Category Archives: INNOVATION

Lost in a Paradise: {WWII Memories} Vintage Vernacular from Another Earth


This is a short clip from Terrence Malick’s “The Thin Red Line” which never ceases to inspire and engage the mind and soul with its thoughtful narration and invigorating visuals that take the viewer through the complex voyage of a soldier to war hidden by the beauty of “paradise“. . .

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It really must have been something to find yourself in a strange new world, another Earth far away from the hometown you left months before. You might never want to leave. You might hope to be left on a deserted island for the rest of your days; left alone by the complications of society.

Malick does a great job at creating this world, and you can get an even cooler glimpse into this world by digging into the world of vintage vernacular.

The Eye of Faith Vintage Snapshot- Hanging Out- Vernacular Photography- WWII History

Ask your grandparents and they probably have vintage snapshots to share with you, or dig through the bins of them at your local Flea Market or antique store. There are treasures to find. These memories of some lost paradise always seem to be like faded remnants of some beautiful black and white dream. . .

Here’s a few to quench your thirst! Soak it up, and bring this lost paradise with you wherever you go.

God of War- Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration - the Eye of Faith

Naked Rations- Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration- The Eye of Faith

The Coconut Man- Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration

Vintage 1940s Common Towels Ads - Paradise Lost - Military Men

Nature Boy- Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration- The Eye of Faith

Vintage Military Men- WWII War Buddies - Snapshot Vernacular-Summer Pals

Why should I be afraid to die? I belong to you. If I go first, I’ll wait for you there. On the other side of the dark waters.
Be with me now.

-BELL, “The Thin Red Line” by Terrence Malick {based on the novel by James Jones}

Escape The Everyday - Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration

The War Machine- Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration

Vintage 1940s Common Towels Ads - Paradise Lost - Military Men in the Jungle

Silly Soldiers Draggin It Up- Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration

Lonely Beaches - Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration

WWII Buddies Pals Friends Fools - Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular - Style Inspiration

Man of War- Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration

Another Earth - Paradise Lost- Vintage Vernacular- Style Inspiration - The Eye of Faith

What’s this war in the heart of nature? Why does nature vie with itself? The land contend with the sea? Is there an avenging power in nature? Not one power but two?

-TRAIN, “The Thin Red Line” by Terrence Malick {based on the novel by James Jones}

Until next time,

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Baby, Let’s Cruise Away From Here. . . GUCCI Men’s Cruise 2017

Gucci Cruise 2017 at Westminster Abbey, London {May, 2016}

“I chose Westminster Abbey because everyone has this idea of London being cool, but for me the history is what’s really cool.” 

-Alessandro Michele {source}

Gucci-Cruise-Men-2017-1

Check out this righteous collection of photographs from Nick Waplington of the menswear in Alessandro Michele’s triumphant 2017 Cruise collection for GUCCI making another landmark in style for the classic Italian high fashion brand, and what is being known as another groundbreaker in the area of men’s fashion and style.

The inspirations are vast and varied ( spot turn of the century collegiate vibes, 80s punks, 90s street couture, 1920s leisurewear, 70s bohemian playboys, 50s varsity jocks,  19th century naturalists, Edo Japan, and more ), and its this exciting eclecticism that is putting Michele at the forefront of truly changing the way we look at specifically men’s fashion, which for the most part has become a sea of black, beige, and boring.

Our motto has always been ‘more is more’, and we’re happy to have such a prestigious like mind in our corner on the matter. If you are unfamiliar with the new GUCCI vibe, this collection of portraits will not only be getting you a taste, but you will truly understand what all the buzz is about. Taken almost portrait style, the loud and eccentric looks are jarringly juxtaposed against the backdrop of a stately English country home like a tribe of wanderlusting young men who had just conquered the Old World and are setting forth establishing the New.

