmopolis – Dir. David Cronenberg
The Paperboy – Dir. Lee Daniels
Killing Them Softly – Dir. Andrew Dominik
Reality – Dir. Matteo Garrone
Love (Amour) – Dir. Michael Haneke
Lawless – Dir. John Hillcoat
In Another Country – Dir. Hong Sang-soo
Taste of Money – Dir. Im Sang-soo
Like Someone In Love – Dir. Abbas Kiarostami
The Angels’ Share – Dir. Ken Loach
Beyond the Hills – Dir. Cristian Mungiu
After the Battle (Baad el Mawkeaa) – Dir. Yousry Nasrallah
Mud – Dir. Jeff Nichols
You Haven’t Seen Anything Yet – Dir. Alain Resnais
Post Tenebras Lux – Dir. Carlos Reygadas
On the Road – Dir. Walter Salles
Paradise: Love – Dir. Ulrich Seidl
The Hunt (Jagten) – Dir. Thomas Vinterberg

CLOSING NIGHT FILM:

Therese Desqueyroux – Dir. Claude Miller

UN CERTAIN REGARD (17 FILMS):

Miss Lovely – Dir. Ashim Ahluwalia
La Playa – Dir. Juan Andres Arango
God’s Horses (Les Chevaus de Dieu) – Dir. Nabil Ayouch
Trois Mondes – Dir. Catherine Corsini
Antiviral – Dir. Brandon Cronenberg
7 Days in Havana – Dirs. Laurent Cantet, Benicio Del Toro, Julio Medem, Gaspar Noé, Elia Suleiman, Juan Carlos Tabío, Pablo Trapero
Le Grand Soir – Dirs. Benoît Delépine & Gustave de Kervern
Laurence Anyways – Dir. Xavier Dolan
Despues de Lucia – Dir. Michel Franco
Aimer a Perdre la Raison – Dir. Joachim Lafosse
Mystery – Dir. Lou Ye
Student – Dir. Darezhan Omirbayev
The Pirogue (La Pirogue) – Dir. Moussa Touré
White Elephant (Elefante Blanco) – Dir. Pablo Trapero
Confession of a Child of the Century – Dir. Sylvie Verheyde
11.25 The Day He Chose His Own Fate – Dir. Koji Wakamatsu
Beasts of the Southern Wild – Dir. Benh Zeitlin

OUT OF COMPETITION (3 FILMS):

Hemingway & Gellhorn – Dir. Philip Kaufman
Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted – Dirs. Eric Darnell, Tom McGrath, Conrad Vernon
Me and You – Dir. Bernardo Bertolucci

SPECIAL SCREENINGS (5 FILMS):

Polluting Paradise – Dir. Fatih Akin
Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir – Dir. Laurent Bouzereau
The Central Park Five – Dirs. Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, David McMahon
Les Invisibles – Dir. Sebastien Lifshitz
Journal de France – Dirs. Claudine Nougaret & Raymond Depardon
A Musica Segundo Tom Jobim – Dir. Nelson Pereira dos Santos
Villegas – Dir. Gonzalo Tobal
Mekong Hotel – Dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul

MIDNIGHT SCREENINGS (2 FILMS):

Dario Argento’s Dracula 3D – Dir. Dario Argento
The Legend of Love & Sincerity (Ai To Makoto) – Dir. Takashi Miike

 

 Who do you think’s going to carry it all the way this year? Let us know! Leave a comment below!

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