Gucci-Cruise-Men-2017-73

This is a new voice, yes; and yet, much of what we see isn’t necessarily “new” in any way, in fact, as we pointed out with the mass of inspirations colliding in this collection, its a true example of taking from the {past} to invigorate the {present} and thus poising change for the {future} …

“The men’s wardrobe is like a ritual and I am fascinated by it and its codes. The codes are not to be cancelled, they have to be reinvented and repositioned in a different fresco. There is the part of formalwear which I consider like the father of all the different styles. There are some punk pieces which are the most romantic part of the collection. When you are punk you are romantic, because you want to break the rules. And then there is the preppy/street part which recalls college-wear and is thought for more relaxed moments. Each of these parts has its own codes and, as always, I enjoyed putting a sort of confusion among the different codes and languages.”

-Alessandro Michele {source}

We have always felt like fashion and style is like a secret society full of codes and rules and symbols that all add up to create greater meaning . . . like geomancy, the way you mix and match elements have different suggestions and powers. If you are wise, you can use these powers to your advantage in your day-to-day, and even make great strides in following your path to destiny.

Through Alessandro Michele’s meticulous orchestration, and continuing success in the fashion industry, be sure to check out the change that is ready to explode in our everyday! Just look around . . .

After looking through the photographs, I’m sure you will notice the sense of individualism achieved in this collection which is a funny thing to say, when a collection is usually thought of as a wholly distinct and cohesive mass, however, what Michele knows is that there will be dozens of different men who in their daily lives belong to whichever tribe  (suits, shorts, bohos, rock n rollers, geeks, streets, etc.) and having such an eclectic array provides the greatest cohesion amongst men.

Also, note the artisanal quality of each piece. This not the same GUCCI that you find horrible knock-offs of in Chinatown . . . these are truly thought out works of art. From the embroidery, to the hand painting, to the beading, bleaching, patchwork, knitwear; each piece has a true artist quality that renders the price tags not even as devastating when you think of the work involved, as well as the increasing value throughout time.

Even with all the embellishment, at the end of the day you are looking at classic and timeless pieces. If you check out our {SHOP} you can find a lot of style-wise pieces that can help you achieve the look!

 

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Keep it classic. Keep it timeless. Keep it unique.

Hopefully we provided some inspiration.

Carry forth, and be wise to your times.

Estis Virum Reddit

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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{MUSIC MINUTE} Galt MacDermot’s First Natural Hair Band ‘s “Walking in Space”

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+How dare they try to end this beauty+

In honour of our talented cast and crew of ‘HAIR’ and our three show weekend starting tonight, we are sending out this lovely {MUSIC MINUTE} to the universe featuring Galt MacDermot’s First Natural Hair Band, and one of our personal favourite songs of the show “Walking in Space”.

HAIR- Hamilton Theatre Inc- 2016 - Polaroid

It is alleged that Galt MacDermot wrote the entire score for ‘HAIR’ in only three weeks, and initially with at least 30 songs per act.

Galt Macdermot

+Bad Ass Galt MacDermot orchestrating the groovy revolution+

‘HAIR’ is labelled a rock musical, but according to MacDermot, he saw his music more alluding to the funk wave that was stirring through music at the time. And while we remember many of the show’s lustrous melodies, it is truly the powerful rhythms of the show that give the show its unique pulse.

If you ask us, it is the music in partnership with the timeless challenges of ‘HAIR’ that truly make it great.

All aboard the train to Mainline with stops in Pottsville and Moonville . . .

 Hope you enjoy!

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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{COMMERCIAL BREAK} West Coast Cast of ‘HAIR’ on “Smother Brothers”, 1968

 

Writers of 'HAIR' Gerome Ragni (L), Galt Macdermot (C), and James Rado (R)
Writers of ‘HAIR’ Gerome Ragni (L), Galt Macdermot (C), and James Rado (R)

If you know us, you know that our tagline in life and business both is “Escape the Everyday” . . . and as of late, we have been living out this philosophy not only in our day to day conjuring our many style spirits who help us guide our way through our destiny, but journeying into the past performing in Hamilton Theatre Inc.‘s production of “HAIR: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical”!

Aaron is “Woof” and Paul is an exciting, fun member of the Tribe, and having the chance to bring this iconic piece of art to life has been a rejuvenating, invigorating, and educating experience.

Before production began, we had been doing tons of research on the original show, its history, and the time period it portrays (a tribe of hippies in 1968 New York City) in preparation for designing costumes for the production, which then inspired the decision to be an even more involved cog in the wheel.

For three months our cast and crew have worked tirelessly to ignite the fire that initially made ‘HAIR’ such a phenomenon almost fifty years ago. Here’s some photos from TIME magazine before the original show hit the Broadway stage:

{Photo Source}

Ironically, the anti-establishment ‘HAIR’  became one of the biggest mainstream successes of Broadway history, and also brought this alternative culture to the masses in a huge way.

Before there was even a barometer of “hippie” style, ‘HAIR’ put its stamp on the vibe with designs by iconic costume designer Theoni V. Aldredge (best known for her Academy Award winning designs for 1974’s ‘The Great Gatsby’).

We use the word “timeless” a lot in this forum, but the word could not be more appropriately paired with this show.

Today, our world is as chaotic and confused as ever; and ‘HAIR’ fights against this conflict with love, happiness, and perhaps, utopian ideals that might never truly win the fight, but at least, keep the fight going.

Tickets are selling fast, so if you are local, do visit the website and order them ASAP. If you can’t see us in person, we encourage you to feel the vibe anyway, and enjoy this wicked quality video of the 1968 West Coast cast of ‘Hair’ performing some of the show’s iconic jams on the “Smother Brothers” show.

This is the Dawning of the Age of Aquarius!!!

Performances for ‘HAIR’ at 8pm: May 20, 21, 26, 27, 28 and 2pm on May 22

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW HERE

Let the Sunshine In!

Until we meet again,

{theEye}

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+ 90S THROWBACK to HEROINE CHIC +

 

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Photograph by Davide Sorrenti 

There probably isn’t an aesthetic that struck a chord so controversial in fashion as the notorious 90s inclination towards the new look: Heroine Chic. We are starting to see a bit of a return to this vibe in some of the world’s most prestigious runways, not surprising as the 90s is taking the 21st century by storm these days.

According to Wikipedia, heroine chic is defined as:

a look popularized in mid-1990s fashion and characterized by pale skindark circles underneath the eyes and angular bone structure. The look, characterised by emaciated features and androgyny, was a reaction against the “healthy” and vibrant look of models such as Cindy Crawford and Claudia Schiffer

We found this throwback video of a 1997 episode of Fashion Television (I miss you!) on the death of fashion wunderkind Davide Sorrenti who had been one of the industry’s top photographers for this new look.

Taking photos of his friends in New york City inspired by the images of Larry Clarke and Nan Goldin, and coming from a lineage of art/fashion, he quickly became the go-to for this latest look until his untimely death at only 20 years old from . . . you guessed it!

HEROINE! (Not doing very well for the cause . . . )

According to top 90s fashion photographer Corrine Day  (who is often attributed with the rise of Kate Moss to iconic model status and poster child of this new look) in a 1997 interview for Vogue:

“We were poking fun at fashion” – Corinne Day, 1997

Out of the 80s which was all about glam and excess, Corrine Day in particular, stripped down her editorials to the basics, and instead of big butts, red lips, exaggerated bosoms, and endless hair; she chose young nymph-like beauties with a more natural essence and a bit of grit for a more realistic aesthetic that was really a rejection of the then standard of beauty.

It’s hard to get the joke when you use the words ‘Heroine’ and  ‘Chic’ together, and then you think of the deaths of so many talented young people (first supermodel Gia Carangi, actor and E.O.F. Style Idol, River Phoenix, rock star Kurt Cobain, and of course, ‘heroine chic’ proprietor Davide Sorrenti) during this time, making it impossible to reject the realities that this truly was a problem in the industry. However, I think it is a shame to bash the entire industry and pigeon hole this aesthetic and its creators and muses as – EVIL.

After all, in the end – they are images. You take them as you do, and thats that.

“Is Heroine Chic even real?”

That’s a brilliant question Jeanne Beker asks in this clip, and its what I kept asking myself as I watched it. After all, even Bill Clinton had something to say about this trend and its abuse on younger generations who could be susceptible to the cool factor of the fashion industry essentially embracing drugs.

However, it wasn’t the photographers or models or industry people coining the phrase, it was simply a term coined by the media which quickly turned into a frenzy – on the verge of a witch hunt.

There will always be that push against changing times, and interestingly enough today we are seeing the shift realized towards more “full” sized women in the mainstream of the industry. But, in the end, what does that prove?

It is always important to push healthy body image, but honestly, some of these girls (and boys, too) cannot help being that thin, so I always find it unfair this constant scrutiny on body types. Perhaps, the less we made an issue of either end of the scale, there wouldn’t have to be a problem at all.

The truth is we don’t want to accept each other for what we are, which is absolute crime.

In the end, I guess this clip posted initially by Dazed & Confused Magazine really just got me thinking, and would definitely have me thinking for a while.  There’s no denying this controversial era absolutely broke down walls in the realm of fashion imagery, and brought a rebellion to the forefront that continues to this day.

Nobody is perfect, and that’s what I think this era really tried to capitalize on in the simplest way.

Milla Jovovich interviews at Fashion Out Loud circa. 1996 ft. Davide Sorrenti

The elusive world of fashion will probably always have some sort of bad rep, and that’s fine.

But don’t be silly enough to only look at the surface.

Try to dig deeper in all aspects of life.

Until next time,

{theEye}

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{Music Minute} Black Sabbath’s “Planet Caravan”


In the spirit of the dunes we thought this timeless classic could definitely coincide. . .

This is an ode to Black Sabbath, the mystical heavy blues rockers from Birmingham who knew just the way to make their music crawl.

With the use of the occult and horror-inspired lyrics, and one-of-a-kind 1970s rock ‘n’ roll bohemian swag, we are definitely feeling a brotherhood with this unique quartet!

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So let your spirit float to this one, kids. It is sure to take you somewhere…

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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Pictures loaded by Graham Young, Birmingham Mail. The first ever picture taken of Black Sabbath taken in 1968 of Tony Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne, Geezer Butler, Bill Ward, on a bank of grass close to Portland Road, Edgbaston. One hundred prints have been made at £495 each. Jim Simpson says: "If any one band can claim to be the originators of Heavy Metal, then that band is Black Sabbath. Strangely, Heavy Metal was not a term used in those days, though Sabbath certainly prided themselves on being heavier than any of their so-called rivals. In fact, their early publicity claimed, “Black Sabbath, the Heaviest Band Around. Makes Led Zeppelin sound like a kindergarten house band.” Quite how the Sabs changed from being a perfectly good blues band into the musical phenomenon that we all know and love is shrouded in mystery. It all started with Geezer Butler who contributed the band’s name as well as many of the songs. Their music developed naturally from then and it’s hard to indentify exactly what directly preceded it. Hendrix, yes, to a limited extent, but that only partly explains it. Whatever, Black Sabbath are THE Birmingham Rock Band. Ask yourself this. Who is the world’s most famous Brummie? Without doubt, it’s Ozzy. Also loaded: Jim Simpson at the private launch of Jim Simpson - A Photography Retrospective, an exhibition at Havill & Travis showcasing Jim's extraordinary collection of photographs from of pop, rock and blues stars from the 1960s. Jim was the first manager of Ozzy Osbourne and Black Sabbath. He has run Big Bear Records in Edgbaston for 46 years (to 2014) and founded the 30-year-old Birmingham International Jazz Festival in 1984. Havill & Travis at 14 Lonsdale Road, Harborne, Birmingham B17 9RA. Tel 0121 427 5763. www.havillandtravis.com The gallery is a partnership between fiends Dave Travis (left), ex rock photographer turned concert promoter and Mission Print founder Gerv Harvill. Pictures loaded by Graham Young, Birmingham Mail.
Pictures loaded by Graham Young, Birmingham Mail. The first ever picture taken of Black Sabbath taken in 1968 of Tony Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne, Geezer Butler, Bill Ward, on a bank of grass close to Portland Road, Edgbaston. One hundred prints have been made at £495 each. Jim Simpson says: “If any one band can claim to be the originators of Heavy Metal, then that band is Black Sabbath. Strangely, Heavy Metal was not a term used in those days, though Sabbath certainly prided themselves on being heavier than any of their so-called rivals. In fact, their early publicity claimed, “Black Sabbath, the Heaviest Band Around. Makes Led Zeppelin sound like a kindergarten house band.” Quite how the Sabs changed from being a perfectly good blues band into the musical phenomenon that we all know and love is shrouded in mystery. It all started with Geezer Butler who contributed the band’s name as well as many of the songs. Their music developed naturally from then and it’s hard to indentify exactly what directly preceded it. Hendrix, yes, to a limited extent, but that only partly explains it. Whatever, Black Sabbath are THE Birmingham Rock Band. Ask yourself this. Who is the world’s most famous Brummie? Without doubt, it’s Ozzy. Also loaded: Jim Simpson at the private launch of Jim Simpson – A Photography Retrospective, an exhibition at Havill & Travis showcasing Jim’s extraordinary collection of photographs from of pop, rock and blues stars from the 1960s. Jim was the first manager of Ozzy Osbourne and Black Sabbath. He has run Big Bear Records in Edgbaston for 46 years (to 2014) and founded the 30-year-old Birmingham International Jazz Festival in 1984. Havill & Travis at 14 Lonsdale Road, Harborne, Birmingham B17 9RA. Tel 0121 427 5763. http://www.havillandtravis.com The gallery is a partnership between fiends Dave Travis (left), ex rock photographer turned concert promoter and Mission Print founder Gerv Harvill. Pictures loaded by Graham Young, Birmingham Mail.

{MUSIC MINUTE} Orkestra Obselete’s “Blue Monday 1933”

Screen shot 2016-03-10 at 12.34.12 PM

Its official. It has been 33 years since the release of New Order’s iconic New Wave classic “Blue Monday”, and just the other day this incredible rendition by Orkestra Obselete brought the 80s jam to life using obsolete instruments from the 1930s!

On top of their wildly original version, we are obsessed with their dark and mysterious presentation which includes black masks, and dim lighting for the perfect secret society vibe!

You know that we are big believers in the {PAST} {PRESENT} and {FUTURE} colliding, and here we have the perfect example of how this magical mixture can really amp up our everyday, and make us see things a little differently!

You can mesh your life with the {PAST} and help shape the {FUTURE} by shopping the {SHOP}! Tons of ingredients to help conjure your unique style spirit, and don’t forget XIXIXI gets you 25% OFF.  Click here to shop now! 

For now enjoy these tunes!

Until next time,

{theEye}

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Commercial Break: Hiroshi Teshigahara’s “Woman in the Dunes” Trailer


If you’re looking for horror, sex, and a little intrigue look no further than this incredible cult classic from 1964: Hiroshi Teshigahara’s “Woman in the Dunes”. This art house film that could would garner Teshigahara an Academy Award nomination for Best Director in 1967 (he was beat by Robert Wise for “The Sound of Music”).

It’s a strange story, one first told by Japanese author Kôbô Abe (who also wrote the film’s screenplay) in the hugely successful novel by the same name. This is 1960s cinema at its finest and absolutely darkest. It’s also the kind of film that you wish was made now; a film that is provocative, lingering, sexy, intellectual, and above-all screams style!

So if you enjoy films with a core, and our thirst for the strange you’ll definitely appreciate this one.  There’s little blood, and definitely no ghosts, but there’s definitely something creepy that lurks with you long after the movie has ended. Trust us on this one and grab a copy from Amazon today!

 “The most frightening thing in the world is to discover the abnormal in that which is closest to us.”

– Kôbô Abe

Inspired? Are you fan? Let us know below!

Sincerely,

{theEye}

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E.O.F. TALKS TO: Johnny Terris, Bad Ass Underground Canadian Film Maker

E.O.F. TALKS TO Johnny Terris - Canadian Underground Film Maker- The Eye of Faith {Vintage}-3

I came from a very hardened punk background in the late 80’s and early 90’s and my early films really projected that. Of course there have been aspects of the more mainstream-type stuff I’m currently doing that, at first, have been difficult to navigate due to my past. But I’m learning. It’s a very rewarding process and I’m loving it.”

-Johnny Terris

Johnny Terris is one bad ass dude.

A true Renaissance man, Johnny has engaged in roles as actor, film maker, author, model, photographer and painter. Best known for his transgressive, violent punk-influenced films that were far from mainstream, even in the indie sense; Johnny would distribute his earliest on VHS in the streets of Halifax, Nova Scotia, to strangers. He even went as far to use his own blood in scenes!

Legendary for being asked to be Johnny Depp’s double in the early 90s – Johnny, in true rebel fashion, turned it down. Now he continues his work as an actor (AKA Edward Terris) in the TV miniseries “Sex & Violence”, which co-stars Academy Award winning actress, Olympia Dukakis.

The Eye of Faith is honoured to post this interview with a true pioneer of the subversively cool right here in the True North Strong and Free!

Special thanks to our correspondent John Wisniewski for the interview.

JW: When did you begin making films and and acting, Johnny?

JT:  I started doing movies around 1987 when I was 14 years old. Basically out of boredom living in a small town. My cousin, who was also my best friend, would film various things typical boys would do and then just decided to make a movie one day. We were heavily influenced by retro horror and grind house style film and my work of course reflected that. I never fit in with anyone in the small town where I lived and neither did he, so doing films were an outlet for us, an expression.  When I left home at 16, I became angrier and had an axe to grind with the world, so they eventually became more graphic and explicit and transgressive.

JW: Why did you decide to write an autobiographical novel?

JT: I started writing Sinister Splendor & Broken Glass back around 2002 but shelved it for many years. I originally started to write it for myself only, basically for therapeutic purposes because in 2001, the love of my life became a missing person and was never found so I thought writing about it would help with dealing with it. From there it just kind of spiraled into writing about my life from childhood, my early years on the street doing underground films and present stuff. The next thing I knew I pretty much had a book.

I compiled it together and released the first draft in 2011. It has since changed direction. Instead of an autobiography, it’s now more of a fictional character story that is set in the 1970’s and 1980’s, about a guy named Aaron, that is heavily based on my life instead of being about my life. That’s the third and final draft and the most recent one.

Nobody really knows who I am, and I’m sure most of the world wouldn’t care anyway so I decided to make it fiction that is based on me with characters based on my friends an family instead of the standard autobiography.  It made it more interesting to me that way. And I think to others reading it too. The book is still my life, but the characters are different.

E.O.F. TALKS TO Johnny Terris - Canadian Underground Film Maker- The Eye of Faith {Vintage}-1

JW: Any artists that have influenced your work?

JT: A few artists have influenced me in big way, Richard Kern and The Cinema Of Transgression were probably the biggest influence on me in terms of my own films. Retro 70’s and 80’s horror played a huge part as well. Early Dario Argento played a huge part. Grindhouse flicks, drive-in movies form that period.

From a very young age I was really influenced by a lot of vintage heterosexual porn too like Devil In Miss Jones, Devil Inside Her, Behind The Green Door etc. All the really strange and surreal X-rated films of that period. Early John Waters of course played an influence, especially in my early work.

Musically I was, and still am, obsessed with the NWOBHM/New Wave Of British Heavy Metal from the late 70’s and early 80’s. Bands like Girlschool, Motorhead, Plasmatics/Wendy O Williams, Saxon, Turbonegro, Judas Priest, bands like that. Tight jeans, white t-shirt, spiked wristband, leather jacket wearing, sneering bands. A lot of punk-tinged heavy metal from that period. Listening to that stuff gets me in writing mode immediately.

JW: Do you enjoy acting?

JT: Yeah of course, I wouldn’t do it if I didn’t enjoy it. I’m actually more comfortable in front of the camera being someone else than I am in my personal life. It’s always been that way. When I was a little kid I used to memorize scripts at the age of 9 or 10 years old and perform every character in my bedroom by myself for hours on end. Acting has always triggered something in me, as far back as I can remember.

E.O.F. TALKS TO Johnny Terris - Canadian Underground Film Maker- The Eye of Faith {Vintage}-2

JW:  You once doubled for Johnny Depp. What was that like?

JT: I never doubled for Johnny Depp. I was asked to when I was younger and living in Los Angeles but I was moving back to Canada at the time. I wouldn’t have done it anyway. I have no desire to be another actor, or anyone other than myself.  

JW:  What is your opinion of Hollywood and Hollywood movies?

JT: When I first went to Hollywood it was nothing like I expected it to be. It was actually pretty grimy and trashy. The Rainbow Bar & Grill was always fun. The Whiskey was fun. I don’t have a problem with mainstream cinema or the Hollywood stuff; it’s not exactly my thing, but being older now I’m not as ferocious against it like I used to be.

I used to revolt against it in a really hardcore way. But I’m currently one of the leads in a television series with Olympia Dukakis (who is an Oscar winner) so I’ve obviously tamed a bit in the old age and don’t care about that as much haha.

Most Hollywood films are formula and neatly packed for selling purposes and because of that it’s the same stuff just rehashed over and over again with a different title, and I personally find that very boring. Hollywood is very loud and explosive and action packed. They make and market their films that way. I prefer psychological films that are slower in tone and make you think.

JW:  Are you a horror film fan? Any favorite horror films, Johnny?

JT: Yeah I am a huge horror fan, I grew up on them and they are a huge influence. My mother was a huge lover of horror movies and nothing was really ever censored from me so I was watching stuff like ‘The Exorcist’ and ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre’ when I was just a little kid. I usually prefer the physiological ones over the gore. I have lots of favorite horror films, though my favorite one would have to be the original ‘Carrie’.

JW:  Are you working on any screenplays, Johnny?

JT: Nothing really big right now, no. I’m very slowly writing a screenplay/script which is a greaser-style drama film about two brothers and their alcoholic father. But that’s a work in progress and who knows how that will evolve; too early to tell right now. I am though, currently helping a friend of mine shoot his apocalyptic style film.

I’m more focused on acting and writing right now.


Be sure to check Johnny out in the latest season of “Sex & Violence” starring Olympia Dukakis on OUTTV.

Until next time,

{theEye}

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{MUSIC MINUTE} “ALL APOLOGIES” – NIRVANA

 

Kurt Cobain- King of Irreverence- The Eye of Faith Vintage- Mens Style Inspiration-1

As the title of this song says, “All Apologies”!!! Mostly for our truency. Have been having a very busy 2016 thus far, but can’t wait to be back. Got a few things planned up our sleeves, so please stay tuned. . .

In the meantime, enjoy this video, and this classic angsty tune by the King of Irreverence himself, Kurt Cobain. Filmed at Reading Music Festival in 1992, the video was posthumously released in 2009 by Geffen Records.

Kurt Cobain- King of Irreverence- The Eye of Faith Vintage- Mens Style Inspiration-2

Oh my god! Those rings though . . .

Check it, peeps. Don’t be afraid to wear what’s tattered and torn. Use it to your advantage and make a layered, irreverent nod to a classic look, but now you’re actually onto something… innovative, too!

And if you’re into this post, be sure to check out our interview with Chad Channing – Nirvana’s first and original drummer!

Also be sure to visit the {SHOP}. We’ve got some new updates brewing and stewing in style spirit, and are looking for suitably discerning homes these pieces.

Shop Now to Get The Look! 

Until next time,

{theEye}

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